1
class Person {
var hello : (() -> Void)?
var name = "name"

init() {
    print("init \(self)")
}

deinit {
    print("deinit \(self)")
}
}

var person : Person!

person = Person()
person.hello = { () -> Void in
    print("\(person.name)")
}
person = nil

And the console output is:

init Person
deinit Person

In my opinion, because the 'person' is an optional, so Swift keeps a weak reference in the 'hello' closure, is that right?

2
  • Optionals aren't weakly stored. You'd need to declare person as weak if that's what you want. Weak objects, however, must be optionals. – MaddTheSane Jan 22 '16 at 2:46
  • This was not the original question, please don't transform it until you get all the answers. – Cristik Jan 22 '16 at 2:47
2

You don't get a retain cycle because the hello closure is capturing a variable, and not a constant, and because variables are expected to change in the future, it doesn't retain it, it just holds a reference to it.

Convert it to a constant and you'll obtain the expected retain cycle:

func test() {
    let html = Person()
    html.hello = { () -> Void in
        print("\(html.name)")
    }
}
test()

This prints only init Person, although when the functions ends, html goes out of scope and should be deallocated.

The behaviour is equivalent with the Objective-C one if you define the variable as __block.

1

Because html is an optional, your closure is actually holding a reference to the enum (Optional) not the object itself so there is only one reference to Person().

If you had created a situation where html actually went out of scope, then there would have been a lingering reference to the Person() object because the capture would be the only remaining reference to the html variable. But it would still not be the Person() object that has the reference count.

 class Person {
 var hello : (() -> Void)?
 var name = "name"

 init() {
     print("init \(self)")
 }

 deinit {
     print("deinit \(self)")
 }
 }

 repeat
 {
    var html : Person

    html = Person()
    // this closure keep a reference to 'html'
    html.hello = { () -> Void in
        print("\(html.name)")
    }

 } while false
7
  • Declaring a variable as optional doesn't affect the way it's retained. You're holding a reference to the Optional enum, which in turn is holding a reference to the boxed value, so you still get a retain. – Cristik Jan 22 '16 at 2:03
  • That's not what I was saying. What I was pointing out is that in the example code, the html variable has a refcount of 2 at some point but Person() never gets a refcount of more than 1. (same thing in my example BTW). – Alain T. Jan 22 '16 at 2:25
  • Got it, thanks, I misinterpreted the first phrase from your answer. – Cristik Jan 22 '16 at 2:46
  • When I add html = nil at the end of the while statement above, the person object will be released. And doesn't Swift automatically adds such code at the end of a scope? – noinput Jan 22 '16 at 4:04
  • it's not setting it to nil that does the release, it's the html variable going out of scope at the end of the block. try printing something before and after setting html to nil and you'll see when things actually happen. (i.e. you're deinit will only be called after the block is completed, so after any print() you do inside of the block.) – Alain T. Jan 22 '16 at 4:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.