2

I tried to separate the declaration and definition of my templated member function of a templated class, but ended up with the following error and warning.

template <typename I>
class BigUnsigned{
    const size_t cell_size=sizeof(I);
    std::vector<I> _integers;
public:
    BigUnsigned();
    BigUnsigned(I);
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const BigUnsigned& bu);
};

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const BigUnsigned& bu){
    for (auto integer : bu._integers){
        out<<integer<<std::endl;
    }
    return out;
}

../hw06/bigunsigned.h:13:77: warning: friend declaration 'std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const BigUnsigned&)' declares a non-template function [-Wnon-template-friend] friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const BigUnsigned& bu); ^ ../hw06/bigunsigned.h:13:77: note: (if this is not what you intended, make sure the function template has already been declared and add <> after the function name here) ../hw06/bigunsigned.h:16:51: error: invalid use of template-name 'BigUnsigned' without an argument list std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const BigUnsigned& bu){ ^ ../hw06/bigunsigned.h: In function 'std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const int&)': ../hw06/bigunsigned.h:17:28: error: request for member '_integers' in 'bu', which is of non-class type 'const int' for (auto integer : bu._integers){ ^

When I joined the declaration and definition like this, everything compiles fine.

template <typename I>
class BigUnsigned{
    const size_t cell_size=sizeof(I);
    std::vector<I> _integers;
public:
    BigUnsigned();
    BigUnsigned(I);
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const BigUnsigned& bu){
        for (auto integer : bu._integers){
            out<<integer<<std::endl;
        }
        return out;
    }
};

The purpose was to print member variable _integers to cout. What might be the problem?

P.S.: Using this question I made the function free, but did not help.

9
  • FWIW, for me, it seems a little unexpected for BigUnsigned to be a container. Take that with the grain of salt, though.
    – erip
    Jan 21 '16 at 15:56
  • @erip, why do you think BigUnsigned is a container here? operator<< is a formatting operator. It has nothing to do with containers.
    – Jan Hudec
    Jan 21 '16 at 22:20
  • @JanHudec No, but to store data in a std::vector has everything to do with containers.
    – erip
    Jan 21 '16 at 22:21
  • @JanHudec BigUnsigned<std::string> bu{"Hello, World"}; /* oops, not really a big unsigned after all */
    – erip
    Jan 21 '16 at 22:24
  • @erip, you can't get an arbitrary precision without something of arbitrary size and that something is a vector. As for using std::string for the parameter, presumably the methods not shown require the parameter is a numeric type.
    – Jan Hudec
    Jan 21 '16 at 22:34
7

BigUnsigned is a template type so

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const BigUnsigned& bu)

Will not work as there is no BigUnsigned. You need to make the friend function a template so you can take different types of BigUnsigned<some_type>s.

template <typename I>
class BigUnsigned{
    const size_t cell_size=sizeof(I);
    std::vector<I> _integers;
public:
    BigUnsigned();
    BigUnsigned(I);
    template<typename T>
    friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const BigUnsigned<T>& bu);
};

template<typename T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const BigUnsigned<T>& bu){
    for (auto integer : bu._integers){
        out<<integer<<std::endl;
    }
    return out;
}

The reason the second example works is that since it is declared inside the class it uses the template type that the class uses.

1
  • @Slazer, actually, you don't want to make the template <typename T> std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const BigUnsigned<T>&) a friend of BigUnsigned<I> for unrelated I and T, so you don't want to prefix the friend declaration with typename. You only need to prefix the out-of-class definition; see R Sahu's answer.
    – Jan Hudec
    Jan 21 '16 at 22:19
4

A refinement to the answer by NathanOliver.

With the other answer, all instantiations of the function template are friends of all instatiations of the class template.

operator<< <int> is a friend of BigUnsigned<int> as well as BigUnsigned<double>.

operator<< <double> is a friend of BigUnsigned<double> as well as BigUnsigned<FooBar>.

You can change the declarations a little bit so that

operator<< <int> is a friend of BigUnsigned<int> but not of BigUnsigned<double>.

operator<< <double> is a friend of BigUnsigned<double> but not BigUnsigned<FooBar>.

// Forward declaration of the class template.
template <typename I> class BigUnsigned;

// Forward declaration of the function template
template <typename I>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const BigUnsigned<I>& bu);

// Change the friend-ship declaration in the class template.
template <typename I>
class BigUnsigned{
    const size_t cell_size=sizeof(I);
    std::vector<I> _integers;
public:
    BigUnsigned();
    BigUnsigned(I);

    // Grant friend-ship only to a specific instantiation of the
    // function template.
    friend std::ostream& operator<< <I>(std::ostream& out, const BigUnsigned<I>& bu);
};
6
  • Would you mind adding the possibility to define the friend function inline? Jan 21 '16 at 16:15
  • @phresnel, do you mean defining it inside the definition of BigUnsigned?
    – R Sahu
    Jan 21 '16 at 16:16
  • Yeah, sure, sometimes this makes things more maintainable. Jan 21 '16 at 16:23
  • @phresnel, you cannot implement the operator<< function inside the class template definition with my suggestion. It has to be implemented outside.
    – R Sahu
    Jan 21 '16 at 16:35
  • I just realise you were defining a free template function, too. Of course you are right; I'll add my solution as another answer. Jan 21 '16 at 16:48
1

To add a third variant that improves the readability a little bit, is to define the friend function inside the class:

#include <iostream>

template <typename T>
class Foo {
    int test = 42;

    // Note: 'Foo' inside the class body is basically a shortcut for 'Foo<T>'
    // Below line is identical to: friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream &os, Foo<T> const &foo)
    friend std::ostream& operator<< (std::ostream &os, Foo const &foo) {
        return os << foo.test;
    }
};


int main () {
    Foo<int> foo;
    std::cout << foo << '\n';
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.