76

I’m working on a project where the JavaScript Date isn't big enough.

I want to place multiple events on the same time axis, some of them have month and day and some don't, so just using year is not an option. I want to be able to have the moon landing and big bang on the same axis.

It would help a lot if I could use the functionality that the existing Date object has. It only goes back 270,000 years and I need to go all the way back to big bang (13,800,000,000 years ago). I don’t need the dates to contain seconds or milliseconds.

How can I extend the Date object to include representation for such dates?

I have tried to find libraries or native functions for this but without luck. I also started looking for a JavaScript implementation of the Date object that I could modified, but I had no luck here either.

Update:

I started with remdevtec solution but ended up modifying it quite a lot. I wanted the dates to come in numeric order to make it easier sort and order the dates.

So what I did was that if the year is before -100,000 I treat the millisecond value as hours. This is what i got so far, and it works in our project, but if I get more time I will clean it up and put it on github.

JSFiddle

function BigDate(date){
    if(!date){
        this.original = new Date(); 
    }else if(date instanceof BigDate){
        this.original = date.original;
    }else{
        this.original = new Date(date);  
    }
    this.yearBreakpoint = -100000;
    this.breakPoint = Date.UTC(this.yearBreakpoint,0,0).valueOf();
    this.factor = 360000;//needed for our project to make extra space on our axis
}

BigDate.UTC = function (year, month, day, hour, minute, second, millisecond) {
    var temp = new BigDate();
    if(year < -temp.yearBreakpoint){
        temp.setUTCFullYear(year);
        return temp;
    }else{
        temp.original = Date.UTC(year,month,day,hour,minute,second,millisecond);
    }
    return temp.valueOf();
};

BigDate.now = function (){
    var temp = new BigDate();
    temp.original = Date.now();
    return temp.valueOf();
};

BigDate.parse = function (val){
    throw "not implemnted";
};

//custom functions

BigDate.prototype.getUTCDate = function () {
   if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
       return 0;
   }
   return this.original.getUTCDate();
};
BigDate.prototype.getUTCDay = function () {
   if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
        return 0;
    }
    return this.original.getUTCDay();
};
BigDate.prototype.getUTCFullYear = function () {
    if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
        return (this.valueOf() - this.breakPoint) / this.factor;
    }
    return this.original.getUTCFullYear();
};
BigDate.prototype.getUTCHours = function () {
    if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
        return 0;
    }
    return this.original.getUTCHours();
};
BigDate.prototype.getUTCMilliseconds = function () {
    if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
        return 0;
    }
    return this.original.getUTCMilliseconds();
};
BigDate.prototype.getUTCMinutes = function () {
    if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
        return 0;
    }
    return this.original.getUTCMinutes();
};
BigDate.prototype.getUTCMonth = function () {
    if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
        return 0;
    }
    return this.original.getUTCMonth();
};
BigDate.prototype.getUTCSeconds = function () {
    if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
        return 0;
    }
    return this.original.getUTCSeconds();
};

BigDate.prototype.setUTCDate = function (val) {
    if(val >= this.yearBreakpoint){
      return this.original.setUTCDate(val);
   }
};
BigDate.prototype.setUTCFullYear = function (val) {
    if(val < this.yearBreakpoint){
        this.original.setTime((parseInt(val) * this.factor) + this.breakPoint);
    }else{
        this.original.setUTCFullYear(val);
    }
    return this.valueOf();
};
BigDate.prototype.setUTCHours = function (val) {
    if(val >= this.yearBreakpoint){
      return this.original.setUTCHours(val);
    }
};
BigDate.prototype.setUTCMilliseconds = function (val) {
    if(val >= this.yearBreakpoint){
      return this.original.setUTCMilliseconds(val);
    }
};
BigDate.prototype.setUTCMinutes = function (val) {
    if(val >= this.yearBreakpoint){
        return this.original.setUTCMinutes(val);
    }
};
BigDate.prototype.setUTCMonth = function (val) {
    if(val >= this.yearBreakpoint){
      return   this.original.setUTCMonth(val);
    }
};
BigDate.prototype.setUTCSeconds = function (val) {
    if(val >= this.yearBreakpoint){
       return  this.original.setUTCSeconds(val);
    }
};

BigDate.prototype.setTime = function (val) {
    this.original.setTime(val);
    return this.valueOf();
};
BigDate.prototype.valueOf = function () {
    return this.original.valueOf();
};


BigDate.prototype.toDateString = function () {
    if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
        return "Jan 01 " + this.getUTCFullYear();
    }
    return this.original.toDateString();
};
BigDate.prototype.toISOString = function () {
    if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
        return this.getUTCFullYear() + "-01-01T00:00:00.000Z";
    }
    return this.original.toISOString();
};

