9

I tried to implement strcmp:

int strCmp(char string1[], char string2[] )
{
    int i=0,flag=0;    
    while(flag==0)
    {
        if (string1[i]>string2[i])
        {
            flag=1;
        }
        else if (string1[i]<string2[i])
        {
            flag=-1;
        }
        else
        {
            i++;
        }
    }
    return flag;
}

but I'm stuck with the case that the user will input the same strings, because the function works with 1 and -1, but it's doesn't return 0. Can anyone help? And please without pointers!

3

You seem to want to avoid pointer arithmetics which is a pity since that makes the solution shorter, but your problem is just that you scan beyond the end of the strings. Adding an explicit break will work. Your program slightly modified:

int strCmp(char string1[], char string2[] )
{
    int i = 0;
    int flag = 0;    
    while (flag == 0)
    {
        if (string1[i] > string2[i])
        {
            flag = 1;
        }
        else if (string1[i] < string2[i])
        {
            flag = -1;
        }

        if (string1[i] == '\0')
        {
            break;
        }

        i++;
    }
    return flag;
}

A shorter version:

int strCmp(char string1[], char string2[] )
{
    for (int i = 0; ; i++)
    {
        if (string1[i] != string2[i])
        {
            return string1[i] < string2[i] ? -1 : 1;
        }

        if (string1[i] == '\0')
        {
            return 0;
        }
    }
}
26

Uhm.. way too complicate. Go for this one:

int strCmp(const char* s1, const char* s2)
{
    while(*s1 && (*s1 == *s2))
    {
        s1++;
        s2++;
    }
    return *(const unsigned char*)s1 - *(const unsigned char*)s2;
}

It returns <0, 0 or >0 as expected

You can't do it without pointers. In C, indexing an array is using pointers.

Maybe you want to avoid using the * operator? :-)

5

First of all standard C function strcmp compares elements of strings as having type unsigned char.

Secondly the parameters should be pointers to constant strings to provide the comparison also for constant strings.

The function can be written the following way

int strCmp( const char *s1, const char *s2 )
{
    const unsigned char *p1 = ( const unsigned char * )s1;
    const unsigned char *p2 = ( const unsigned char * )s2;

    while ( *p1 && *p1 == *p2 ) ++p1, ++p2;

    return ( *p1 > *p2 ) - ( *p2  > *p1 );
}
  • I would personally prefer while ( *p1 && *p1 == *p2 ) {++p1, ++p2}, but otherwise, nice answer. – Superlokkus Jan 20 '16 at 12:08
  • @Superlokkus The loop could be writtten like for ( const unsigned char *p1 = ( const unsigned char * )s1, *p2 = ( const unsigned char * )s2; *p1 && *p1 == *p2; ++p1, ++p2 ); As you see the loop has no body (statement). And it has another problem: pointers p1 and p2 are needed outside the loop.; – Vlad from Moscow Jan 20 '16 at 12:13
  • @Superlokkus So let's change it const unsigned char *p1 = ( const unsigned char * )s1, *p2 = ( const unsigned char * )s2; for (; *p1 && *p1 == *p2; ++p1, ++p2 ); But again this loop has no body. This is confusing. – Vlad from Moscow Jan 20 '16 at 12:15
  • @Superlokkus To make the body of the loop it is enough to place EXPESSSION as EXPRESSION STATEMENT outside the loop. In this case it will look like char *p1 = ( const unsigned char * )s1, *p2 = ( const unsigned char * )s2; while (; *p1 && *p1 == *p2 ) ++p1, ++p2 ;; So we have the same original loop but the init part of the loop and the expression part of the loop are placed outside the loop like one statement. – Vlad from Moscow Jan 20 '16 at 12:18
  • 1
    @Superlokkus I am sorry. I do not think we will be able to say something new each other.:) – Vlad from Moscow Jan 20 '16 at 17:18
2

This is a 10 opcodes implementation of strcmp (GCC assumed)

int strcmp_refactored(const char *s1, const char *s2)
{
    while (1)
    {
        int res = ((*s1 == 0) || (*s1 != *s2));
        if  (__builtin_expect((res),0))
        {
            break;
        }
        ++s1;
        ++s2;
    }
    return (*s1 - *s2);
}

You can try this implementation and compare to others https://godbolt.org/g/ZbMmYM

0

Taken from here.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

//using arrays , need to move the string using index
int strcmp_arry(char *src1, char *src2)
{
    int i=0;
    while((src1[i]!='\0') || (src2[i]!='\0'))
    {
        if(src1[i] > src2[i])
            return 1;
        if(src1[i] < src2[i])
            return 1;
        i++;
    }

    return 0;
}
//using pointers, need to move the position of the pointer
int strcmp_ptr(char *src1, char *src2)
{
    int i=0;
    while((*src1!='\0') || (*src2!='\0'))
    {
        if(*src1 > *src2)
            return 1;
        if(*src1 < *src2)
            return 1;
        src1++;
        src2++;
    }
    return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    char amessage[] = "string";
    char bmessage[] = "string1";
    printf(" value is %d\n",strcmp_arry(amessage,bmessage));
    printf(" value is %d\n",strcmp_ptr(amessage,bmessage));
}

I've made a few changes to make it work like strcmp.

  • 1
    You miss-copied, left out negative signs. – technosaurus Apr 25 '18 at 14:48
0

Your problem is that you don't detect the end of the string and therefore don't return zero if both strings ends before any difference is detected.

You can simply fix this by checking for this in the loop condition:

while( flag==0 && (string1[i] != 0 | string2[i] != 0 ) )

Note that both strings are checked because if only one is at the end the strings are not equal and the comparison inside the loop should detect that.

Please note that the character comparison might not yield the result that you might expect. For one it's not defined whether char is signed or unsigned so you should probably cast to unsigned char for comparison.

Perhaps a cleaner solution would be to return immediately when you detect the difference, that is instead of flag = -1 you return -1 directly. But that's more a matter of opinion.

  • 2
    The && is superfluous, you know string1[i] == string2[i] at this stage. – zakinster Jan 19 '16 at 9:57
  • if strin1 is zero and string 2 is not zero you continue to while into undefined behaviour – Peter Miehle Jan 19 '16 at 9:58
  • @PeterMiehle in that case string1[i]<string2[i] would be true and you'll stop returning -1. – zakinster Jan 19 '16 at 9:58
  • @zakinster Good points, I've decided to skip that solution and check in the loop condition instead. – skyking Jan 19 '16 at 10:00
  • @zakinster Not exactly, you know string1[i] was equal to string2[i] the last iteration if there were any. However the second test in the while statement checks if we reached the end of any of the strings and therefore it's needed anyway - the strings "a\0z" and "a\0y" should compare equal. – skyking Jul 28 '16 at 7:33
0

My Implementation

int strcmp(const char * s1, const char * s2)
{
    while (*s1 == *s2 && *s1++ | *s2++);
    int i = *s1 - *s2;
    return i < 0 ? -1 : i > 0 ? 1 : 0;
}

return values

-1 // <0
1  // >0
0  // ==0

The last ternary operation is optional

The function would still in the rules of strcmp when you just return *s1 - *s2.

  • You are comparing elements past the null. See: strcmp("foobar\0b", "foobar\0a") returns 1, should return 0 (as does strcmp from the standard library). Try this: while (*s1 && *s1 == *s2) {s1++; s2++;} – damisan May 6 at 15:02

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