113

I want to display Date using European format dd/mm/yyyy but using DatePipe shortDate format it only display using US date style mm/dd/yyyy.
I'm assuming thats the default locale is en_US. Maybe I am missing in the docs but how can I change the default locale settings in an Angular2 app? Or maybe is there some way to pass a custom format to DatePipe ?

  • 1
    I'd like to know this too. I've found the date pipe docs which explains the order of the y's m' and d's in the format string are ignored as the order is set by the locale. But no indication of how to set (or even get) the locale. – Mark Farmiloe Jan 26 '16 at 16:01

12 Answers 12

231

As of Angular2 RC6, you can set default locale in your app module, by adding a provider:

@NgModule({
  providers: [
    { provide: LOCALE_ID, useValue: "en-US" }, //replace "en-US" with your locale
    //otherProviders...
  ]
})

The Currency/Date/Number pipes should pick up the locale. LOCALE_ID is an OpaqueToken, to be imported from angular/core.

import { LOCALE_ID } from '@angular/core';

For a more advanced use case, you may want to pick up locale from a service. Locale will be resolved (once) when component using date pipe is created:

{
  provide: LOCALE_ID,
  deps: [SettingsService],      //some service handling global settings
  useFactory: (settingsService) => settingsService.getLanguage()  //returns locale string
}

Hope it works for you.

46

Solution with LOCALE_ID is great if you want to set the language for your app once. But it doesn’t work, if you want to change the language during runtime. For this case you can implement custom date pipe.

import { DatePipe } from '@angular/common';
import { Pipe, PipeTransform } from '@angular/core';
import { TranslateService } from '@ngx-translate/core';

@Pipe({
  name: 'localizedDate',
  pure: false
})
export class LocalizedDatePipe implements PipeTransform {

  constructor(private translateService: TranslateService) {
  }

  transform(value: any, pattern: string = 'mediumDate'): any {
    const datePipe: DatePipe = new DatePipe(this.translateService.currentLang);
    return datePipe.transform(value, pattern);
  }

}

Now if you change the app display language using TranslateService (see ngx-translate)

this.translateService.use('en');

the formats within your app should automatically being updated.

Example of use:

<p>{{ 'note.created-at' | translate:{date: note.createdAt | localizedDate} }}</p>
<p>{{ 'note.updated-at' | translate:{date: note.updatedAt | localizedDate:'fullDate'} }}</p>

or check my simple "Notes" project here.

enter image description here

  • I am getting template parse error; can't compile filter 'localizedDate' I used with the same way as suggested. – Prasad Shinde Sep 26 '17 at 14:06
  • Have you declared LocalizedDatePipe correctly? See pipe.module.ts in my example project. – Milan Hlinák Sep 27 '17 at 11:34
  • Yes, I have solved it earlier, @Milan Hlinak I should have answered on my comment at that time only. But anyways thanks for your prompt response. You're doing great. – Prasad Shinde Sep 28 '17 at 8:45
  • This is apparently what i was looking for. Its a shame that a custom pipe is required to just change Locale at runtime though.. – dendimiiii Oct 23 '17 at 8:12
  • 2
    It works but pay attention that use an "impure" pipes is slower than the "pure". As Angular guide says: Angular executes an impure pipe during every component change detection cycle. An impure pipe is called often, as often as every keystroke or mouse-move. With that concern in mind, implement an impure pipe with great care. An expensive, long-running pipe could destroy the user experience. – Luca Ritossa Nov 28 '17 at 10:33
40

With angular5 the above answer no longer works!

The following code:

app.module.ts

@NgModule({
  providers: [
    { provide: LOCALE_ID, useValue: "de-at" }, //replace "de-at" with your locale
    //otherProviders...
  ]
})

Leads to following error:

Error: Missing locale data for the locale "de-at".

With angular5 you have to load and register the used locale file on your own.

app.module.ts

import { NgModule, LOCALE_ID } from '@angular/core';
import { registerLocaleData } from '@angular/common';
import localeDeAt from '@angular/common/locales/de-at';

registerLocaleData(localeDeAt);

@NgModule({
  providers: [
    { provide: LOCALE_ID, useValue: "de-at" }, //replace "de-at" with your locale
    //otherProviders...
  ]
})

Documentation

  • Indeed if you need to use some other locale except en-US, you should register it. Thanks for answer, @zgue – MikkaRin Jan 25 '18 at 13:30
12

I've had a look in date_pipe.ts and it has two bits of info which are of interest. near the top are the following two lines:

// TODO: move to a global configurable location along with other i18n components.
var defaultLocale: string = 'en-US';

Near the bottom is this line:

return DateFormatter.format(value, defaultLocale, pattern);

This suggests to me that the date pipe is currently hard-coded to be 'en-US'.

Please enlighten me if I am wrong.

4

You do something like this:

{{ dateObj | date:'shortDate' }}

or

{{ dateObj | date:'ddmmy' }}

See: https://angular.io/docs/ts/latest/api/common/index/DatePipe-pipe.html

  • sorry if it wasnt clear in my question but this is exactly what im doing but with pattern 'shortDate' and it shows only in US style. The time style is fine. – nsbm Jan 20 '16 at 16:01
  • The second example shows a format getting passed to the DatePipe, that's what you wanted no? – Langley Jan 20 '16 at 16:03
  • Tried but it doesnt work. Show just the number '5' independently of the date. – nsbm Jan 20 '16 at 16:06
4

On app.module.ts add the following imports. There is a list of LOCALE options here.

import es from '@angular/common/locales/es';
import { registerLocaleData } from '@angular/common';
registerLocaleData(es);

Then add the provider

@NgModule({
  providers: [
    { provide: LOCALE_ID, useValue: "es-ES" }, //your locale
  ]
})

Use pipes in html. Here is the angular documentation for this.

