Out of curiosity, I just wanna know what will happen if I use setState() function in constructor of a Class in React Native or ReactJS? Such as:

constructor(props) {
  super(props);
  this.setState({title: 'new title'});
}

what's the lifecycle of React gonna happen?


I haven't read the code inside React. I am afraid it will some any damage when I write it that way.

  • 1
    Try it out: put a console.log() message in each of the lifecycle methods and let us know. – Matthew Herbst Jan 23 '16 at 10:10
  • 2
    Try it and see, thats the only way you'll know ;) – TheLazyChap Jan 23 '16 at 10:10
  • Might even say that this.state is for read-only, while this.setState is for writing updates. – zepner Feb 8 '17 at 14:04
up vote 40 down vote accepted

What setState essentially does is to run a bunch of logic you probably don't need in the constructor.

When you go state = {foo : "bar"} you simply assign something to the javascript object state, like you would any other object. (That's all state is by the way, just a regular object local to every component).

When you use setState(), then apart from assigning to the object state react also rerenders the component and all it's children. Which you don't need in the constructor, since the component hasn't been rendered anyway.

  • 14
    what if I have a promise inside of my constructor which manipulates the state on resolving. Would I set the state within the promise's callback as this.setState? – henk Apr 28 '17 at 12:28
  • then u will have to use setState if you want to render again... But I find the render() function DOES run twice, but state is still default without the new values... – zaxy78 May 29 at 13:35
  • if you need to use promise inside constructor - Don't. Instead, call the promise (for example a fetch call) inside componentDidMount() . – zaxy78 May 29 at 13:58

Error Message would be Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'VARIABLE_NAME' of null

Please see the following two jsfiddle snippets.

Case 1) Working solution jsfiddle

class Hello extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
      super(props);

      this.state = {
        name: 'world'
      } 
    }

  render() {
    return <div>{this.state.name} </div>
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<Hello />, document.getElementById('container'));

Case 2) Not working solution

class Hello extends React.Component {
    constructor(props) {
      super(props);

      this.setState({
        name: 'hello'
      });
    }

  render() {
    return <div>{this.state.name} </div>
  }
}

ReactDOM.render(<Hello />, document.getElementById('container'));

Conclusion:

My rule of thumb, inside constructor uses this.state = {} directly, other places use this.setState({ });

  • I observed this even in React Native. Wondering whats the reason behind it? – vincent mathew Mar 25 '17 at 10:17
  • 1
    The idea is actually quite simple. Since this.state itself is a plain object, changing its value won't notify any listeners by default. Instead, this.setState is a function call, you can actually notify and dispatch events to other listeners. You can see React actually put the callback in a queue and do more optimization in the setState -> ReactBaseClasses – Alan Dong May 4 '17 at 4:04
  • I was wondering why this.setState can't be called in constructor. – vincent mathew May 4 '17 at 17:05
  • Because setState is async. It can result unexpected behavior if you were trying to get or modify this.state in the following life cycles, since this.state is not set yet. – Alan Dong May 4 '17 at 18:25
  • That is the error that you get, but you don't say why you get it. I already know the error (or can at least find it, by running the code myself), I don't need to look up what error I'm getting. I'm looking it up, to understand why, I'm getting this error, and what might the creator's thinking behind this, be. I understand you are answering the question, but for future people, looking for an answer, it'd be much more helpful to explain the why, and not just the what. – Elliot Schep Dec 28 '17 at 14:30

Constructor: Constructor is Used to initialize the state.

State : Components that contain local state have a property called "this.state".

SetState: React components have a method available to them called setState Calling "this.setState" causes React to re-render your application and update the DOM.you can also track of prevstate in setState If you use setState in constructor you would get error like this:Can only update a mounted or mounting component. This usually means you called setState() on an unmounted component.

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