85

I am trying to iterate over all the elements of a static array of strings in the best possible way. I want to be able to declare it on one line and easily add/remove elements from it without having to keep track of the number. Sounds really simple, doesn't it?

Possible non-solutions:

vector<string> v;
v.push_back("abc");
b.push_back("xyz");

for(int i = 0; i < v.size(); i++)
    cout << v[i] << endl;

Problems - no way to create the vector on one line with a list of strings

Possible non-solution 2:

string list[] = {"abc", "xyz"};

Problems - no way to get the number of strings automatically (that I know of).

There must be an easy way of doing this.

15 Answers 15

26

The boost assign library seems to be exactly what you are looking for. It makes assigning constants to containers easier than ever.

  • 30
    That is just straight up fugly. – g33kz0r Jun 12 '10 at 18:25
106

C++ 11 added initialization lists to allow the following syntax:

std::vector<std::string> v = {"Hello", "World"};

Support for this C++ 11 feature was added in at least GCC 4.4 and only in Visual Studio 2013.

  • 3
    I know it's years old - but I really think this is the best answer now. – user778005 Sep 7 '13 at 18:36
  • 3
    I agree, and it's years older. – Dan Sep 21 '15 at 19:00
  • 2018. Just starting C++ and did quite some research regarding flexible arrays. Ended up just using vectors... – Robert Molina Nov 16 '18 at 3:25
36

You can concisely initialize a vector<string> from a statically-created char* array:

char* strarray[] = {"hey", "sup", "dogg"};
vector<string> strvector(strarray, strarray + 3);

This copies all the strings, by the way, so you use twice the memory. You can use Will Dean's suggestion to replace the magic number 3 here with arraysize(str_array) -- although I remember there being some special case in which that particular version of arraysize might do Something Bad (sorry I can't remember the details immediately). But it very often works correctly.

Also, if you're really gung-ho about the one line thingy, you can define a variadic macro so that a single line such as DEFINE_STR_VEC(strvector, "hi", "there", "everyone"); works.

  • Since strarray is in a header, won't it violate the one definition rule? – jww Feb 21 '17 at 4:41
23

Problems - no way to get the number of strings automatically (that i know of).

There is a bog-standard way of doing this, which lots of people (including MS) define macros like arraysize for:

#define arraysize(ar)  (sizeof(ar) / sizeof(ar[0]))
  • 1
    Alternatively, one could use something like this: template<typename T, size_t N> inline size_t arraysize(T (&ar)[N]) { return N; } (Inline keyword not necessary, but used to document the function's intent. A modern compiler should theoretically be able to return the entire function, I believe. – Justin Time Mar 7 '16 at 21:12
  • This fails for pointers. Counting array elements should be done a different way in C++. – jww Feb 21 '17 at 4:40
9

Declare an array of strings in C++ like this : char array_of_strings[][]

For example : char array_of_strings[200][8192];

will hold 200 strings, each string having the size 8kb or 8192 bytes.

use strcpy(line[i],tempBuffer); to put data in the array of strings.

  • FYI, char array_of_strings[][] can't accept C++ strings, be sure to convert to char* first. cplusplus.com/reference/string/string/c_str – Luqmaan Sep 5 '12 at 16:33
  • Since array_of_strings is in a header, won't it violate the one definition rule? – jww Feb 21 '17 at 4:44
7

One possiblity is to use a NULL pointer as a flag value:

const char *list[] = {"dog", "cat", NULL};
for (char **iList = list; *iList != NULL; ++iList)
{
    cout << *iList;
}
  • What does char ** actually mean? In java, would it be a list of strings? – Doomsknight Oct 11 '12 at 14:05
  • 1
    @Doomsknight: In this case, yes. In the first line I define an array of char*. In memory, this gets laid out as 3 pointers - one points to "dog", one points to "cat" and one is left NULL. I can take a pointer to that first pointer, and get a char** - a pointer to pointer to char. When I increment that, I move the char** to point to the next item in the list - a pointer to the pointer that points to "cat", then I increment again, and get a pointer that points to the NULL pointer, and I know I'm done. ( – Eclipse Oct 11 '12 at 14:54
4