{{ dateObject | date: 'medium' }}
3

I was struggling with the same issue and didn't work for me using this

{{dateObj | date:'ydM'}}

So, I've tried a workaround, not the best solution but it worked:

{{dateObj | date:'d'}}/{{dateObj | date:'M'}}/{{dateObj | date:'y'}}

I can always create a custom pipe.

3

For those having problems with AOT, you need to do it a little differently with a useFactory:

export function getCulture() {
    return 'fr-CA';
}

@NgModule({
  providers: [
    { provide: LOCALE_ID, useFactory: getCulture },
    //otherProviders...
  ]
})
  • 4
    as of angular5, you can use a fat arrow expression in the providers array – iuliust Nov 12 '17 at 20:32
  • { provide: LOCALE_ID, useFactory: () => 'fr-CA'} did the trick for me ;) – JoxieMedina Dec 29 '17 at 5:43
1

If you use TranslateService from @ngx-translate/core, below is a version without creating a new pipe which works with switching dynamically on runtime (tested on Angular 7). Using DatePipe's locale parameter (docs):

First, declare the locales you use in your app, e.g. in app.component.ts:

import localeIt from '@angular/common/locales/it';
import localeEnGb from '@angular/common/locales/en-GB';
.
.
.
ngOnInit() {
    registerLocaleData(localeIt, 'it-IT');
    registerLocaleData(localeEnGb, 'en-GB');
}

Then, use your pipe dynamically:

myComponent.component.html

<span>{{ dueDate | date: 'shortDate' : '' : translateService.currentLang }}</span>

myComponent.component.ts

 constructor(public translateService: TranslateService) { ... }
0

Copied the google pipe changed the locale and it works for my country it is posible they didnt finish it for all locales. Below is the code.

import {
    isDate,
    isNumber,
    isPresent,
    Date,
    DateWrapper,
    CONST,
    isBlank,
    FunctionWrapper
} from 'angular2/src/facade/lang';
import {DateFormatter} from 'angular2/src/facade/intl';
import {PipeTransform, WrappedValue, Pipe, Injectable} from 'angular2/core';
import {StringMapWrapper, ListWrapper} from 'angular2/src/facade/collection';


var defaultLocale: string = 'hr';

@CONST()
@Pipe({ name: 'mydate', pure: true })
@Injectable()
export class DatetimeTempPipe implements PipeTransform {
    /** @internal */
    static _ALIASES: { [key: string]: String } = {
        'medium': 'yMMMdjms',
        'short': 'yMdjm',
        'fullDate': 'yMMMMEEEEd',
        'longDate': 'yMMMMd',
        'mediumDate': 'yMMMd',
        'shortDate': 'yMd',
        'mediumTime': 'jms',
        'shortTime': 'jm'
    };


    transform(value: any, args: any[]): string {
        if (isBlank(value)) return null;

        if (!this.supports(value)) {
            console.log("DOES NOT SUPPORT THIS DUEYE ERROR");
        }

        var pattern: string = isPresent(args) && args.length > 0 ? args[0] : 'mediumDate';
        if (isNumber(value)) {
            value = DateWrapper.fromMillis(value);
        }
        if (StringMapWrapper.contains(DatetimeTempPipe._ALIASES, pattern)) {
            pattern = <string>StringMapWrapper.get(DatetimeTempPipe._ALIASES, pattern);
        }
        return DateFormatter.format(value, defaultLocale, pattern);
    }

    supports(obj: any): boolean { return isDate(obj) || isNumber(obj); }
}
0

Ok, I propose this solution, very simple, using ngx-translate

import { DatePipe } from '@angular/common';
import { Pipe, PipeTransform } from '@angular/core';
import { TranslateService } from '@ngx-translate/core';

@Pipe({
  name: 'localizedDate',
  pure: false
})
export class LocalizedDatePipe implements PipeTransform {

  constructor(private translateService: TranslateService) {
}

  transform(value: any): any {
    const date = new Date(value);

    const options = { weekday: 'long',
                  year: 'numeric',
                  month: 'long',
                  day: 'numeric',
                  hour: '2-digit',
                  minute: '2-digit',
                  second: '2-digit'
                    };

    return date.toLocaleString(this.translateService.currentLang, options);
  }

}
-1

This might be a little bit late, but in my case (angular 6), I created a simple pipe on top of DatePipe, something like this:

private _regionSub: Subscription;
private _localeId: string;

constructor(private _datePipe: DatePipe, private _store: Store<any>) {
  this._localeId = 'en-AU';
  this._regionSub = this._store.pipe(select(selectLocaleId))
    .subscribe((localeId: string) => {
      this._localeId = localeId || 'en-AU';
    });
}

ngOnDestroy() { // Unsubscribe }

transform(value: string | number, format?: string): string {
  const dateFormat = format || getLocaleDateFormat(this._localeId, FormatWidth.Short);
  return this._datePipe.transform(value, dateFormat, undefined, this._localeId);
}

May not be the best solution, but simple and works.

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