I am trying to learn Angular 2.

I would like to access to a child component from a parent component using the @ViewChild Annotation.

Here some lines of code:

In BodyContent.ts I have:

import {ViewChild, Component, Injectable} from 'angular2/core';
import {FilterTiles} from '../Components/FilterTiles/FilterTiles';


@Component({
selector: 'ico-body-content'
, templateUrl: 'App/Pages/Filters/BodyContent/BodyContent.html'
, directives: [FilterTiles] 
})


export class BodyContent {
    @ViewChild(FilterTiles) ft:FilterTiles;

    public onClickSidebar(clickedElement: string) {
        console.log(this.ft);
        var startingFilter = {
            title: 'cognomi',
            values: [
                'griffin'
                , 'simpson'
            ]}
        this.ft.tiles.push(startingFilter);
    } 
}

while in FilterTiles.ts:

 import {Component} from 'angular2/core';


 @Component({
     selector: 'ico-filter-tiles'
    ,templateUrl: 'App/Pages/Filters/Components/FilterTiles/FilterTiles.html'
 })


 export class FilterTiles {
     public tiles = [];

     public constructor(){};
 }

Finally here the templates (as suggested in comments):

BodyContent.html

<div (click)="onClickSidebar()" class="row" style="height:200px; background-color:red;">
        <ico-filter-tiles></ico-filter-tiles>
    </div>

FilterTiles.html

<h1>Tiles loaded</h1>
<div *ngFor="#tile of tiles" class="col-md-4">
     ... stuff ...
</div>

FilterTiles.html template is correctly loaded into ico-filter-tiles tag (indeed I am able to see the header).

Note: the BodyContent class is injected inside another template (Body) using DynamicComponetLoader: dcl.loadAsRoot(BodyContent, '#ico-bodyContent', injector):

import {ViewChild, Component, DynamicComponentLoader, Injector} from 'angular2/core';
import {Body}                 from '../../Layout/Dashboard/Body/Body';
import {BodyContent}          from './BodyContent/BodyContent';

@Component({
    selector: 'filters'
    , templateUrl: 'App/Pages/Filters/Filters.html'
    , directives: [Body, Sidebar, Navbar]
})


export class Filters {

    constructor(dcl: DynamicComponentLoader, injector: Injector) {
       dcl.loadAsRoot(BodyContent, '#ico-bodyContent', injector);
       dcl.loadAsRoot(SidebarContent, '#ico-sidebarContent', injector);

   } 
}

The problem is that when I try to write ft into the console log, I get undefined, and of course I get an exception when I try to push something inside the "tiles" array: 'no property tiles for "undefined"'.

One more thing: FilterTiles component seems to be correctly loaded, since I'm able to see the html template for it.

Any suggestion? Thanks

  • Looks correct. Maybe something with the template, but it isn't included in your question. – Günter Zöchbauer Jan 22 '16 at 12:54
  • 1
    Agreed with Günter. I created a plunkr with your code and simple associated templates and it works. See this link: plnkr.co/edit/KpHp5Dlmppzo1LXcutPV?p=preview. We need the templates ;-) – Thierry Templier Jan 22 '16 at 13:01
  • 1
    ft wouldn't be set in the constructor, but in a click event handler it would be set already. – Günter Zöchbauer Jan 22 '16 at 13:11
  • 4
    You're using loadAsRoot, which has a known issue with change detection. Just to make sure try using loadNextToLocation or loadIntoLocation. – Eric Martinez Jan 22 '16 at 13:26
  • The problem was loadAsRoot. Once I replaced with loadIntoLocation the problem was solved. If you make your comment as answer I can mark it as accepted – Andrea Ialenti Jan 22 '16 at 15:31

13 Answers 13

up vote 200 down vote accepted

I had a similar issue and thought I'd post in case someone else made the same mistake. First, one thing to consider is AfterViewInit; you need to wait for the view to be initialized before you can access your @ViewChild. However, my @ViewChild was still returning null. The problem was my *ngIf. The *ngIf directive was killing my controls component so I couldn't reference it.

import {Component, ViewChild, OnInit, AfterViewInit} from 'angular2/core';
import {ControlsComponent} from './controls/controls.component';
import {SlideshowComponent} from './slideshow/slideshow.component';

@Component({
    selector: 'app',
    template:  `
        <controls *ngIf="controlsOn"></controls>
        <slideshow (mousemove)="onMouseMove()"></slideshow>
    `,
    directives: [SlideshowComponent, ControlsComponent]
})

export class AppComponent {
    @ViewChild(ControlsComponent) controls:ControlsComponent;

    controlsOn:boolean = false;

    ngOnInit() {
        console.log('on init', this.controls);
        // this returns undefined
    }

    ngAfterViewInit() {
        console.log('on after view init', this.controls);
        // this returns null
    }

    onMouseMove(event) {
         this.controls.show();
         // throws an error because controls is null
    }
}

Hope that helps.

