6

We are familiar with overloading based on function parameters. But why can't we have overloading based on non-type template parameters? With such overloading, you don't have to add extra function parameters just for overloading purposes, which may have a negative impact on runtime performance. Alas, the following code does not compile:

template <bool>
void func() {}

template <int>
void func() {}

int main() {
  func<0>();
}

The error message produced is

error: call of overloaded 'func()' is ambiguous
       func<0>();
               ^
note: candidate: void func() [with bool <anonymous> = false]
     void func() {}
          ^
note: candidate: void func() [with int <anonymous> = 0]
     void func() {}
          ^

Note that this may be more efficient than

void func(bool) {}

void func(int) {}

Is there any problem in allowing this usage?

11
  • It compiles fine for me in VS 2013. But if I try to actually call one of them, it says it's ambiguous. If I replace int with, say, std::ostream&, then it works just fine. Might be VS-specific, though. Jan 24, 2016 at 5:56
  • Do you have an exact usage scenario (MCVE)? If you don't instantiate the template it generates no code. So, how do you instantiate those? Also, how do you call those overloaded functions (in second snippet)? Jan 24, 2016 at 6:01
  • 1
    @SergeyTachenov The "C" in MCVE is Complete. I am sure an MCVE can be created.
    – R Sahu
    Jan 24, 2016 at 6:05
  • 4
    You can declare them; you can't really use the bool one, because there's no mini-overload-resolution for template arguments; everything that's a valid converted constant expression of the template parameter's type is equally good. Regardless, if you actually see a negative impact from dummy parameters passed to control overload resolution, you should be filing bugs with your compiler vendor, not contorting your code (further).
    – T.C.
    Jan 24, 2016 at 6:06
  • 2
    if calling func(bool) vs func<true>() makes a difference in the performance your application, I would say you are in pretty good shape.
    – R Sahu
    Jan 24, 2016 at 6:09

3 Answers 3

2

If you are open to a bit of added syntax, you can use:

// No default implementation.
template <typename T, T value> struct Impl;

// Implement the bool/true version
template <> struct Impl<bool, true>
{
   void operator()() {}
};

// Implement the bool/false version
template <> struct Impl<bool, false>
{
   void operator()() {}
};

// Implement the int version
template <int N> struct Impl<int, N>
{
   void operator()() {}
};

template <typename T, T value>
void func()
{
   Impl<T, value>()();
};

int main()
{
   func<bool, true>();
   func<int, 10>();
}

Disclaimer

I have no idea whether this will perform better than calling func(true).

2
  • 3
    OMG you are creating an empty object! It "may have a negative impact on runtime performance"!! (+1, btw, though personally I prefer making it a static member function.)
    – T.C.
    Jan 24, 2016 at 6:21
  • @T.C. I feel ashamed. Seems that I've being paying too much attention to trivial things that do not really matter.
    – Lingxi
    Jan 24, 2016 at 6:48
1

Andrei Alexandrescu wrote about this in "Modern C++ Design", IIUC, and it looks like std::integral_constant can basically give nearly the effect you want, no? What would be the major improvements over the following? It basically allows to overload on (at least integral types of) constants.

#include <type_traits>


using tt = std::integral_constant<bool, true>;
constexpr tt t;
using ft = std::integral_constant<bool, false>;
constexpr ft f;


void func(tt) {};

void func(ft) {};


int main()
{
    func(t);
    return 0;
}
3
  • In my example, both overloads accept func<0>() except that one is a better match than the other. In your case, this does not hold. And this does make a difference in my use-case.
    – Lingxi
    Jan 24, 2016 at 6:17
  • @Lingxi It's a better match in your mind, perhaps. Not in the standard's.
    – T.C.
    Jan 24, 2016 at 6:18
  • @Lingxi I was wondering about that. IIUC, there's a slight discrepancy between the title and body of your question. I answered the title. I believe T.C.'s comment addresses the body.
    – Ami Tavory
    Jan 24, 2016 at 6:19
-5

Why would you want to do that?

Templates are meant and designed for cases when the behavior of function is similar when having different types (such as finding a maximum value, as long as the operator '>' is supported for that type, you can find the maximum value. Doesn't matter whether it's an int or a float and such).

You should just overload it and not worry about the impact, it is not as bad as you might think. If the behavior is different enough between the functions, you shouldn't bother using templates

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