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I had to solve a little problem today (trimming trailing whitespace in a MS Word document that the PDF converter had added to each and every cell), and I quickly found out that this isn't possible using the standard Word interface, so wrote a small VBA script:

Sub TrimCellSpaces()
    Dim itable As Table
    Dim C As Cell
    For Each itable In ThisDocument.Tables
        For Each C In itable.Range.Cells
            C.Range.Text = Trim(C.Range.Text)
        Next
    Next
End Sub

I was surprised that not only did this fail to remove the trailing spaces, it even added paragraph markers at the end of each cell. So I tried a regex approach:

Sub TrimCellSpaces()
    Dim myRE As New RegExp
    Dim itable As Table
    Dim C As Cell
    myRE.Pattern = "\s+$"
    For Each itable In ThisDocument.Tables
        For Each C In itable.Range.Cells
            With myRE
                C.Range.Text = .Replace(C.Range.Text, "")
            End With
        Next
    Next
End Sub

Same result. I added a breakpoint, copied the value of C.Range.Text (before replacement) into a hex editor and found that it ended in the hex sequence 0D 0D 07 (07 is the ASCII Bell character (!)).

I changed the regex to \s+(?!.*\w), and the script worked flawlessly. After the replace operation, the value of C.Range.Text ended only in 0D 07 (one 0D fewer).

I also tried this with a newly created table, not one generated by Word's PDF importer - same results.

What's going on here? Is Word using 0D 0D 07 as an "end of cell" marker? Or is it 0D 07? Why did \s+ remove only one 0D?

4
  • The trailing character isn't a whitespace character - it might just appear that way because your system can't display it properly. Trim$() will only remove whitespace characters at the start and end of a string - if the bell character appears at the end of the string then Trim$() won't work. Jan 19 '16 at 14:49
  • Yes, of course - my question is why there is a bell character in the first place. Create a new Word document, create a table, enter any value in that table and grab that cell's contents via VBA, and there's 0D0D07 at the end. Why? Jan 19 '16 at 15:18
  • aaah, I see - the way your question read I thought the PDF software was responsible for the bell character and you were wondering why the whitespace wasn't removed with it there. Apologies! Jan 19 '16 at 15:21
  • No worries, and I should have mentioned that this was independent of the table having been generated from a PDF file. Jan 19 '16 at 15:51
3

All cells in Word end in ANSI 13 + ANSI 07 - it's the "end of cell" marker (a little "sunshine" if you have the display of non-printing characters turned on in the UI). Word uses this for structuring the table and storing cell-related information.

It's not possible to remove this character combination from the table cells - Word requires it. If you could remove it, the table would break. So Word simply prevents you from deleting them.

If you need table cell content as a text string you basically need to check the character codes of the last two characters and remove them before you use the string. You need to check the two characters because Microsoft changed the way text is returned from a cell a few versions back. Sometimes it returns only one of the characters, sometimes both, depending on how you pick up the information and which version of Word is involved.

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  • That explains it - my regex probably removed both 0Ds, and Word replaced one to keep the cell "legal". Still weird that Trim() added a paragraph marker at the end of the cell, but OK. Is there any official documentation on this? Jan 19 '16 at 17:12
  • I'm sure there is, but a quick search doesn't turn up anything as clear-cut as my explanation. This has been the case for literally decades (more than 25 years) so I imagine the clear documentation is buried along with other WordBasic stuff. I can point you to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd909100(v=office.12).aspx (search the term: cell marker) And I imagine it might be mentioned in the ECMA documentation for the Open XML file format. Jan 19 '16 at 17:26

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