EDIT
As mentioned by @Ashg below, a solution is to use @ViewChildren instead of @ViewChild.

  • 8
    @kenecaswell So did you find the better way to solve the problem. I am also facing the same issue. I have many *ngIf so that element will be in the only after all true, but i need the element reference. Any way to solve this > – monica Sep 23 '16 at 6:59
  • 2
    I found that child component is 'undefined' in ngAfterViewInit() if using ngIf. I tried putting long timeouts but still no effect. However, the child component is available later (ie in response to click events etc). If I don't use ngIf and it is defined as expected in ngAfterViewInit(). There's more on Parent / Child communication here angular.io/docs/ts/latest/cookbook/… – Matthew Hegarty Sep 30 '16 at 14:52
  • 2
    I used bootstrap ngClass+hidden class instead of ngIf. That worked. Thanks! – Rahmathullah M Apr 2 '17 at 17:47
  • 5
    This doesn't solve the problem, use the solution below using @ViewChildren go get a reference to the child control once it becomes available – Ashg May 16 '17 at 2:48
  • 3
    This just proves the "issue", right? It does not post a solution. – Miguel Ribeiro Feb 9 at 11:36

The issue as previously mentioned is the ngIf which is causing the view to be undefined. The answer is to use ViewChildren instead of ViewChild. I had similar issue where I didn't want a grid to be shown until all the reference data had been loaded.

html:

   <section class="well" *ngIf="LookupData != null">
       <h4 class="ra-well-title">Results</h4>
       <kendo-grid #searchGrid> </kendo-grid>
   </section>

Component Code

import { Component, ViewChildren, OnInit, AfterViewInit, QueryList  } from '@angular/core';
import { GridComponent } from '@progress/kendo-angular-grid';

export class SearchComponent implements OnInit, AfterViewInit
{
    //other code emitted for clarity

    @ViewChildren("searchGrid")
    public Grids: QueryList<GridComponent>

    private SearchGrid: GridComponent

    public ngAfterViewInit(): void
    {

        this.Grids.changes.subscribe((comps: QueryList <GridComponent>) =>
        {
            this.SearchGrid = comps.first;
        });


    }
}

Here we are using ViewChildren on which you can listen for changes. In this case any children with the reference #searchGrid. Hope this helps.

  • 1
    I would like add that in some cases when you try change eg. this.SearchGrid properties you should use syntax like setTimeout(()=>{ ///your code here }, 1); to avoid Exception: Expression has changed after it was checked – rafalkasa Apr 12 '17 at 19:58
  • 2
    How do you do this if you want to place your #searchGrid tag on a normal HTML element instead of an Angular2 element? (For instance, <div #searchGrid></div> and this is inside of an *ngIf block? – Vern Jensen May 31 '17 at 3:56
  • this is the correct answer for my use case! Thanks I need to access an component as it comes available through ngIf= – Frozen_byte Jul 21 '17 at 13:04
  • this works perfect on ajax responses, now the *ngIfworks, and after render we can save a ElementRef from the dinamic components. – elporfirio Oct 24 '17 at 16:09
  • Also don't forget to assign it to a subscription and then unSubscribe from it – tam.teixeira Dec 11 '17 at 2:41

You could use a setter for @ViewChild()

@ViewChild(FilterTiles) set ft(tiles: FilterTiles) {
    console.log(tiles);
);

If you have an ngIf wrapper, the setter will be called with undefined, and then again with a reference once ngIf allows it to render.

My issue was something else though. I had not included the module containing my "FilterTiles" in my app.modules. The template didn't throw an error but the reference was always undefined.

