14

I am aware of how to suppress compile warnings with CMake by doing (suppose I want to disable compile warning C4819):

set_target_properties(${PROJECT_NAME} PROPERTIES COMPILE_FLAGS "/wd4819")

So how to suppress link warnings with CMake (say LNK4099)?

7
  • What kind of link warning? Can you give examples?
    – usr1234567
    Commented Jan 22, 2016 at 6:12
  • 1
    @usr1234567 Updated the question. Commented Jan 22, 2016 at 6:12
  • Not the CMake way, but Microsofts suggests "You could also compile with /Z7, so the pdb doesn't need to be used, or remove the /DEBUG linker option if you do not have .pdb files for the objects you are linking." msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b7whw3f3.aspx
    – usr1234567
    Commented Jan 22, 2016 at 6:14
  • @usr1234567 It may work, but I do want to set it via CMake. In this way, there is no manual setup needed after CMake. Thanks for your help all the same. Commented Jan 22, 2016 at 6:17
  • @herohuyongtao: Any update here? You did not find a solution?
    – jpo38
    Commented May 24, 2016 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

22

Try this:

set_target_properties(${PROJECT_NAME} PROPERTIES LINK_FLAGS "/ignore:4099")

It worked perfectly for me with Visual Studio 2015.

3

Another way to ignore linker warnings for all the targets in the current scope in CMake is by settings CMAKE_EXE_LINKER_FLAGS, CMAKE_SHARED_LINKER_FLAGS, CMAKE_STATIC_LINKER_FLAGS as it follows:

# Ignore warnings about missing pdb
set(CMAKE_EXE_LINKER_FLAGS "${CMAKE_EXE_LINKER_FLAGS} /ignore:4099")
set(CMAKE_SHARED_LINKER_FLAGS "${CMAKE_SHARED_LINKER_FLAGS} /ignore:4099")
set(CMAKE_STATIC_LINKER_FLAGS "${CMAKE_STATIC_LINKER_FLAGS} /ignore:4099")

It also exists a CMAKE_MODULE_LINKER_FLAGS, but it seems not related to C++ projects.

1

In case your library depends on some another library that doesn't have PDBs, you may want to add ignore flag only once instead of adding it to each executable. Consider the following:

add_library(my_lib my_lib.cpp)

find_library(EXT_LIBRARY no_pdb.lib REQUIRED)
target_link_libraries(my_lib PUBLIC ${EXT_LIBRARY})

add_executable(my_exe1 "src/exe1.cpp")
target_link_libraries(my_exe1 PUBLIC my_lib)

add_executable(my_exe2 "src/exe2.cpp")
target_link_libraries(my_exe2 PUBLIC my_lib)

So now both my_exe1 and my_exe2 cause LNK4099 error. To fix this, instead of doing this on the executable level like this:

set_target_properties(my_exe1 PROPERTIES LINK_FLAGS "/ignore:4099")
set_target_properties(my_exe2 PROPERTIES LINK_FLAGS "/ignore:4099")

You may want to add ignore flag to your library's interface only once:

target_link_options(my_lib INTERFACE "/ignore:4099")

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