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I have an array:

["7", "8", "11", "13", "14"]

I want the closest inferior number to 11 if any (i.e. 8), or if such number does not exist, then the closest superior number to 11 (i.e. 13).

  • 1
    When implementing the method you described, what happened? Did you get any errors or wrong results? Please describe your approach and any errors you got. Please also see What topics can I ask about here? for details about how to ask questions on Stack Overflow. – Holger Just Jan 20 '16 at 9:53
  • I can't understand what you want. What is "closest number"? By index, by value? Be more specific and you always can use documentation – nobilik Jan 20 '16 at 10:02
  • A few more details would help. Is the array sorted? Are you permitted to have duplicates? Is your array of ints actually defined as an array of Strings? What if the array is empty? What are the constraints on the passed in integer? Examples with input and output covering these cases will help us help you. – miss.serena Jan 20 '16 at 10:07
  • @miss.serena None of your questions (except "What if the array is empty?") makes a point. If not sorted, then just sort it. I don't get why duplicates matter. As the OP gave, they are clearly strings. Why do you need a constraint on the integers? – sawa Jan 20 '16 at 10:10
12
h = ["7", "8", "11", "13", "14"].map(&:to_i).sort.group_by{|e| e <=> 11}
h[-1].last || h[1].first # => 8
  • 2
    Nice one, sawa! – Cary Swoveland Jan 20 '16 at 16:34
  • For people like me that were looking at "I want the closest lowest number to 3 in an array, with exact match if possible", here is your solution: tmp = [1, 2, 3, 5, 6].sort.group_by {|e| e <=> number_to_find}; closest_or_exact_number = tmp.try(:[], 0).first || tmp.try(:[], -1).last || tmp[1].first – Erowlin Nov 2 '17 at 15:09
8

Try Below shortest method for getting closest value

n = 40
a = [20, 30, 45, 50, 56, 60, 64, 80]
a.min_by{|x| (n-x).abs}
  • 1
    why we need sort here? without sort its working fine. – Ganesh Sagare Apr 6 '18 at 10:08
  • @GaneshSagare Yes updated my answer. thanks – Vishal Apr 6 '18 at 10:13
4

Yet another way to solve this:

a = arr.map(&:to_i).sort      #=> [7, 8, 11, 13, 14]
a.reverse.find { |e| e < 11 } #=> 8
a.find { |e| e > 11 }         #=> 13

Since find returns nil if no object matches, the last two lines can be combined via:

a.reverse.find { |e| e < 11 } || a.find { |e| e > 11 }
  • 1
    ...or a.reverse_each.find .. to avoid the creation of the temporary array a.reverse. – Cary Swoveland Jan 20 '16 at 22:40
4
def closest(arr, target)
  return nil if arr.empty?
  a = (arr + [target]).sort_by(&:to_i)
  idx = a.rindex(target)
  idx > 0 ? a[idx-1] : a[idx+1]
end

arr = ["11", "7", "13", "8", "11", "14"]

closest(arr, "12")   #=> 11
closest(arr, "12.5") #=> 11
closest(arr, "11")   #=> 11
closest(arr, "4")    #=>  7
closest(arr, "7")    #=>  7

Edit: Here's another way that uses the methods Object#to_enum, Enumerator#next and Enumerator#peek:

def closest(arr, target)
  return nil if arr.empty?
  e = arr.map(&:to_i).sort.to_enum
  x = nil # initialize to anything 
  loop do
    x = e.next
    break if x > target || e.peek > target
  end
  x.to_s
end

For arr above:

closest(arr, 12)   #=> 11
closest(arr, 12.5) #=> 11
closest(arr, 11)   #=> 11
closest(arr, 4)    #=>  7
closest(arr, 7)    #=>  7

When the enumerator is at its last value, peek will generate a StopIteration exception. Kernel#loop handles that exception by breaking out of the loop.

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