  • 1
    Syntax is wrong. It must { } – Ziggler Mar 22 at 21:01
  • 1
    Thank you. Turns out I needed to import/declare a component in my test! – Edmond C Apr 16 at 19:13
  • This isn't working for me--I get the first undefined, but I don't get the second call w/ the reference. App is an ng2...is this ng4+ feature? – Jay Cummins Jul 20 at 18:55
  • @Jay I believe this is because you have not registered the component with Angular, in this case FilterTiles. I've encountered that issue for that reason before. – parliament Jul 27 at 16:13

This worked for me.

My component named 'my-component', for example, was displayed using *ngIf="showMe" like so:

<my-component [showMe]="showMe" *ngIf="showMe"></my-component>

So, when the component is initialized the component is not yet displayed until "showMe" is true. Thus, my @ViewChild references were all undefined.

This is where I used @ViewChildren and the QueryList that it returns. See angular article on QueryList and a @ViewChildren usage demo.

You can use the QueryList that @ViewChildren returns and subscribe to any changes to the referenced items using rxjs as seen below. @ViewChid does not have this ability.

import { Component, ViewChildren, ElementRef, OnChanges, QueryList, Input } from '@angular/core';
import 'rxjs/Rx';

@Component({
    selector: 'my-component',
    templateUrl: './my-component.component.html',
    styleUrls: ['./my-component.component.css']
})
export class MyComponent implements OnChanges {

  @ViewChildren('ref') ref: QueryList<any>; // this reference is just pointing to a template reference variable in the component html file (i.e. <div #ref></div> )
  @Input() showMe; // this is passed into my component from the parent as a    

  ngOnChanges () { // ngOnChanges is a component LifeCycle Hook that should run the following code when there is a change to the components view (like when the child elements appear in the DOM for example)
    if(showMe) // this if statement checks to see if the component has appeared becuase ngOnChanges may fire for other reasons
      this.ref.changes.subscribe( // subscribe to any changes to the ref which should change from undefined to an actual value once showMe is switched to true (which triggers *ngIf to show the component)
        (result) => {
          // console.log(result.first['_results'][0].nativeElement);                                         
          console.log(result.first.nativeElement);                                          

          // Do Stuff with referenced element here...   
        } 
      ); // end subscribe
    } // end if
  } // end onChanges 
} // end Class

Hope this helps somebody save some time and frustration.

  • 1
    Just noticed Ashg's answer was pretty much the same as mine. Oh well. – Joshua Dyck Dec 20 '16 at 4:17
  • 1
    Indeed you solution seems to be the best approach listed so far. NOTE We have to keep in mind that top 73 solution is now DEPRECATED... since directive:[...] declaration is NO longer supported in Angular 4. IOW it WON'T work in Angular 4 scenario – PeteZaria Jul 31 '17 at 14:07
  • 3
    Don't forget to unsubscribe, or use .take(1).subscribe(), but excellent answer, thank you so much! – Blair Connolly Feb 8 at 20:36
  • Excellent solution. I have subscribed to the ref changes in ngAfterViewInit() rather than the ngOnChanges(). But I had to add a setTimeout to get rid of ExpressionChangedAfterChecked error – Josf Feb 9 at 0:18

My workaround was to use [style.display]="getControlsOnStyleDisplay()" instead of *ngIf="controlsOn". The block is there but it is not displayed.

@Component({
selector: 'app',
template:  `
    <controls [style.display]="getControlsOnStyleDisplay()"></controls>
...

export class AppComponent {
  @ViewChild(ControlsComponent) controls:ControlsComponent;

  controlsOn:boolean = false;

  getControlsOnStyleDisplay() {
    if(this.controlsOn) {
      return "block";
    } else {
      return "none";
    }
  }
....
  • Have a page where a list of items is shown in a table, or the edit item is shown, based on the value of showList variable. Got rid of the annoying console error by using the [style.display]="!showList", combined with *ngIf="!showList". – razvanone Apr 23 at 10:59

It must work.

But as Günter Zöchbauer said there must be some other problem in template. I have created kinda Relevant-Plunkr-Answer. Pleas do check browser's console.

boot.ts

@Component({
selector: 'my-app'
, template: `<div> <h1> BodyContent </h1></div>

      <filter></filter>

      <button (click)="onClickSidebar()">Click Me</button>
  `
, directives: [FilterTiles] 
})


export class BodyContent {
    @ViewChild(FilterTiles) ft:FilterTiles;

    public onClickSidebar() {
        console.log(this.ft);

        this.ft.tiles.push("entered");
    } 
}

filterTiles.ts

@Component({
     selector: 'filter',
    template: '<div> <h4>Filter tiles </h4></div>'
 })


 export class FilterTiles {
     public tiles = [];

     public constructor(){};
 }

It works like a charm. Please double check your tags and references.