BigDate.prototype.toJSON = function () {
    throw "not implemnted";
};
BigDate.prototype.toLocaleDateString = function () {
    throw "not implemnted";
};
BigDate.prototype.toLocaleTimeString = function () {
    throw "not implemnted";
};
BigDate.prototype.toLocaleString = function () {
    throw "not implemnted";
};
BigDate.prototype.toTimeString = function () {
    throw "not implemnted";
};
BigDate.prototype.toUTCString = function () {
    if(this.valueOf() < this.breakPoint){
        return "01 Jan "+ this.getFullYear() +" 00:00:00 GMT";
    }
    return this.original.toUTCString();
};




/**
 * Don't need no timezones
 */

BigDate.prototype.getDate = function () {
    return this.getUTCDate();
};
BigDate.prototype.getDay = function () {
    return this.getUTCDay();
};
BigDate.prototype.getFullYear = function () {
    return this.getUTCFullYear();
};
BigDate.prototype.getHours = function () {
    return this.getUTCHours();
};
BigDate.prototype.getMilliseconds = function() {
    return this.getUTCMilliseconds();
};
BigDate.prototype.getMinutes = function() { 
    return this.getUTCMinutes();
};
BigDate.prototype.getMonth = function () {
    return this.getUTCMonth();
};
BigDate.prototype.getSeconds = function () {
    return this.getUTCSeconds();
};
BigDate.prototype.getTimezoneOffset = function () {
    return 0;
};
BigDate.prototype.getTime = function () {
    return this.valueOf();
};

BigDate.prototype.setDate = function (val) {
    return this.setUTCDate(val);
};
BigDate.prototype.setFullYear = function (val) {
    return this.setUTCFullYear(val);
};
BigDate.prototype.setHours = function (val) {
    return this.setUTCHours(val);
};
BigDate.prototype.setMilliseconds = function (val) {
    return this.setUTCMilliseconds(val);
};
BigDate.prototype.setMinutes = function (val) {
    return this.setUTCMinutes(val);
};
BigDate.prototype.setMonth = function (val) {
    return this.setUTCMonth(val);
};
BigDate.prototype.setSeconds = function (val) {
    return this.setUTCSeconds(val);
};

BigDate.prototype.toString = function () {
    return this.toUTCString();
};

11
  • 14
    You should specify what your requirements are for those dates. Do you need to perform date arithmetic for example?
    – Aaron
    Jan 20, 2016 at 9:42
  • 23
    Do you really need to know days and months if the year is 45,000,000 BC? If so, which calendar do you want to use (especially since this date pre-dates calendars and humans)? I suppose it might be nice to record Dippy's birthday.
    – MT0
    Jan 20, 2016 at 9:53
  • 2
    Understand that it is highly unlikely that the calendar system will remain the same for another 270000 years. Heck, even 1000 years. Very long-range date calculations are probably futile. This also applies going back in time as well: the current Gregorian calendar system was only finally entrenched globally about a hundred years ago after WWI.
    – Simba
    Jan 20, 2016 at 15:34
  • 13
    Representing 270K years = First World Problem at its finest.
    – CodeAngry
    Jan 20, 2016 at 18:13
  • 1
    Have you considered using a logarithmic scale? Jan 21, 2016 at 9:07

4 Answers 4

81

I don’t need the dates to contain seconds or milliseconds.

Note that Gregorian calendar moves in cycles of 400 years, hence in cycles of 240,000 years. Therefore you can take the 60000 milliseconds representation of Date, that you don't want to use, to go back in 240000 years cycles (up to 60000 such cycles). This can take you to about year 14.4 billion BC (just before Big Bang :) ), with minute resolution.

The following example is not taking into consideration all the functionality of Date object. However with further implementation, I believe it is possible to have similar functionality. For instance, one BigDate, x, is bigger than another BigDate, y, if both dates are AC and x.original > y.original or if x.isAC() but !y.isAC(), or if both dates are BC such that either x.getFullYear() < y.getFullYear() or x.getFullYear() === y.getFullYear() && x.original > y.original.

BigDate usage:

var time = new Date (
  [year /*range: 0-239999*/], 
  [month /*range: 0-11*/], 
  [day of month /*range: 1-31*/], 
  [hours /*range: 0-23*/], 
  [minutes /*range: 0-59*/], 
  [a factor of 240,000,000 years to go back (from the first parameter year) /*range: 0-59*/],
  [a factor of 240,000 years to go back (from the first parameter year) /*range: 0-999*/]); 
var bigDate = new BigDate(time);

HTML

<span id="years"></span>
<span id="months"></span>
<span id="date"></span>
<span id="hours"></span>
<span id="minutes"></span>
<span id="acbc"></span>

JAVASCRIPT

function BigDate (date) { this.original = date; }    

// set unchanged methods,
BigDate.prototype.getMinutes = function () { return this.original.getMinutes(); }
BigDate.prototype.getHours = function () { return this.original.getHours(); }
BigDate.prototype.getDate = function () { return this.original.getDate(); }
BigDate.prototype.getMonth = function () { return this.original.getMonth(); }

// implement other BigDate methods..

