5

I have a simple scenario using the Entity Framework in C#. I have an Entity Post:

public class Post
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
}

In my PostManager I have these methods:

public int AddPost(string name, string description)
    {
        var post = new Post() { Name = name, Description = description };

        using (var db = new DbContext())
        {
          var res = db.Posts.Add(post);
          res.Validate();
          db.SaveChanges();
          return res.Id;
        }
    }

    public void UpdatePost(int postId, string newName, string newDescription)
    {
        using (var db = new DbContext())
        {
            var data = (from post in db.Posts.AsEnumerable()
                where post.Id == postId
                select post).FirstOrDefault();

            data.Name = newName;
            data.Description = newDescription;
            data.Validate();
            db.SaveChanges();
        }
    }

The method validate() refers to class:

public static class Validator
{
    public static void Validate(this Post post)
    {
        if ( // some control)
            throw new someException();
    }

I call the validate method before the savechanges() but after adding the object to the context. What's the best practice to validate data in this simple scenario? It's better validate the arguments instead? What's happen to object post if the validate method throw exception after adding the object to the context?

UPDATE:

I have to throw a custom set of exception depending on data validation error.

3
  • 1
    I usually just use Data Annotations msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd901590(VS.95).aspx where EF will "look for it"; otherwise there are other means of invoking it at runtime from your own code – MickyD Jan 21 '16 at 13:07
  • @Micky Hi! In my project I have to throw customException when i validate the data. It's possible do it using Data Annotations? – Andrea Moraglia Jan 21 '16 at 13:18
  • Sure thing, check out my answer below – MickyD Jan 22 '16 at 4:48
4

I strongly recommend you to (if at all possible) to modify your entity so the setters are private (don't worry, EF can still set them on proxy creation), mark the default constructor as protected (EF can still do lazy loading/proxy creation), and make the only public constructors available check the arguments.

This has several benefits:

  • You limit the number of places where the state of an entity can be changed, leading to less duplication
  • You protect your class' invariants. By forcing creation of an entity to go via a constructor, you ensure that it is IMPOSSIBLE for an object of your entity to exist in an invalid or unknown state.
  • You get higher cohesion. By putting the constraints on data closer to the data itself, it becomes easier to understand and reason about your classes.
  • You code becomes self-documenting to a higher degree. One never has to wonder "is it OK if I set a negative value on this int property?" if it is impossible to even do it in the first place.
  • Separation of concerns. Your manager shouldn't know how to validate an entity, this just leads to high coupling. I've seen many managers grow into unmaintainable monsters because they simply do everything. Persisting, loading, validation, error handling, conversion, mapping etc. This is basically the polar opposite of SOLID OOP.

I know it is really popular nowadays to just make all "models" into stupid property bags with getters and setters and only a default constructor because (bad) ORMs have forced us to do this, but this is no longer the case, and there are so many issues with this imo.

Code example:

public class Post
{
    protected Post() // this constructor is only for EF proxy creation
    {
    }

    public Post(string name, string description)
    {
        if (/* validation check, inline or delegate */)
            throw new ArgumentException();

        Name = name;
        Description = description;
    }

    public int Id { get; private set; }
    public string Name { get; private set; }
    public string Description { get; private set; }
}

Then your PostManager code becomes trivial:

using (var db = new DbContext())
{
    var post = new Post(name, description); // possibly try-catch here
    db.Posts.Add(post);
    db.SaveChanges();
    return post.Id;
}

If the creation/validation logic is extremely intricate this pattern lends itself very well for refactoring to a factory taking care of the creation.

I would also note that encapsulating data in entities exposing a minimal state-changing API leads to classes that are several orders of magnitude easier to test in isolation, if you care at all about that sort of thing.

