1

I have a job interface IJob like this:

public interface IJob {
    public void execute();
}

In my application I have multiple classes implementing this interface, like IJob1 and IJob2:

public class IJob1 implements IJob{
@Override
public void execute(){
    System.out.println("IJob1\n");
    }
}

public class IJob2 implements IJob{
@Override
public void execute(){
    System.out.println("IJob2\n");
    }
}

Because the amount of jobs to run increases steadily, I want to create a new job, which takes a list of IJob instances and runs them in parallel. The amount of threads that the new implementation is using to run the jobs in parallel should be configurable. If one of the jobs throws an exception, all other currently running jobs should be stopped as well and the execute() method should pass the exception to the caller.

I wrote this, but I can't be able to run jobs and to check if there is an error:

import java.util.LinkedList;

public class WorkQueue
{
    private final int nThreads;
    private final IJob[] threads;
    private final LinkedList queue;

    public WorkQueue(int nThreads)
    {
        this.nThreads = nThreads;
        queue = new LinkedList();
        threads = new IJob[nThreads];

        for (int i=0; i<nThreads; i++) {
            threads[i] = new IJob();
            threads[i].execute();
        }
    }

    public void execute(Runnable r) {
    synchronized(queue) {
        queue.addLast(r);
        queue.notify();
    }
}

private class PoolWorker extends Thread {
    public void run() {
        Runnable r;

        while (true) {
            synchronized(queue) {
                while (queue.isEmpty()) {
                    try
                    {
                        queue.wait();
                    }
                    catch (InterruptedException ignored)
                    {
                    }
                }

                r = (Runnable) queue.removeFirst();
            }

            // If we don't catch RuntimeException, 
            // the pool could leak threads
            try {
                r.run();
            }
            catch (RuntimeException e) {
                // You might want to log something here
            }
        }
    }
}
}

Could you please give me some few helps to go on? Thank you very much.

  • 2
    Have a look at ThreadPoolExecutor. Your jobs would be tasks in that context. – Thomas Jan 21 '16 at 9:51
  • They are not threads so they are executed sequentially... to create a thread you need to extends the Thread class – Marcx Jan 21 '16 at 9:52
  • Thank you for your help. I'll go to see this context – sharkbait Jan 21 '16 at 9:52
  • Btw, IJob[] threads seems misleading while new IJob(); wouldn't work anyways :) – Thomas Jan 21 '16 at 9:52
  • I updated the question with your indications. Could you please check if I'm on the right way? Sorry but I'm new on the multithreading development. – sharkbait Jan 21 '16 at 9:55
5

I would recommend a managed thread pool. A typical pattern is to use the Java Executors to obtain a ExecutorService. An ExecutorService is usually implemented with a pool of threads plus a job queue. On ExecutorService, there are methods like shutdownNow() which "Attempts to stop all actively executing tasks". That sounds like what you want to do.

Example,

List<Callable<Result>> tasks = new ArrayList<>();
for (final Object job: jobs) {
    final Callable<Result> task = new Callable<Result>() {
            @Override
            public Result call() throws Exception {
                // Do job here
                return result;
            }
        };
    tasks.add(task);
}
final numOfThreads = 20; 
final ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(numOfThreads);
try {
    executor.invokeAll(tasks);
} finally {
    executor.shutdownNow();
}
  • Great! Could you please give me an example for me in your answer? – sharkbait Jan 21 '16 at 9:57
  • @sharkbait I would use ExecutorService if you can't use Java 8. – Peter Lawrey Jan 21 '16 at 9:58
  • I use Java 7 so I can use this? – sharkbait Jan 21 '16 at 9:58
  • Could you please give me an example with my code? I don't know if I'm doing right. – sharkbait Jan 21 '16 at 10:03
  • Great example! I'll try your solution! :) – sharkbait Jan 21 '16 at 10:21
4

I want to create a new job, which takes a list of IJob instances and runs them in parallel. The amount of threads that the new implementation is using to run the jobs in parallel should be configurable. If one of the jobs throws an exception, all other currently running jobs should be stopped as well and the execute() method should pass the exception to the caller.

This is where using parallelStream() will make you life simpler. You can do

list.parallelStream().
    .forEach(IJob::execute);

You might find you don't need a framework at all and you can merge this code into the caller. e.g.

Map<String, T> map = dataSet.parallelStream()
                            .map(t -> t.transform1())
                            .filter(t -> t.isGood())
                            .collect(Collectors.groupingByConcurrent(t.getKey()));

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