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In our DB access layer, we are using the data type java.sql.Date for representing DATE columns, whereas in our beans, we are using java.util.Date (it's a legacy application).

Since java.sql.Date extends java.util.Date, is it safe to just set the java.sql.Date objects we obtain from the DB layer in our beans like this?

java.sql.Date sqlDate;
// bean.setValidFrom(java.util.Date validFrom)
bean.setValidFrom(sqlDate);

The code compiles just fine.

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No, it is not safe. Even though java.sql.Date extends java.util.Date, it is not a proper sub-type since it is not a behavioral subtype. Here's an example showing how the two types behave differently:

// not really a date, but a Date
Date date1 = new Date(0L);                                   
// really a date, but not a Date
java.sql.Date sqlDate = java.sql.Date.valueOf("1970-01-01"); 
// really a date, but a Date?
Date date2 = sqlDate;                                        
// a Date with time
date1.getHours();                                            
// a Date without time. <-- throws an IllegalArgumentException. 
// Wait, exactly *which* argument is illegal?
date2.getHours();                                            

You should create a new object of type java.util.Date, copying the value like this:

java.sql.Date dateFromDb;
bean.setValidFrom(new java.util.Date(dateFromDb.getTime()));

Fortunately, things got a lot better with Java 8.

| improve this answer | |
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    You shouldn't assume that there is any hour / minute / second information available on a java.sql.Date. That might be the case only because Date is really a java.time.LocalDate, i.e. a date with a timezone offset. If you're using Oracle, this java.sql.Date vs. java.sql.Timestamp mess will bite you in various ways. Using Timestamp will have negative effects on your execution plan, for instance. – Lukas Eder Jan 21 '16 at 13:18
  • (Just to be sure, the reason why I said this is because you shouldn't even rely on java.sql.Date.getTime(). The only reliable thing in that type is toString(), toLocalDate() and valueOf()) – Lukas Eder Jan 21 '16 at 14:07

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