5
  • Thank you for the reply! I have to do the validation also in update operations. If I update a post entity I have to write all validation condition in "set" method too.. – Andrea Moraglia Jan 21 '16 at 14:09
  • If you have a known set of use-cases that require an entity to change state, you should create instance methods that encapsulate these operations. These will also be really easy to test, have high cohesion (keeping all validation in a giant validation static class is also maintenance nightmare fuel) and help protect your invariants. If the validation is trivial you can consider exposing the setter directly, but I find that in most cases, a method that accesses the private setter is cleaner and more maintainable. – sara Jan 21 '16 at 14:11
  • I do not see how "just enough for the object to be in a valid state" is contrary to what i wrote. Values that are needed should be injected, values that are not needed should be omitted of course. While I think it's generally wise to favor immutability where possible, I never made the case that all classes should be immutable without fail. A private setter does not an immutable class make. As I stated in an above comment, mutations of the class should be made possible in the appropriate cases, but it should be a small well-known set of operations, not a wide-open door to be misused however. – sara Jan 22 '16 at 9:06
  • It is also untrue that private setters prevents change tracking. I even explicitly addressed this in the answer, and I have my own production code and the EF documentation as living proof of it. – sara Jan 22 '16 at 9:07
  • What? Are you talking about mutability or change tracking? They are different things. You can expose a public setter or a method if you want to allow mutations of the object. The point is that you validate data when it is assigned, you prevent the object from ever being in an invalid state. Don't allow anyone to mutate the object however they want to. It's solid programming 101. Change tracking, on the other hand, is done by EF, and this doesn't care one bit about about the access modifiers of your set properties. If you don't believe me, read the docs. – sara Jan 22 '16 at 12:54
3

As I mentioned in the comments above, you might want to check out .NET System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations namespace.

Data Annotations (DA) allows you to specify attributes on properties to describe what values are acceptable. It's important to know that DA is completely independent of databases and ORM APIs such as Entity Framework so classes decorated with DA attributes can be used in any tier of your system whether it be the data tier; WCF; ASP.NET MVC or WPF.

In the example below, I define a Muppet class with a series of properties.

  • Name is required and has a max length of 50.

  • Scaryness takes an int but it must be in the range of {0...100}.

  • Email is decorated with an imaginary custom validator for validating strings that should contain an e-mail.

Example:

public class Muppet
{
    [Required]
    [StringLength(50)]
    public string Name {get; set;}  

    public Color Color {get; set; }

    [Range(0,100)]
    public int Scaryness {get; set; }

    [MyCustomEmailValidator]
    public string Email {get;set; }
}

In my project I have to throw customException when i validate the data. It's possible do it using Data Annotations?

Yes you can. To validate this object at any time of your application (regardless of whether it has reached EF or not) just perform this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
using System.Linq;

.
.
.
Post post = ... // fill it in
Validator.Validate(post);

public static class Validator
{
    public static void Validate(this Post post)
    {
        // uses the extension method GetValidationErrors defined below
        if (post.GetValidationErrors().Any())
        {
            throw new MyCustomException();
        }
     }
}


public static class ValidationHelpers
{

    public static IEnumerable<ValidationResult> GetValidationErrors(this object obj)
    {
        var validationResults = new List<ValidationResult>();
        var context = new ValidationContext(obj, null, null);
        Validator.TryValidateObject(obj, context, validationResults, true);
        return validationResults;
    }
.
.
.

If you want to get the validation error messages you could use this method:

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the validation error messages for column.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="obj">The object.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static string GetValidationErrorMessages(this object obj)
    {
        var error = "";

        var errors = obj.GetValidationErrors();
        var validationResults = errors as ValidationResult[] ?? errors.ToArray();
        if (!validationResults.Any())
        {
            return error;
        }

        foreach (var ee in validationResults)
        {
            foreach (var n in ee.MemberNames)
            {
                error += ee + "; ";
            }
        }

        return error;
    }

The free set of steak knives is that the validation attributes will be detected once the object reaches EF where it will be validated there as well in case you forget or the object is changed since.