You can use the begin and end functions from the Boost range library to easily find the ends of a primitive array, and unlike the macro solution, this will give a compile error instead of broken behaviour if you accidentally apply it to a pointer.

const char* array[] = { "cat", "dog", "horse" };
vector<string> vec(begin(array), end(array));
3

You can use Will Dean's suggestion [#define arraysize(ar) (sizeof(ar) / sizeof(ar[0]))] to replace the magic number 3 here with arraysize(str_array) -- although I remember there being some special case in which that particular version of arraysize might do Something Bad (sorry I can't remember the details immediately). But it very often works correctly.

The case where it doesn't work is when the "array" is really just a pointer, not an actual array. Also, because of the way arrays are passed to functions (converted to a pointer to the first element), it doesn't work across function calls even if the signature looks like an array — some_function(string parameter[]) is really some_function(string *parameter).

3

Tried to upvote Craig H's answer that you should use boost::assign, but I have no rep :(

I encountered a similar technique in the first article I ever read by Andrei Alexandrescu in C/C++ Users Journal, Vol 16, No 9, September 1998, pp. 73-74 (have the full citation because it's in the comments of my implementation of his code I've been using ever since).

Templates are your friend.

3

Here's an example:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>

int main() {
    const char* const list[] = {"zip", "zam", "bam"};
    const size_t len = sizeof(list) / sizeof(list[0]);

    for (size_t i = 0; i < len; ++i)
        std::cout << list[i] << "\n";

    const std::vector<string> v(list, list + len);
    std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<string>(std::cout, "\n"));
}
2

Instead of that macro, might I suggest this one:

template<typename T, int N>
inline size_t array_size(T(&)[N])
{
    return N;
}

#define ARRAY_SIZE(X)   (sizeof(array_size(X)) ? (sizeof(X) / sizeof((X)[0])) : -1)

1) We want to use a macro to make it a compile-time constant; the function call's result is not a compile-time constant.

2) However, we don't want to use a macro because the macro could be accidentally used on a pointer. The function can only be used on compile-time arrays.

So, we use the defined-ness of the function to make the macro "safe"; if the function exists (i.e. it has non-zero size) then we use the macro as above. If the function does not exist we return a bad value.

2
#include <boost/foreach.hpp>

const char* list[] = {"abc", "xyz"};
BOOST_FOREACH(const char* str, list)
{
    cout << str << endl;
}
1
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/assign/list_of.hpp>

int main()
{
    const std::vector< std::string > v = boost::assign::list_of( "abc" )( "xyz" );
    std::copy(
        v.begin(),
        v.end(),
        std::ostream_iterator< std::string >( std::cout, "\n" ) );
}
1
#include <iostream.h>
#include <iomanip.h>

int main()
{
int n;
cout<<"enter the maximum number\n";
cin>>n;
cout<<"enter the first number\n";
for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
{

for(int j=0;j<n;j++)
{
cin>>a[i][j];
}
}
cout<<"enter the second number\n";
for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
{
for(int k=0;k<n;k++)
{
cin>>b[i][k];
}
}
cout<<"the product will be\n";
for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
{
for(int g=0;g<n;g++)
{
c[i][g]=c[i][c]*c[i][j];
cout<<setw(5)<<c[i][g];
}
cout<<endl;
}
return 0;
}
  • add description in your answer – Mayur Birari Nov 25 '12 at 6:58
  • it not only lacks description but also does not compile under gcc – Jagte Jun 2 '14 at 1:58
1

You can directly declare an array of strings like string s[100];. Then if you want to access specific elements, you can get it directly like s[2][90]. For iteration purposes, take the size of string using the s[i].size() function.

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