I'm trying to remove all the initial multiline comments from a large directory of source files using unix tools.

For example, I have this file testfile.c

/* 
   testfile.c
   get rid of me
*/

int main(int argc, const char *argv[]) {
/* 
   keep me
*/
    return 0;
}


/* 
   keep me
*/

I've tried using sed like this:

sed '/\/\*/,/\*\//d' testfile.c

but that strips all multiline comments resulting in:

int main(int argc, const char *argv[]) {
    return 0;
}

Is there a way to do this and only remove the multiline comment if it starts at the very first line of the file and to leave all other comments in tact?

  • Are you removing licenses? – tomc Jan 23 '16 at 19:57
  • yes, with a plan to put them back once I'm done – Idr Jan 23 '16 at 19:57
  • ^ is anchor tag for matching pattern occurring at very beginning. So use it like this /^\/\*/,/\*\//d – user2705585 Jan 23 '16 at 20:00
  • 1
    That's an anchor for the start of the line, not the start of the file. That doesn't solve the problem. – Idr Jan 23 '16 at 20:01
  • Check my regex. It matches the first occurrence of the multi line comment. Use g for global search. – user2705585 Jan 23 '16 at 20:07
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This assumes that there's nothing you want from your file before the first multiline comment. It just says to start printing after you see the */ that ends the first comment (and then never to stop again regardless of what's seen).

$ awk '!f&&/\*\//{f=1;next}f' testfile.c 

int main(int argc, const char *argv[]) {
/*
   keep me
*/
    return 0;
}


/*
   keep me
*/

Explanation:

!f && /\*\// { f=1; next }

If the flag f is not set (that is, if f equals 0, which it does when the program begins), and the current line contains the pattern */ (where both characters require escaping with \), then set the flag to 1 and go immediately to the next line (without printing).

f

Print the current line if the flag f is set to 1 (and recall that we only arrive here if the next statement was not executed, thereby avoiding to print the last line of the initial comment).

  • thank you! Can you explain that bit of magic? – Idr Jan 23 '16 at 20:07
  • You're welcome; explanation added --- if anything still not clear let me know. – jas Jan 23 '16 at 20:20
  • 1
    More concisely: awk 'f; /*\//{f=1}' testfile.c. – Ed Morton Jan 24 '16 at 1:52

Wrap your part /\/\*/,/\*\//d with GNU sed in 1,/\*\//{ ... }:

sed '1,/\*\//{ /\/\*/,/\*\//d }' file

Output:


int main(int argc, const char *argv[]) {
/* 
   keep me
*/
    return 0;
}


/* 
   keep me
*/
  • That works as well. Can you explain the 1, part that you added? – Idr Jan 23 '16 at 20:18
  • 1,/\*\//{ ... } limits sed's actions to the range from first line (1) to first line with */ (escaped: \*\/). – Cyrus Jan 23 '16 at 20:21

if your comments all end the same way try something like

awk 'BEGIN {while($1 != "*/") getline}{print}'

otherwise you will have to do something fancier looking at the last two chars of a line till you find the end of the first comment.

This has the feature of not testing any line after it has done its job.

  • This will spin off into an infinite loop if the getline fails, has other issues, and is a completely unnecessary use of getline. See awk.info/?tip/getline` – Ed Morton Jan 24 '16 at 1:47
sed '/\/\*/,/\*\// s/.*//g' filename | awk '!/^$/'
  1. Matching by pattern ranges and replacing all by nothing.
  2. Removing empty lines

Output:

  int main(int argc, const char *argv[]) {
        return 0;
        }
  • this removes all comments which is not the OP wants. – Idr Jan 25 '16 at 16:50
  • yes, I dint read the question properly – Sadhun Jan 27 '16 at 6:52

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