And here comes the meat:

// now return non-negative year
BigDate.prototype.getFullYear = function () {  
  var ms = this.original.getSeconds() * 1000 + this.original.getMilliseconds();
  if (ms === 0) return this.original.getFullYear();
  else return (ms * 240000) - this.original.getFullYear();
}

// now add AC/BC method
BigDate.prototype.isAC = function () {
  var result = this.original.getSeconds() === 0 &&
    this.original.getMilliseconds() === 0;
  return result;
}

Some demo (can as well be used to produce BigDate.prototype.toString(), etc.) :

var years = document.getElementById("years");
var months = document.getElementById("months");
var date = document.getElementById("date");
var hours = document.getElementById("hours");
var minutes = document.getElementById("minutes");
var acbc = document.getElementById("acbc");

// SET A TIME AND PRESENT IT
var time = new Date (2016, 1, 28, 8, 21, 20, 200); 
var bigDate = new BigDate(time);
var monthsName = ["Jan", "Feb", "Mar", "Apr", "May", "Jun", "Jul", "Aug", "Sep", "Oct", "Nov", "Dec"];
years.innerHTML = bigDate.getFullYear();
months.innerHTML = monthsName[bigDate.getMonth()];    
date.innerHTML = bigDate.getDate();
hours.innerHTML = bigDate.getHours() + ":";
minutes.innerHTML = bigDate.getMinutes();
acbc.innerHTML = (bigDate.isAC()) ? "AC":"BC";

The resulted content would be: 4847996014 Jan 28 8: 21 BC

Here's a JSFiddle.

Clarification

Regarding (justified) design comments, I am aware that the BigDate object presented above manifests poor interface and design. The object is only presented as an example of consuming the unused information of seconds and milliseconds to satisfy the question. I hope this example helps to understand the technique.

5
  • @Zach Ross-Clyne Thank you for your edit proposal. I have edited some more, including your proposal for getSeconds() usage.
    – guysigner
    Jan 20, 2016 at 13:48
  • 12
    WTH not just store the offset/factor on the BigDate instance, instead of hiding it within the wrapped Date object? Also you should expose a useful constructor, instead of letting people mess around with "factors".
    – Bergi
    Jan 20, 2016 at 18:41
  • 2
    I'm with @Bergi. Hijacking the seconds and milliseconds is unnecessary and extremely confusing. It's remarkably poor design. -1.
    – jpmc26
    Jan 20, 2016 at 20:20
  • 2
    I didn't see the original before the edits but I don't think you really incorporated the given criticism into your revisions. I'm still seeing the offset being stuffed into the Date object's seconds and milliseconds fields for no reason in particular (no explained reason anyway). Why not put the offset into separate fields alongside this.original? Not to mention future large dates can't be represented without breaking isAC(). As has been stated by other commentators, this is poor design and IMO in its current state should not be the highest rated / accepted answer.
    – s-v
    Jan 21, 2016 at 3:39
  • @s-v The question did not care about representing future larger dates. Regarding your other comments, please see the appended clarification in the post.
    – guysigner
    Jan 21, 2016 at 6:46
31

If you only need to represent years, a simple Number might be enough : they can represent up to +/- 9007199254740991.

You could wrap it into a custom class to provide it with date functions.

0
18

Wrap the Date

Create a class of your own that extends the Date class by adding a long integer field "year offset".

Update all the methods that you want to use to apply this year offset - you can leave almost everything as-is, since you're not touching the complexities of handling time and days; maybe it will even be enough for you to change the constructors and string formatting routines to include "your" year in them.

11

The ECMAScript says:

A Date object contains a Number indicating a particular instant in time to within a millisecond. Such a Number is called a time value. A time value may also be NaN, indicating that the Date object does not represent a specific instant of time.

Time is measured in ECMAScript in milliseconds since 01 January, 1970 UTC. In time values leap seconds are ignored. It is assumed that there are exactly 86,400,000 milliseconds per day. ECMAScript Number values can represent all integers from –9,007,199,254,740,992 to 9,007,199,254,740,992; this range suffices to measure times to millisecond precision for any instant that is within approximately 285,616 years, either forward or backward, from 01 January, 1970 UTC.

The actual range of times supported by ECMAScript Date objects is slightly smaller: exactly –100,000,000 days to 100,000,000 days measured relative to midnight at the beginning of 01 January, 1970 UTC. This gives a range of 8,640,000,000,000,000 milliseconds to either side of 01 January, 1970 UTC.

The exact moment of midnight at the beginning of 01 January, 1970 UTC is represented by the value +0.

So you can create a custom method for Dates where you can use the integer value as the year. But on a practical note Ecmascript range for dates is good enough to hold all the practical dates. The one which you are trying to achieve does not make a real practical sense/meaning as even one is not sure if it follows the Babylonian astrology?

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