2

I think you should be working with Data Annotation as @Micky says above. Your current approach is validating manually after it has been added.

using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;
// Your class
public class Post
{
    [Required]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    [Required,MaxLength(50)]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [Required,MinLength(15),MyCustomCheck] // << Here is your custom validator
    public string Description { get; set; }
}

// Your factory methods
public class MyFactory() {
     public bool AddPost() {
     var post = new Post() { Id = 1, Name = null, Description = "This is my test post"};
        try {
            using (var db = new DbContext()) {
                db.Posts.Add(post);
                db.SaveChanges();
                return true;
            }
        } catch(System.Data.Entity.Validation.DbEntityValidationException e) {
            Console.WriteLine("Something went wrong....");
        } catch(MyCustomException e) {
            Console.WriteLine(" a Custom Exception was triggered from a custom data annotation...");
        }
        return false;

     }
}

// The custom attribute
[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property | AttributeTargets.Field, AllowMultiple = false)]
sealed public class MyCustomCheckAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    public override bool IsValid(object value)
        {
          if (value instanceof string) {
                throw new MyCustomException("The custom exception was just triggered....")
          } else {
            return true;
          }
        }
}

// Your custom exception
public class MyCustomException : Exception() {}

See also: DbEntityValidationException class: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.data.entity.validation.dbentityvalidationexception(v=vs.113).aspx

Default data annotations http://www.entityframeworktutorial.net/code-first/dataannotation-in-code-first.aspx

Building your custom data annotations (validators): https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc668224.aspx

9
  • Thank for reply. I have to throw custom exceptions. It's possible to do it with data annotation? – Andrea Moraglia Jan 21 '16 at 13:28
  • I would advise to use the ValidationException class, as its use is built in to many other subsystems (ASP.NET has the ModelState: if(ModelState.IsValid) { // submit } else { // show error } Reasons you should use the validationexception class is that it already has the properties to (automatically) hold all validation issues. Why would you want to use a different exception? – Erik J. Jan 21 '16 at 13:29
  • I have to complete this assembly for an exam. The custom set of exception it's a project requirement in order to simplify the evaluation – Andrea Moraglia Jan 21 '16 at 13:33
  • You could try throwing a MyCustomBusinessLogicException() in your custom data annotation. Just add a catch(MyCustomBusinessLogicException e) {} to my code. - code was updated to reflect this last bit. All you hav to do is create a custom data annotation. – Erik J. Jan 21 '16 at 13:35
  • Thank you! I try to use custom data annotation – Andrea Moraglia Jan 21 '16 at 13:39
0

I always use two validations:

  • client side - using jQuery Unobtrusive Validation in combination with Data Annotations
  • server side validation - and here it depends on application - validation is performed in controller actions or deeper in business logic. Nice place to do it is to override OnSave method in your context and do it there

Remember that you can write custom Data Annotation attributes which can validate whatever you need.

0

You can modify the code in this way:

    public int AddPost(string name, string description)
    {
        var post = new Post() { Name = name, Description = description };
        if(res.Validate())
        {
            using (var db = new DbContext())
            {
              var res = db.Posts.Add(post);
              db.SaveChanges();
              return res.Id;
            }
        }
        else
            return -1; //if not success
   }


    public static bool Validate(this Post post)
    {
        bool isValid=false;
        //validate post and change isValid to true if success
        if(isvalid)
            return true;
        }
        else
            return false;
    }
1
  • Hi! Thanks for reply. I have to do it in UpdatePost too. When I get the object from DbContext I have to call the validation method on the object retrieved after updating data – Andrea Moraglia Jan 21 '16 at 13:29
0

After adding data to DbContext and before calling SaveChanges() you can call GetValidationErrors() method of DbContext and check its count to quiqckly check if there are any errors. You can further enumerate all of errors and get error details against each of them. I have bundled Error conversion from ICollection to string in GetValidationErrorsString() extension method.

 if (db.GetValidationErrors().Count() > 0)
 {
    var errorString = db.GetValidationErrorsString();
 }


 public static string GetValidationErrorsString(this DbContext dbContext)
{
    var validationErrors = dbContext.GetValidationErrors();
    string errorString = string.Empty;
    foreach (var error in validationErrors)
    {

        foreach (var innerError in error.ValidationErrors)
        {
            errorString += string.Format("Property: {0}, Error: {1}<br/>", innerError.PropertyName, innerError.ErrorMessage);
        }
    }
    return errorString;
}

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