100

I've got two branches (and master). Branch 2 is based on Branch 1 is based on master. I've submitted Branch 1 for review, it had some changes, I rebased some of those changes into history and merged the result into master.

Now I need to rebase Branch 2 on top of master to prepare it for review/merge.

The problem is that Branch 2 still contains the original commits of Branch 1, which don't exist anymore, so git gets confused. I tried rebase -i to drop the original commits of Branch 1, but the commits of Branch 2 don't base on top of master-before-branch-1.

What I need to do is take branch 2, drop some commits, and rebase just the remaining commits on top of master in a single operation. But I only know how to do these two operations in two distinct steps.

How can I rebase part of my branch onto another branch, dropping all commits that are not in common ancestry, except the ones I specify (e.g. from HEAD~2 up)?

Here's the current state:

master                     new branch 1
- - - - - - - - - - - | - - - - - - - - -
    \
     \   branch 1
      \ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
                     \
                      \     branch 2
                       \ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

What I want to end up with:

master            new branch 1    
- - - - - - - | - - - - - - - - - -
                                   \
                                    \
                                     \
                                      \    branch 2
                                       - - - - - - - - - 
3
  • 4
    An ASCII graph representing the state of your repo would help. At first glance, I'd say you're looking for git rebase --onto. See if this helps: stackoverflow.com/questions/28715619/…
    – jub0bs
    Commented Jan 21, 2016 at 14:23
  • 1
    Better! See also the top of stackoverflow.com/questions/25488138/…
    – jub0bs
    Commented Jan 21, 2016 at 14:31
  • git rebase --onto nearly worked for me. I did git rebase --onto master --root HEAD~1, but for some reason it picked three commits to bring with me instead of only HEAD~1 and upwards. Furthermore, instead of rebasing my branch, I'm now in detached HEAD state.
    – Puppy
    Commented Jan 21, 2016 at 14:34

5 Answers 5

128

The actual command would be:

git rebase --onto newbranch1 branch1 branch2

That will replay on top of new_branch1 all commits after branch1 up to branch2 HEAD.

As Joshua Goldberg puts it in the comments:

 git rebase --onto <place-to-put-it> <last-change-that-should-NOT-move> <change to move>

As Denis Sivtsov illustrates in the comments:

If you need only replay the last commit only from branch, in this case work:

git rebase --onto newbranch1 HEAD~1
6
  • 1
    It sure does (was about to post the same myself). Incidentally, git help rebase covers this case.
    – Tom Fenech
    Commented Jan 21, 2016 at 15:20
  • @TomFenech even better than git help rebase: stackoverflow.com/a/2369516/6309 (my old 2010 answer) ;)
    – VonC
    Commented Jan 21, 2016 at 15:24
  • 8
    The tricky thing for me was understanding that "upstream" in the help means the change to hold still. git rebase —onto <place-to-put-it> <last-change-that-should-NOT-move> <change to move> Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 22:41
  • @JoshuaGoldberg Yes: that is what I meant by "all commits after branch1". I have included your command in the answer for more visibility.
    – VonC
    Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 22:45
  • 1
    If you need only replay the last commit only from branch, in this case work git rebase --onto newbranch1 HEAD~1 Commented Nov 26, 2020 at 0:06
38

The solution is considerably simpler than I expected. It turns out that you can supply -i to a much larger variety of rebase commands (I thought it was only for rebasing a branch to itself for changing history). So I simply ran git rebase -i master and dropped those extra commits.

2
  • 5
    To clarify what @Puppy did was do an interactive rebase from branch 2 onto new branch 1 (git rebase -i new_branch_1 while on branch 2) and removed all the branch 1 commits using the interactive console so only branch 2's commits were played. Commented Jul 26, 2017 at 21:19
  • 1
    Yes, doing git checkout branch-to-move && git rebase -i new-parent-branch and keeping only lines that match the patches you want to keep works fine. Just be really careful not to drop any patch you don't want to lose. Commented Mar 18, 2020 at 11:19
19
git rebase --onto master HEAD~2
  • master - the branch you're rebasing onto
  • 2 - the last n commits from the current branch you need rebased

Source

1
  • 1
    Exactly what I needed, thank you!
    – Liran H
    Commented Oct 26, 2021 at 15:46
2

I find your ASCII graph a bit ambiguous, as branches don't really represent a range of commits - a branch points to a specific commit. I take it you mean something like

H (new-branch-1)
G
| F (HEAD -> branch-2)
| E
| D (branch-1)
| C
|/
B (master)
A

in which case the goal, and result of VonC's answer git rebase --onto new-branch-1 branch-1 branch-2, is

F' (HEAD -> branch-2)
E'
H (new-branch-1)
G
| D (branch-1)
| C
|/
B (master)
A

But your answer git rebase -i master doesn't make sense. Surely you would mean git rebase -i new-branch-1 and in the editor write

drop C
drop D
pick E
pick F

which would achieve the goal above.

(Your answer would result in):

F' (HEAD -> branch-2)
E'
| H (new-branch-1)
| G
|/ 
| D (branch-1)
| C
|/
B (master)
A
1

As answered, you can do this using --onto.

I find the git rebase --onto syntax quite confusing. So I created this script for rebasing "nested" branches: Github Gist

In your example, you would call:

moveBranch newBranch2 from newBranch1 to master

#!/bin/bash

## Places a branch to a new base. 
## Useful when splitting a long branch to multiple pull requests.
##
##   ---+--------master 
##       \
##         --- A ---- B
## 
## git-moveBranch.sh B from A to master
##
##   ---+-------- master ---- B
##       \
##         --- A 


function printUsageAndExit() {
    echo "Usage: moveBranch <branch> from <previous-base> to <new-base>";
    exit 1;
}

if [ 5 != $# ] ; then printUsageAndExit; fi
if [ "$2" != "from" ] ; then printUsageAndExit; fi
if [ "$4" != "to" ] ; then printUsageAndExit; fi

WHAT="$1"
FROM="$3"
ONTO="$5"

echo "Running:   git rebase —-onto=\"$ONTO\" \"$FROM\" \"$WHAT\""
# git rebase —-onto <place-to-put-it> <last-change-that-should-NOT-move> <change to move>
git rebase --onto "$ONTO" "$FROM" "$WHAT"

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