5

I am on Mac OS X and using sed for an in-place replacement.

Essentially I have this:

#!/bin/sh -e
PREFIX="$1"

sed -i bak -e 's|OCAMLDIR|"${PREFIX}"|g' ocamloptrev

Where PREFIX is a path, hence I'm using the |.

Unfortunately, the variable in the file path is not getting evaluated as I expected, I end up with:

OCAMLC="${PREFIX}"/bin/ocamlopt

How can I get the right evaluation of ${PREFIX} into the sed command?

8

Try this:

#!/bin/sh -e
PREFIX="$1"

sed -i bak -e 's|OCAMLDIR|'"${PREFIX}"'|g' ocamloptrev

What you're basically doing, is "exiting"/getting outside the single-quoted string, entering into a double-quoted string, interpreting the variable inside double-quotes, and then entering the single quotes again.

With this simple example, we could also just use double-quotes, which allow variables to be interpreted:

#!/bin/sh -e
PREFIX="$1"

sed -i bak -e "s|OCAMLDIR|${PREFIX}|g" ocamloptrev

If you try to use double-quotes ("") inside single-quotes, they don't get interpreted either. This part of the Bash manual explains this in more detail.

3.1.2.2 Single Quotes

Enclosing characters in single quotes (‘'’) preserves the literal value of each character within the quotes. A single quote may not occur between single quotes, even when preceded by a backslash.

3.1.2.3 Double Quotes

Enclosing characters in double quotes (‘"’) preserves the literal value of all characters within the quotes, with the exception of $, `, \, and, when history expansion is enabled, !. The characters $ and ` retain their special meaning within double quotes (see Shell Expansions). ...

| improve this answer | |
  • The first code would run into problems if ${PREFIX} contained spaces etc. You should enclose that in double quotes: 's|OCAMLDIR|'"${PREFIX}"'|g' to be safe. Otherwise, your answer is fine. – Jonathan Leffler Jan 23 '16 at 22:17
3

Shell variables are not expanded inside single quotes (there are no metacharacters within single quotes, not even backslashes), so you need to use something like this, with the double quotes around ${PREFIX} ensuring that spaces etc in the value are handled correctly:

sed -i bak -e 's|OCAMLDIR|'"${PREFIX}"'|g' ocamloptrev

Or you could even use:

sed -i bak -e "s|OCAMLDIR|${PREFIX}|g" ocamloptrev

The latter is safe because the material inside the double quotes does not contain shell metacharacters (dollar signs, backslashes and back-quotes are the main danger signs). If there were dodgy characters in the rest of the string, the first version is safer to use.

Personally, I'd use .bak rather than just bak as the suffix.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.