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I am trying to build a function that, given a CIDR, returns a regex that matches the IPs mapped to that CIDR.

For example:

def cidr_to_regex(cidr_input):
     return ip_matcher

The result of cidr_to_regex('192.168.100.14/24') should be a regex that matches the IP's associated with that CIDR address.

This is how I understand CIDR mapping, but I am not sure it is correct. Can you please help me figure it out?

Calling cidr_to_regex like in the example should return a regex that matches 192.168.100.x, where x is a number between 0 and 255.

This is because /24 means 24 bits of 1, that is the first 3 bytes of the address are 1, meaning that we only care about the remaining byte.

If I had cidr_to_regex('192.168.100.14/23') the first 23 bits would be 1, so I don't care about the first 2 bytes ( 16 bits ), and the last byte would be:

11111110 or 11111111, so 224 or 225.

This means I should match 192.168.y.x where y is 224 or 225 and x is between 0 and 225.

If I had cidr_to_regex('192.168.100.14/13') the first 13 bits of the IP are 1. This means I don't care about the first byte and the second byte has the first 5 bits equal to 1, so it's like this:

First bit: 11111111

Second bit: 11111xyz ( so it can be 11111000, 11111001, 11111010, etc )

My expression should match 192.z.y.x, where z is between 248 and 255 while x and y are between 0 and 255.

Am I not sure my understanding of CIDR is correct though. Can you help me understand how IPs map to CIDRs?

Thanks!

  • You appear to understand CIDR and VLSM correctly. Is there a specific problem or error you are getting with your program? – rtpddrummon Jan 20 '16 at 20:48
  • I am sure I don't understand it correctly. The rule I described here does not give the same result as a lot of online cidr calculators. Additionally, I am still struggling to build a regex that matches all the IPs of a given cidr. – RandomGuyqwert Jan 20 '16 at 20:59
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I went back over your example and I think you are slightly off in your calculations.

Let's break each example down.

Using 192.168.100.14/24, that gives you the following in binary.

11000000.10101000.01100100.00001110 - IP address      192.168.100.14
11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000 - Subnet mask     255.255.255.0 or /24
11000000.10101000.01100100.00000000 - Network address 192.168.100.0
                       ^ - last common bit

The addresses in this range would be 192.168.100.0 - 192.168.100.255

Using 192.168.100.14/23, that give you the following in binary.

11000000.10101000.01100100.00001110 - IP address      192.168.100.14
11111111.11111111.11111110.00000000 - Subnet mask     255.255.254.0 or /23
11000000.10101000.01100100.00000000 - Network address 192.168.100.0
                       ^ - last common bit

So the addresses in this range would be 192.168.100.0 - 192.168.101.255

Using 192.168.100.14/13, that gives you the following in binary.

11000000.10101000.01100100.00001110 - IP address      192.168.100.14
11111111.11111000.00000000.00000000 - Subnet mask     255.248.0.0 or /13
11000000.10101000.00000000.00000000 - Network address 192.168.0.0
             ^ - last common bit

So the addresses in this range would be 192.168.0.0 - 192.175.255.255

I hope that helps.

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