0

I have one shapefile that covers an entire city, and a list of shapefiles which are buffers in different places in the city. I want to clip the city with each buffer. I tried using ArcPy in Python but the code is not working. What am I doing wrong?

import arcpy
from arcpy import env
from arcpy.sa import *
env.workspace = "U:\Park and Residential Area\Test\SBA park_res_buffer_5\SBA.gdb"
infeature= "U:\Park and Residential Area\Test\park_res_merge.shp"
clipfeatture = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses("*", "polygon")
for i in clipfeatture:
    outclipfeatture = arcpy.Clip_analysis(infeature,i)
    outclipfeatture.save("U:\Park and Residential Area\Test\SBA park_res_buffer_5/"*i)
  • Can you be more specific about how the code isn't working: is it outputting an error, or doing something other than what you expect? – Erica Jan 21 '16 at 3:06
  • Also be careful with the strings containing paths; the "\" is an escape character in Python. My preferred option is to make them raw strings like this: myString = r"path\to\data" – TomAdair Jan 28 '16 at 23:19
4

This is the appropriate syntax for using Clip in ArcPy:

arcpy.Clip_analysis(in_features, clip_features, out_feature_class)

so your for loop should instead be something like:

for i in clipfeatture:
    outfeature = "U:\Foo\Bar\" + i
    arcpy.Clip_analysis(infeature, i, outfeature)
1

I would also print() each file path string so you can check that its syntax is being used appropriately. Backslashes are escape characters in Python and can have special properties when followed by key letters.

I always put an r in front of any string that contains a file path, e.g. r"\\srvr\drv\proj\gdb.gdb\fc"; this tells Python it is a raw string and ignores the escape functions.

See link below for an entertaining analogy on handling backslashes in filenames.

https://pythonconquerstheuniverse.wordpress.com/2008/06/04/gotcha-%E2%80%94-backslashes-in-windows-filenames/

0

To do multiple clip with more than one clip features, you have to first create a list of all clip features and iterate them.

import arcpy
arcpy.env.workspace = file_path
fcList = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses()
for fc in fcList:
    arcpy.Clip_analysis(input_feature, fc, output_feature)

Be sure to have different names for your multiple outpus. You can use arcpy.CreateUniqueName() to create distinct names such as Buffer.shp, Buffer_1.shp, Buffer_2.shp ...

0
import arcpy
from arcpy import env
from arcpy.sa import *
env.workspace = "U:\Park and Residential Area\Test\SBA park_res_buffer_5\SBA.gdb"
infeature= "U:\Park and Residential Area\Test\park_res_merge.shp"
clipfeatture = arcpy.ListFeatureClasses("*", "polygon")
for i in clipfeatture:
    outfeature = "U:\Foo\Bar\" + i
    arcpy.Clip_analysis(infeature, i, outfeature)
-1

You can also export the iterate feature selection tool from Model Builder if each place is unique.

http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/tools/modelbuilder-toolbox/iterate-feature-selection.htm

# Import arcpy module
import arcpy

# Load required toolboxes
arcpy.ImportToolbox("Model Functions")


 # Local variables:
Selected_Features = ""
Value = "1"

# Process: Iterate Feature Selection
arcpy.IterateFeatureSelection_mb("inputfeature", "fields", "false")
  • Does that ModelBuilder tool work in a standalone Python script? (Many do not, but I don't have experience with IterateFeatureSelection.) – Erica Jan 4 '17 at 19:10
  • For a simple process like creating buffers for each individual buffer. You can save the model builder and go to file > export > export as python script and then bring it into the module you like to use. My example above is just the iterate feature selection tool - no additional data added. ArcGIS adds additional information (like the local variables) but if you build your data model and then export it and all the variables will be completed automatically based on what you did in model builder. – Smithw1 Jan 4 '17 at 19:47
  • To build your model you would just: Insert > Iterators > Feature selection for selected features it would be your buffers for values it would be your unique field (works as search cursor) Then attach your clip tool. use the selected feature (your current buffer) as the clip and your city as the input feature. make sure you make the output names unique. %Value%_Buffer will print the place name with _Buffer at the end to make it simple. – Smithw1 Jan 4 '17 at 19:48
  • I understand that; however, not all ModelBuilder commands work when run in Python, external to a Model within ArcMap. – Erica Jan 4 '17 at 19:48
  • Oh, I suggested the top one worked best not realizing you had posted it. I have used Iteratefeatureselection using arcpy and it has worked pretty well for me. I just didn't have the data to really post an example - just that the tool is an option. Sorry! – Smithw1 Jan 4 '17 at 21:02

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.