2

This question already has an answer here:

I am busy making a function that gives the user a yes or no question. However I seem to be making a mistake with my script.

#!/bin/bash
read -p "Test, enter y or n: " choice
echo "$choice"
if [ "$choice"==y ]
then
  echo "you choose $choice"
else
  echo "you did not choose y"
fi

This always seems to return You choose y|n, despite the fact that I expect it to return you did not choose y.

I have been searching for a while now and tried to solve it using double brackets, no brackets, quotes, no quotes.

marked as duplicate by Charles Duffy bash Jan 19 '16 at 15:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • [[ "$choice" == "y" ]] – 123 Jan 19 '16 at 10:43
  • 1
    Please don't make scripts interactive without compelling reason; it is not the unix way to invoke programs. Far better is to have a command line option like my_program -y. – msw Jan 19 '16 at 11:01
  • @msw that is my intention but for the sake of this example i put it like this, as i discovered that my problem was specifically in this part of the code, no need to put extra 'useless' code here – Jelmergu Jan 19 '16 at 14:23
  • 1
    There are FAQs, and then there are things where literally exactly this bug is shown on the tag wiki page, in an example of how to take a bad question and improve it: stackoverflow.com/tags/bash/info – Charles Duffy Jan 19 '16 at 15:34
  • @CharlesDuffy Excuse me, I did not see that page, if I did I would not have asked the question – Jelmergu Jan 20 '16 at 8:57
3

It was a syntax error, you weren't correctly using the operator ==. You must put spaces around your operator. Good practice : put quotes around y so you know it's a literal value and use = rather than == for compatibility reason :

#!/bin/bash
read -p "Test, enter y or n: " choice
echo "$choice"
if [ "$choice" = "y" ]
then
  echo "you choose $choice"
else
  echo "you did not choose y"
fi

I didn't find any satisfying sources, here's is the best I could find :

  • 1
    must double the [] , is incorrect. missing the quotes around y also incorrect, your y is a name but you must use the litteral value "y", also incorrect. put spaces around your operator, is correct and the only problem with OP's code. – 123 Jan 19 '16 at 10:47
  • Well it did work for me. waiting to accept the answer. Would be nice if you could tell me why and/or point me to some reference – Jelmergu Jan 19 '16 at 10:48
  • 1
    If you don't put quotes around y, you're not doing a litteral match, yes you are, the quotes literally do nothing unless you are using special characters. – 123 Jan 19 '16 at 11:31
  • 3
    Not really any reason to use == instead of = as it only breaks compatibility with other POSIX shells. – Tom Fenech Jan 19 '16 at 11:38
  • 1
    Please consider using a better reference than the ABS -- it has a longstanding and unfortunate habit of showcasing bad practices in its examples. – Charles Duffy Jan 19 '16 at 15:35
0

Add spaces around == and it will work.

#!/bin/bash
read -p "Test, enter y or n: " choice
echo "$choice"
if [ "$choice" == y ]
then
  echo "you choose $choice"
else
  echo "you did not choose y"
fi
0

You just have to quote the second string "y" and put spaces between string1, the operator and string2.

[…]
if [ "$choice" == "y" ]
[…]

You don't have to double the square brackets.

  • Quoting y isn't necessary, and == should not be used with [ ... ]. – chepner Jan 19 '16 at 13:59
  • I know, that you don't have to quote. But in my opinion it is good practice to quote every string or character. – O.Meta Jan 20 '16 at 7:37
  • Then don't say "you just have to quote the second string". – chepner Jan 20 '16 at 13:58

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