10

I need to create an Ansible playbook to delete the *.web files in a specific directory only if the files exists.

OS : cent OS, Redhat 5x, 6x.

I have tried the following with no success:

 - stat: path=/opt/app/jboss/configuration/*.web
   register: web
 - shell: rm -rf /opt/app/jboss/configuration/*.web
   when: web.stat.exists
2
  • What error are you getting? Why test for existence before deleting? – helloV Jan 22 '16 at 16:47
  • Sorry, It was my error. I have multiple requirements like mv ,cp and rm *.web only if files exists. I have validated mv and cp *web and it was failed and aborting with no such file or directory...Just noticed rm is silently completing without error. – miki Jan 24 '16 at 14:27
21

@bruce-p's answer gives a deprecation warning with Ansible 2.0+, but the new with_fileglob gives another option:

- file: path={{ item }} state=absent
  with_fileglob: /opt/app/jboss/configuration/*.web

(Similar question remove all files containing a certain name within a directory has a similar answer.)

EDIT: As noted below, that won't work; here's an example of "the fancy way":

- find:
    paths: /opt/app/jboss/configuration
    patterns: "*.web"
  register: find_results

- file:
    path: "{{ item['path'] }}"
    state: absent
  with_items: "{{ find_results['files'] }}"
2
  • 3
    This will not work since with_fileglob only matches files on the system which is running ansible, not the target host. – Bert Hekman Mar 14 '17 at 13:38
  • Hmm, you're right! @bruce-p's remark "If you really want to get fancy you could use the find module to locate all the files that match your pattern and then invoke the rm command (or better yet use the file module and set state=absent) using a with_items loop to loop over what find returns." is the clean way to do this, I guess -- edited to include an example of that. – Josh Smift Jun 14 '17 at 17:09
3

The stat module does not work with wildcards, so the first task will not do what you expect. Most Ansible modules do not support *, ?, etc. wildcards in their parameters unless explicitly documented that they do. The reason for this is that wildcard expansion is typically handled by your login shell (bash, zsh, etc), so unless the application explicitly supports it then it won't recognize them.

Here's an easy way to verify this:

tasks:
  - stat: path=/etc/*.conf
    register: foo

  - debug: var=foo

  - stat: path=/etc/resolv.conf
    register: bar

  - debug: var=bar

The output of this is:

ok: [localhost] => {
    "var": {
        "foo": {
            "changed": false,
            "invocation": {
                "module_args": "path=/etc/*.conf",
                "module_complex_args": {},
                "module_name": "stat"
            },
            "stat": {
                "exists": false
            }
        }
    }
}

TASK: [stat path=/etc/resolv.conf] ********************************************
ok: [localhost]

TASK: [debug var=bar] *********************************************************
ok: [localhost] => {
    "var": {
        "bar": {
            "changed": false,
            "invocation": {
                "module_args": "path=/etc/resolv.conf",
                "module_complex_args": {},
                "module_name": "stat"
            },
            "stat": {
                "atime": 1446665095.0724516,
                "checksum": "fd75f8cc67e4879fa546cbbd901b211bcb7e1b5e",
                "ctime": 1446840004.4182615,
                "dev": 51713,
                "exists": true,
                "gid": 0,
                "gr_name": "root",
                "inode": 146096,
                "isblk": false,
                "ischr": false,
                "isdir": false,
                "isfifo": false,
                "isgid": false,
                "islnk": false,
                "isreg": true,
                "issock": false,
                "isuid": false,
                "md5": "a56ca5f7379429d3b358ce922b28039b",
                "mode": "0644",
                "mtime": 1446840004.4182615,
                "nlink": 1,
                "path": "/etc/resolv.conf",
                "pw_name": "root",
                "rgrp": true,
                "roth": true,
                "rusr": true,
                "size": 94,
                "uid": 0,
                "wgrp": false,
                "woth": false,
                "wusr": true,
                "xgrp": false,
                "xoth": false,
                "xusr": false
            }
        }
    }
}

Note that when you specify a single file it returns the results for that file, but when you specify a wildcard it basically returns nothing.

As @udondan implied in his answer, you can just do something like this:

- shell: rm -rf /opt/app/jboss/configuration/*.web

Since rm will silently complete without error if there are 0 matches.

If you really want to get fancy you could use the find module to locate all the files that match your pattern and then invoke the rm command (or better yet use the file module and set state=absent) using a with_items loop to loop over what find returns.

2
  • Thanks for the explanation , Just noticed rm is silently completing without error... I have the same scenario to mv or cp *.web only if files exists. Please let me know the suggestion , I tried find but it is throwing no such file or directory error. – miki Jan 24 '16 at 14:11
  • I have tried - shell: find /opt/app/jboss/configuration/ -name "*.web" -print0 | xargs -0 -I {} mv {} /backup and it is working as excepted. Thanks! – miki Jan 24 '16 at 18:04
2

rm -rf does not care if the files exist or not. It will not complain. If the files exist they will be removed. If not, well, then not. But the outcome is the same: same status code, no output. No need to deal with that on Ansible level then.

1
  • Only Ansible will complain: [WARNING]: Consider using file module with state=absent rather than running rm – dokaspar Jun 9 '17 at 8:11

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