1

Swift (or at least Xcode) seems to be pretty smart about recommending let vs var when creating variables which aren't going to change - and even the special _ variable name.

But for a lot of those let variables, we're only creating them for the purposes of passing them into another function. Why wouldn't we just put the "right side" of that assignment in its place.

So, instead of:

if let url = NSURL(string: "http://xyzapi.com") {
  if let data = NSData(contentsOfURL: url) {
    self.myArray.append(data)
  }
}

...we could just say:

if let data = NSData(contentsOfURL: NSURL(string: "http://xyzapi.com")!) {
  self.myArray.append(data)
}

I've tried this and it seems to work just fine. But every example, tutorial, bit of sample code, etc. has every-single-step create (and unwrap) its own variable - even for things that are impossible to be empty (like the hard-coded string "xyzapi.com").

Please don't get caught up in the exact example. This isn't a question about NSData or NSURL but the idea of creating so many useless variables.

In other languages, I've tended to not create variables in live/production code unless I needed them. Is there something special about Swift that makes it OK or it is (probably) just because I'm looking at tutorials?

7
  • 3
    I think the purpose of creating it in steps is because it's more clear of what's happening to the user. Imagine a tutorial with most codes created in 1 line. That wouldn't be really clear and won't help the user understand what's actually happening. That being said, this question shouldn't be asked here. – Eendje Jan 22 '16 at 19:23
  • EricD: I'm hoping that there is a third option. I'm sure there's going to be SOME opinion in there but I'm also hoping that someone will know that wasting memory by creating more variables is OK nowadays. Thank you, @Eendje. Do you keep it that way (each line creating a new variable) in Production code or do you reduce the number of variables, like I'm used to doing in other languages? I know, that'll probably be an opinion. – Steve Barron Jan 22 '16 at 19:28
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    BTW these tutorial it is not trustworthy. It should never teach you how to download your data synchronously. – Leo Dabus Jan 22 '16 at 19:28
  • 1
    Steve, the fundamental answers are that (a) for at least 20 years now the ONLY, SOLE, ONLY issue in software engineering is production reliability. Indeed as a matter of course, you always prefer longer, more 'long-winded' tedious code, over natty compact code. compact code is completely out, you never, ever, ever, ever try to write compact code. this is a case of that principal "writ large", ie the actual language is designed like that! (b) basically regarding the specific "let" issue, the whole point is it completely avoids the case of missing, empty, etc., variables. – Fattie Jan 22 '16 at 19:44
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    @SteveBarron I tend to cramp as much code in one line as possible IF it makes the code look more clear AND it's 100% safe ;) Those IF's and AND's are very important to me. – Eendje Jan 22 '16 at 19:46
1

I can also imagine another reason: When debugging, you may look up the contents of local variables and constants. When creating the NSURL instance, it also might throw an exception or be unuseable in some way.

I found myself creating "unnecessary" variables too, just to ceate code that's easier to understand and easier to debug.

If you don't document why you do things, the next worst you can do is something "unnamed".

2

This is largely a question of style (and thus prone to closing as opinion-based), but to attempt to be helpful regardless...

There is little difference at run time between the options you present. What this is really about is two questions:

Do you want to code defensively?

NSURL.init(string:) is a failable initializer — not every string is a valid URL, so that API makes you consider how to handle the case of passing a string that is not a valid URL. Likewise, NSData.init(contentsOfURL:) can fail for any number of reasons, so you need to be prepared for a nil result.

Now, your preparation for possible failure may just be to ignore it (i.e. do nothing when the result is nil) or to let your app crash. So in some sense this question is moot — Swift requires at least a basic level of defensive programming in requiring you to handle the case of empty optionals, whether through if-let, guard-let, optional chaining or force unwrapping.

If you're coding defensively, how do you want to handle failure?

So once you're coding defensively, you need to decide just how defensive you want to be. What assumptions are you going in with, and how fast do you want to cling to those assumptions?

For the first case in your example, there's the issue of NSURL.init(string:) failing when the input string is not a valid URL. You're passing a constant string literal, so presumably you know (or you'll find out very quickly during development) whether you have a valid URL. And you definitely know that the validity of that URL will never change at run time in your shipping app.

As such, you're entirely justified in force-unwrapping the result (the ! in NSURL(string: "http://xyzapi.com")!). Even though force-unwrapping will cause your app to crash if the optional is nil, the very reason force-unwrapping exists is to allow you to cut down on boilerplate in cases where you can assert a truth that the compiler cannot.

Now, some developers consider Force Unwrap to be a Dark Side power and insist on eschewing it in all cases. That's why you see tutorials that do things like this:

if let url = NSURL(string: "http://xyzapi.com") {
    // ...
}

There is an upside to this approach, in that while the force-unwrap will crash in the case where your string contains an invalid URL, the if-let will not.

But there remains the question of whether that's actually a desirable upside. This example doesn't do anything else in the case of NSURL.init(string:) failure... so whatever was in between the braces doesn't happen, and whatever is supposed to happen after the braces continues on regardless. This may lead to other things going wrong in your app later, and you won't know why.

With a force-unwrap, you know exactly where the failure is because you crash there, and because you're force-unwrapping something that's constant at compile time, you can assert that one fix to the constant string literal will be good for all cases.

If you're pedantic enough to avoid force-unwrapping, you should also be pedantic enough to actually handle your errors. That is, you should do this:

if let url = NSURL(string: "http://xyzapi.com") {
    // use url
} else {
    // do something about the fact that there's no url
}

Or this:

guard let url = NSURL(string: "http://xyzapi.com") 
    else { /* do something about no url */ }
// use url
0

In the second example, you are force unwrapping the url optional, while in the first one, your conditionally unbinding it,

Moreover,

In the first example, you can differentiate which one is filing. Is it creating the url object. Or is creating the data object

-1
if let x = something { 

}

performs an unwrapping of the variable inside the if statement, so you can use it without ! or ?. This is generally safer and cleaner than using ! or ?, but not always.

For example

var x: Int? = nil

if let y = x {
    // Code will not be done
}

x = 3

if let y = x {
    // y will have a value of 3 and you won't need to use ! or ? to access it.
}
2
  • The = nil in var x: Int? = nil is redundant since it's already nil :p – Eendje Jan 22 '16 at 19:51
  • Haha touche! I was overly explicit – Ajwhiteway Jan 22 '16 at 19:58

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