0

The code below does not compile, because both PreparedStatement.close() and ResultSet.close() throw a java.sql.SQLException. So do I add a try/catch block to the finally clause? Or move the close statements into the try clause? Or just not bother calling close?

PreparedStatement ps = null;
ResultSet rs = null;
try {
  ps = conn.createStatement(myQueryString);
  rs = ps.executeQuery();
  // process the results...
} catch (java.sql.SQLException e) {
  log.error("an error!", e);
  throw new MyAppException("I'm sorry. Your query did not work.");
} finally {
  ps.close();
  rs.close();
}
2

Make use of the new feature introduced in Java 7, try-with-resources Statement

For example...

try (PreparedStatement ps = conn.createStatement(myQueryString)) {
    // bind parameters
    try (ResultSet rs = rs = ps.executeQuery()) {}
        // process the results...
    }
} catch (java.sql.SQLException e) {
    log.error("an error!", e);
    throw new MyAppException("I'm sorry. Your query did not work.");
}
1

Use try-with-resources blocks (introduced in Java 7), which will automatically close resources for you.

Here is the equivalent code you posted, rewritten with a try-with-resource block:

try(PreparedStatement ps = conn.createStatement(myQueryString)) 
{
    ResultSet rs = ps.executeQuery();
    // process the results...
} catch(SQLException e) {
    log.error("an error!", e);
    throw new MyAppException("I'm sorry. Your query did not work.");
}

Note:
It is not necessary to call close() on the ResultSet here, because according to the Statement.close() doc:

When a Statement object is closed, its current ResultSet object, if one exists, is also closed.

1

A few ways to do this.

First and the simplest, if you are using Java 7 then implement try-with-resource as what mentioned in other answers.

Second way you can just add a try/catch to the finally block. Suggest to close ResultSet first, followed by Statement and finally Connection.

finally {
    if (rs != null) {
        rs.close();
    }
    if (ps != null) {
        ps.close();
    }
}   

Third way is to use external library eg Commons DbUtils which takes care of all the closing for you.

finally {
    org.apache.commons.dbutils.DbUtils.closeQuietly(rs);
    org.apache.commons.dbutils.DbUtils.closeQuietly(ps);
}

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