I'm trying to pass a parameter in the onclick event. Below is a sample code:

<div id="div"></div>

<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">
   var div = document.getElementById('div');

   for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
       var link = document.createElement('a');
       link.setAttribute('href', '#');
       link.innerHTML = i + '';
       link.onclick=  function() { onClickLink(i+'');};
       div.appendChild(link);
       div.appendChild(document.createElement('BR'));
       }

   function onClickLink(text) {
       alert('Link ' + text + ' clicked');
       return false;
       }
    </script>

However whenever I click on any of the links the alert always shows 'Link 10 clicked'!

Can anyone tell me what I'm doing wrong?

Thanks

up vote 52 down vote accepted

This happens because the i propagates up the scope once the function is invoked. You can avoid this issue using a closure.

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
   var link = document.createElement('a');
   link.setAttribute('href', '#');
   link.innerHTML = i + '';
   link.onclick = (function() {
      var currentI = i;
      return function() { 
          onClickLink(currentI + '');
      }
   })();
   div.appendChild(link);
   div.appendChild(document.createElement('BR'));
}

Or if you want more concise syntax, I suggest you use Nick Craver's solution.

  • Thanks, it's working now! – fatcatz Aug 16 '10 at 18:06
  • Awesome description of this Jamie! – Dave G Oct 5 '11 at 13:08
  • Ha! Because that closure which we define on the RHS of link.onclick = has access to the function containing it, which means the i inside there is a reference to the outer i, and not a copied value (as with normal pass by value passing of arguments)! :)) Lovely. I finally understand this :D – Bloke May 14 '14 at 21:52

This is happening because they're all referencing the same i variable, which is changing every loop, and left as 10 at the end of the loop. You can resolve it using a closure like this:

link.onclick = function(j) { return function() { onClickLink(j+''); }; }(i);

You can give it a try here

Or, make this be the link you clicked in that handler, like this:

link.onclick = function(j) { return function() { onClickLink.call(this, j); }; }(i);

You can try that version here

  • 1
    Just to be clear: are you returning the declaration of an anonymous function which accepts a parameter j and at the same moment you are passing the actual parameter too? (the (i)) – dierre Aug 16 '10 at 17:47
  • 3
    @dierre - The (i) invokes the function(j) with the parameter being the current i, triggering it to return the function in which a copied value is in the closure, no longer connected to i, make sense? – Nick Craver Aug 16 '10 at 17:49
  • It seems the same thing I'm saying but I'm not sure: to me function(j) { return function() { onClickLink(j+''); }; } is MyAnonymFunction(j). What I'm seeing is link.onclick = MyAnonymFunction(i); – dierre Aug 16 '10 at 17:53
  • @dierre - Use the back tick (tilde key) for comment code :) I'm not sure how to describe it differently, you're invoking the anonymous function that returns another anonymous function, but with a different variable since it came from a different closure (the outer function). – Nick Craver Aug 16 '10 at 18:01
  • I've just discovered the Ctrl-K shortcut but does not work on comments. BTW I got it. I'm sorry for my english :) – dierre Aug 16 '10 at 18:07
link.onclick = function() { onClickLink(i+''); };

Is a closure and stores a reference to the variable i, not the value that i holds when the function is created. One solution would be to wrap the contents of the for loop in a function do this:

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) (function(i) {
    var link = document.createElement('a');
    link.setAttribute('href', '#');
    link.innerHTML = i + '';
    link.onclick=  function() { onClickLink(i+'');};
    div.appendChild(link);
    div.appendChild(document.createElement('BR'));
}(i));
  • I think you've got some brackets misbalanced there. Should it be })(i); on the last line? – Jamie Wong Aug 16 '10 at 17:42
  • 1
    That works, as does omitting the outer parentheses, but this is the "Crockford-approved" style: stackoverflow.com/questions/939386/… – Ryan Tenney Aug 16 '10 at 17:44
  • Ah - good to know. – Jamie Wong Aug 16 '10 at 17:46

Try this:

<div id="div"></div>

<script language="javascript" type="text/javascript">
   var div = document.getElementById('div');

   for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
       var f = function() {
           var link = document.createElement('a');
           var j = i; // this j is scoped to our anonymous function
                      // while i is scoped outside the anonymous function,
                      //  getting incremented by the for loop
           link.setAttribute('href', '#');
           link.innerHTML = j + '';
           link.onclick=  function() { onClickLink(j+'');};
           div.appendChild(link);
           div.appendChild(document.createElement('br')); // lower case BR, please!
       }(); // call the function immediately
   }

   function onClickLink(text) {
       alert('Link ' + text + ' clicked');
       return false;
   }
</script>

or you could use this line:

 link.setAttribute('onClick', 'onClickLink('+i+')');

instead of this one:

link.onclick=  function() { onClickLink(i+'');};
  • setAttribute for onclicks and styles do not work on <ie8 – srijan Sep 20 '12 at 4:54

Another simple way ( might not be the best practice) but works like charm. Build the HTML tag of your element(hyperLink or Button) dynamically with javascript, and can pass multiple parameters as well.

// variable to hold the HTML Tags 
var ProductButtonsHTML  ="";

//Run your loop
for (var i = 0; i < ProductsJson.length; i++){
// Build the <input> Tag with the required parameters for Onclick call. Use double quotes.

ProductButtonsHTML += " <input type='button' value='" + ProductsJson[i].DisplayName + "'  
onclick = \"BuildCartById('" + ProductsJson[i].SKU+ "'," + ProductsJson[i].Id + ")\"></input> ";

}

// Add the Tags to the Div's innerHTML.
document.getElementById("divProductsMenuStrip").innerHTML = ProductButtonsHTML;

It is probably better to create a dedicated function to create the link so you can avoid creating two anonymous functions. Thus:

<div id="div"></div>

<script>
  function getLink(id)
  {
    var link = document.createElement('a');
    link.setAttribute('href', '#');
    link.innerHTML = id;
    link.onclick = function()
    {
      onClickLink(id);
    };
    link.style.display = 'block';
    return link;
  }
  var div = document.getElementById('div');
  for (var i = 0; i < 10; i += 1)
  {
    div.appendChild(getLink(i.toString()));
  }
</script>

Although in both cases you end up with two functions, I just think it is better to wrap it in a function that is semantically easier to comprehend.

onclick vs addEventListener. A matter of preference perhaps (where IE>9).

// Using closures
function onClickLink(e, index) {   
    alert(index);
    return false;
}

var div = document.getElementById('div');

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    var link = document.createElement('a');

    link.setAttribute('href', '#');
    link.innerHTML = i + '';
    link.addEventListener('click', (function(e) {
        var index = i;
        return function(e) {
            return onClickLink(e, index);
        }
    })(), false);
    div.appendChild(link);
    div.appendChild(document.createElement('BR'));
}

How abut just using a plain data-* attribute, not as cool as a closure, but..

function onClickLink(e) {       
    alert(e.target.getAttribute('data-index'));
    return false;
}

var div = document.getElementById('div');

for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    var link = document.createElement('a');

    link.setAttribute('href', '#');
    link.setAttribute('data-index', i);
    link.innerHTML = i + ' Hello';        
    link.addEventListener('click', onClickLink, false);
    div.appendChild(link);
    div.appendChild(document.createElement('BR'));
}

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