72

I basically want to do this:

switch($someString.ToLower())
{
    "y", "yes" { "You entered Yes." }
    default { "You entered No." }
}
82
0
switch($someString.ToLower()) 
{ 
    {($_ -eq "y") -or ($_ -eq "yes")} { "You entered Yes." } 
    default { "You entered No." } 
}
| improve this answer | |
49
0

I found that this works and seems more readable:

switch($someString)
{
    { @("y", "yes") -contains $_ } { "You entered Yes." }
    default { "You entered No." }
}

The "-contains" operator performs a non-case sensitive search, so you don't need to use "ToLower()". If you do want it to be case sensitive, you can use "-ccontains" instead.

| improve this answer | |
43
0

You should be able to use a wildcard for your values:

switch -wildcard ($someString.ToLower())
{
    "y*" { "You entered Yes." }
    default { "You entered No." }
}

Regular expressions are also allowed.

switch -regex ($someString.ToLower())
{
    "y(es)?" { "You entered Yes." }
    default { "You entered No." }
}

PowerShell switch documentation: Using the Switch Statement

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is a great solution, although "technically" since I was asking to use separate values, I've marked fletcher as the answer. – Micah Aug 16 '10 at 14:41
  • 2
    Fair enough, although a different regular expression could probably do the same thing. – derekerdmann Aug 16 '10 at 14:48
  • 2
    Regex approach would be more concise. – mseery Aug 30 '10 at 3:25
  • 3
    You don't actually need the ToLower() because equality of strings is case insensitive by default in PowerShell. – dan-gph Sep 2 '13 at 23:52
7
0
switch($someString.ToLower())
{
    "yes"   { $_ = "y" }
    "y"     { "You entered Yes." }
    default { "You entered No." }
}

You can arbitrarily branch, cascade, and merge cases in this fashion, as long as the target case is located below/after the case or cases where the $_ variable is respectively reassigned.


n.b. As cute as this behavior is, it seems to reveal that the PowerShell interpreter is not implementing switch/case as efficiently as one might hope or assume. For one, stepping with the ISE debugger suggests that instead of optimized lookup, hashing, or binary branching, each case is tested in turn, like so many if-else statements. (If so, consider putting your most common cases first.) Also, as shown in this answer, PowerShell continues testing cases after having satisfied one. And cruelly enough, there even happens to be a special optimized 'switch' opcode available in .NET CIL which, because of this behavior, PowerShell can't take advantage of.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    It's not cute- it's documented. Add a break statement if you don't want subsequent branches evaluated. – Frank May 7 '17 at 0:13
  • 2
    @Frank Fair enough, "cute" may not have been the best word for referring to a keyword behavior that's altered or atypical vis-a-vis its historical semantics in numerous languages since 'C' (1975) or earlier. – Glenn Slayden May 11 '17 at 2:19
5
0

Supports entering y|ye|yes and case insensitive.

switch -regex ($someString.ToLower()) {
        "^y(es?)?$" {
            "You entered Yes." 
        }
        default { "You entered No." }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 13
    Actually, your expression "[yes]" matches any occurrence of the characters 'y', 'e', or 's' anywhere in $someString. Even if $someString is "no! no! no!s" that switch block will return "You entered Yes." because of the trailing 's'. To match y|ye|yes the expression should be "^y(es?)?$". – BACON May 24 '11 at 17:58
5
0

A slight modification to derekerdmann's post to meet the original request using regex's alternation operator "|"(pipe).

It's also slightly easier for regex newbies to understand and read.

Note that while using regex, if you don't put the start of string character "^"(caret/circumflex) and/or end of string character "$"(dollar) then you may get unexpected/unintuitive behavior (like matching "yesterday" or "why").

Putting grouping characters "()"(parentheses) around the options reduces the need to put start and end of string characters for each option. Without them, you'll get possibly unexpected behavior if you're not savvy with regex. Of course, if you're not processing user input, but rather some set of known strings, it will be more readable without grouping and start and end of string characters.

switch -regex ($someString) #many have noted ToLower() here is redundant
{
        #processing user input
    "^(y|yes|indubitably)$" { "You entered Yes." }

        # not processing user input
    "y|yes|indubitably" { "Yes was the selected string" } 
    default { "You entered No." } 
}
| improve this answer | |
-1
0

The switch doesn't appear to be case sensitive in PowerShell 5.1. All four of the $someString examples below work.

$someString = "YES"
$someString = "yes"
$someString = "yEs"
$someString = "y"

switch ($someString) {
   {"y","yes"} { "You entered Yes." }
   Default { "You didn't enter Yes."}
}

Here is my $PSVersionTable data.

Name                           Value
----                           -----
PSVersion                      5.1.17763.771
PSEdition                      Desktop
PSCompatibleVersions           {1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0...}
BuildVersion                   10.0.17763.771
CLRVersion                     4.0.30319.42000
WSManStackVersion              3.0
PSRemotingProtocolVersion      2.3
SerializationVersion           1.1.0.1
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    This is a wrong answer. Correct could be like: $a = 'b'; switch ($a) { {$_ -in 'a', 'b'} {'bingo'}; default {'nope!'} } – Mehrdad Mirreza Feb 13 at 11:00
-4
0

After searching a solution for the same problem like you, I've found this small topic here. In advance I got a much smoother solution for this switch, case statement

switch($someString) #switch is caseINsensitive, so you don't need to lower
{
    { 'y' -or 'yes' } { "You entered Yes." }
    default { "You entered No." }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    {'y' -or 'yes'} always evaluates to true so the default branch is never hit – Darren Gosbell Jul 15 '15 at 23:27

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