1

I have some exceptions derived from std::exception or std::runtime_error. The only method is constructor explicit MyExceptionX(const char *text = "") : std::exception(text) {}. Are there ways to make this code simpler without use of macro?

class MyException1: public std::exception
{
public:
    explicit MyException1(const char *text = "") : std::exception(text) {}
};

class MyException2: public std::exception
{
public:
    explicit MyException2(const char *text = "") : std::exception(text) {}
};

class MyException3: public std::exception
{
public:
    explicit MyException3(const char *text = "") : std::exception(text) {}
};

//...
  • 2
    Is your code supposed to compile? – juanchopanza Jan 24 '16 at 22:31
  • I think this is a valid case to use macro. – Bryan Chen Jan 24 '16 at 22:33
  • What I meant was, please post some code that at least compiles. – juanchopanza Jan 24 '16 at 22:37
7

There's no need to use class when everything is public. You can use struct instead. Also, you can inherit constructors:

struct MyException1: std::exception
{
    using std::exception::exception;
};

struct MyException2: std::exception
{
    using std::exception::exception;
};

struct MyException3: std::exception
{
    using std::exception::exception;
};

Also, if you really just need different types, you can do this:

template <int>
struct MyException : std::exception
{
    using std::exception::exception;
};


using MyException1 = MyException<1>;
using MyException2 = MyException<2>;
using MyException3 = MyException<3>;

You can use an enum instead of an int if you want more descriptive names.

  • I like your suggestion but I usually use it with an enum like so: enum class my_problems { no_money, no_love, no_sleep }; template <my_problems> struct my_exception : std::exception {}; Then you can say things like my_exception<my_problems::no_sleep> which I find very expressive. You might not need the using alias at all any more. – 5gon12eder Jan 24 '16 at 22:47
  • @5gon12eder: Agreed. I started to do it that way, but it ended up looking silly for this example: enum class ExceptionId {one,two,three}. – Vaughn Cato Jan 24 '16 at 22:48
  • I see what you mean. That's the problem with contrived examples. – 5gon12eder Jan 24 '16 at 22:50
  • 1
    @Ufx: Yes, see stackoverflow.com/a/434784/951890 – Vaughn Cato Jan 24 '16 at 23:09
  • 1
    @Ufx: see also stackoverflow.com/a/9979249/951890 – Vaughn Cato Jan 24 '16 at 23:10
0

You can be using the superclass' constructor. The following simplified code example does what you are looking for:

#include <iostream>

class A {
public:
  A(char* cText) {
    std::cout << cText << std::endl;
  }

  ~A() {
  }
};

class B : public A {
public:
  using A::A;

  ~B() {
  }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  B("Test");

  return 0;
}

Additionally, the using feature for inheriting constructors is only available when compiling with -std=c++11 or -std=gnu++11.

  • you need to mark ~A() a virtual destructor – Bryan Chen Jan 24 '16 at 22:40
  • A better solution would be to not use new and delete at all. – juanchopanza Jan 24 '16 at 22:43
  • @BryanChen no, you don't. It works like a charm without making ~A() virtual. Making it virtual actually chages what the effect of the polymorphism is w.r.t. what gets executed when deconstructing the class. Additionally, polymorphism of the destructor is not subject to OP's question. – user1357959 Jan 24 '16 at 22:43
  • @juanchopanza Acknowledged, I'll change that. Thanks. – user1357959 Jan 24 '16 at 22:45
0

The following compiles fine in my VisualStudio 2012:

template <const char *&text>
class MyException: public std::exception
{
public:
    virtual const char* what() const { return(text); }
};

const char *Ex1 = "Message1";
const char *Ex2 = "Message2";
const char *Ex3 = "Message3";

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    throw MyException<Ex1>();
    throw MyException<Ex2>();
    throw MyException<Ex3>();
    return 0;
}

Unfortunately C++ does not allow using string literals in the throw statement itself. Details can be found here: String literals not allowed as non type template parameters.

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