3

How should I properly update component if it doesn't have a parent?

I've found two ways to do it:

First method

Here I update component through changing component`s state:

var Hello = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    if (!this.state) return null;
    return (
      <div>Hello {this.state.name}</div>
    );
  }
});


var component = ReactDOM.render(
  <Hello />,
  document.getElementById('container')
);
component.setState({name: "World"});

setTimeout(function(){
  component.setState({name: "StackOverFlow"});
}, 1000);

Second method

Here I update component through ReactDOM.render method:

var Hello = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
      <div>Hello {this.props.name}</div>
    );
  }
});


ReactDOM.render(
  <Hello name="world"/>,
    document.getElementById('container')
);

setTimeout(function(){
  ReactDOM.render(
    <Hello name="StackOverFlow"/>,
      document.getElementById('container')
  );

}, 1000);

So which method is correct? Or maybe here is a third, correct way?

3
  • It's not possible. If you need to update something outside a component then do it via props. Jan 22, 2016 at 7:42
  • 1
    It's possible: jsfiddle
    – mqklin
    Jan 22, 2016 at 7:49
  • Weird. Well it's for sure an anti-pattern then - it makes reasoning about the component's state completely impossible just looking at the component. Jan 22, 2016 at 7:57

3 Answers 3

4

If you simply want to trigger a re-render from outside the component, its forceUpdate method is exposed.

The initial ReactDOM.render returns a reference to the component, which you can use:

const component = ReactDOM.render(<MyComponent />)

component.forceUpdate()
2
  • 1
    I am creating a component using ReactDOM.render(component, document.querySelector(this.tootlipSelector)). Object returned does not have the forceUpdate method defined...
    – Nishant
    May 22, 2018 at 7:56
  • 1
    render() returns null for stateless components
    – Rustam
    Apr 27, 2021 at 12:01
1

It's an anti-pattern: if you do that, it becomes impossible to reason about the state of the component just looking at the component, which is part of the philosophy (as I understand it) behind React.

The correct way is to modify the props of the component and it could react to the prop change by setting a new state within componentWillReceiveProps prior to rendering:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  componentWillReceiveProps (nextProps) {
    if(make sure that props have actually changed) { // https://facebook.github.io/react/blog/2016/01/08/A-implies-B-does-not-imply-B-implies-A.html
      this.setState({
        // set your new state using some calculation based on the props
        // this will not result in an extra render
      });
    }
  },
  render () {
    return <div>Hello {this.state ? this.state.name : "Loading..."}</div>;
  }
}
7
  • It's possible, I've added example to the question.
    – mqklin
    Jan 22, 2016 at 7:56
  • @mqklin yes I saw. I updated my answer. You still shouldn't do it even though I guess it is possible. Jan 22, 2016 at 7:58
  • But how can I pass props to the component if it's already rendered? For example if I want to do some server request and pass response to the rendered component (there should be "Loading..." text before that)?
    – mqklin
    Jan 22, 2016 at 8:05
  • Two options: there should be a parent component, or you can do the server request within the component. Jan 22, 2016 at 8:06
  • 1
    But React is not a MVC. You need to think in React. Jan 22, 2016 at 8:45
0

Calling ReactDOM.render ideally should only be called once upon application bootstrapping. If you see yourself calling it more than once, you're probably doing something "wrong".

As for exact advice on how to do things, it depends on the type of project and/or architecture you have.

If you're just beginning to experiment with React and haven't decided 100% that you are going to use a Flux architecture (somewhat of an advanced topic) I find it really useful to start off just building things.

The only thing(s) you need to keep in mind, is where does a piece of data live? state, props, or calculated on the fly?

The answer depends on a lot of stuff, but usually, it's best to calculate data on the fly as much as possible, put stuff in props, and as a last resort, put stuff in state.

Here's a contrived example:

//client.js
const render = require('react-dom').render;
const App = require('./components/App.jsx');

render(<App />, document.querySelector('#app-container'));


//components/App.jsx
const React = require('react');
const request = require('superagent');

module.exports = React.createClass(
    displayName: 'HelloUserApp',

    getInitialState() {
        return {
            firstName: null,
            lastName: null
        };
    },

    componentDidMount() {
        this.setState({
            isFetchingName: true
        });

        request.get('/users/self')
               .end((err, res) => {
                   this.setState({isFetchingName: false});
                   this.setState(res.user);
               });
    }


    render() {
        return (
            <div className="greeting">
                {this.state.isFetchingName ? 'Loading...' : this.state.firstName + ' ' + this.state.lastName}
            </div>
        );

    }
);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.