Thanks...

  • If the problem is the same as mine, to duplicate you would need to put a *ngIf in the template around <filter></filter>.. Apparently if the ngIf returns false, ViewChild doesn't get wired and returns null – Dan Chase May 11 at 18:31

My solution to this was to move the ngIf from outside of the child component to inside of the child component on a div that wrapped the whole section of html. That way it was still getting hidden when it needed to be, but was able to load the component and I could reference it in the parent.

  • But for that, how did you get to your "visible" variable that was in the parent? – Dan Chase May 11 at 18:32

This works for me, see the example below.

import {Component, ViewChild, ElementRef} from 'angular2/core';

@Component({
    selector: 'app',
    template:  `
        <a (click)="toggle($event)">Toggle</a>
        <div *ngIf="visible">
          <input #control name="value" [(ngModel)]="value" type="text" />
        </div>
    `,
})

export class AppComponent {

    private elementRef: ElementRef;
    @ViewChild('control') set controlElRef(elementRef: ElementRef) {
      this.elementRef = elementRef;
    }

    visible:boolean;

    toggle($event: Event) {
      this.visible = !this.visible;
      if(this.visible) {
        setTimeout(() => { this.elementRef.nativeElement.focus(); });
      }
    }

}

My solution to this was to replace *ngIf with [hidden]. Downside was all the child components were present in the code DOM. But worked for my requirements.

I had a similar issue, where the ViewChild was inside of a switch clause that wasn't loading the viewChild element before it was being referenced. I solved it in a semi-hacky way but wrapping the ViewChild reference in a setTimeout that executed immediately (i.e. 0ms)

In my case, I knew the child component would always be present, but wanted to alter the state prior to the child initializing to save work.

I choose to test for the child until it appeared and make changes immediately, which saved me a change cycle on the child component.

export class GroupResultsReportComponent implements OnInit {

    @ViewChild(ChildComponent) childComp: ChildComponent;

    ngOnInit(): void {
        this.WhenReady(() => this.childComp, () => { this.childComp.showBar = true; });
    }

    /**
     * Executes the work, once the test returns truthy
     * @param test a function that will return truthy once the work function is able to execute 
     * @param work a function that will execute after the test function returns truthy
     */
    private WhenReady(test: Function, work: Function) {
        if (test()) work();
        else setTimeout(this.WhenReady.bind(window, test, work));
    }
}

Alertnatively, you could add a max number of attempts or add a few ms delay to the setTimeout. setTimeout effectively throws the function to the bottom of the list of pending operations.

In my case, I had an input variable setter using the ViewChild, and the ViewChild was inside of an *ngIf directive, so the setter was trying to access it before the *ngIf rendered (it would work fine without the *ngIf, but would not work if it was always set to true with *ngIf="true").

To solve, I used Rxjs to make sure any reference to the ViewChild waited until the view was initiated. First, create a Subject that completes when after view init.

export class MyComponent implements AfterViewInit {
  private _viewInitWaiter$ = new Subject();

  ngAfterViewInit(): void {
    this._viewInitWaiter$.complete();
  }
}

Then, create a function that takes executes a lambda after the subject completes.

private _executeAfterViewInit(func: () => any): any {
  this._viewInitWaiter$.subscribe(null, null, () => {
    return func();
  })
}

Finally, make sure references to the ViewChild use this function.

@Input()
set myInput(val: any) {
    this.executeAfterViewInit(() => {
        const viewChildProperty = this.viewChild.someProperty;
        ...
    });
}

@ViewChild('viewChildRefName', {read: MyViewChildComponent}) viewChild: MyViewChildComponent;

I fix it just adding SetTimeout after set visible the component

My HTML:

<input #txtBus *ngIf[show]>

My Component JS

@Component({
  selector: "app-topbar",
  templateUrl: "./topbar.component.html",
  styleUrls: ["./topbar.component.scss"]
})
export class TopbarComponent implements OnInit {

  public show:boolean=false;

  @ViewChild("txtBus") private inputBusRef: ElementRef;

  constructor() {

  }

  ngOnInit() {}

  ngOnDestroy(): void {

  }


  showInput() {
    this.show = true;
    setTimeout(()=>{
      this.inputBusRef.nativeElement.focus();
    },500);
  }
}

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