3

I have a working Laravel 5.2 project using sub-domain routing that I run locally (homestead) and in production (forge configured with wildcard subdomain routing on AWS). My local project has a host file entry for admin.project.app and successfully routes to admin.project.app while my production version routes to admin.project.com.

My local .env file has the variable APP_ENV=local while my .env on forge has the variable APP_ENV=production. So far, so good.

The problem I am having is that I would expect Laravel to resolve the domain based on the fact that I am running locally (with the extension of .app) or in production (with the extension of .com) using this type of wildcard routing rule:

Route::group(['domain' => 'admin.project.*'], function()
{
    Route::get('/', 'HomeController@index');

});

The problem I am having is that either Laravel, Ngnix, AWS, or Forge is requiring me to explicitly route like this, which seems completely redundant:

if (App::environment('local')) {
    Route::group(['domain' => 'admin.project.app'], function()
    {
        Route::get('/', 'HomeController@index');

    });
}else{
    Route::group(['domain' => 'admin.project.com'], function()
    {
        Route::get('/', 'HomeController@index');

    });

}

Or maybe my expectations are just wrong ;) Any pointers as to what I may be doing wrong are greatly appreciated!

5

The really easy solution would be to use a ternary operator to determine the TLD and use that in the group's domain attribute:

Route::group(['domain' => 'admin.project.' . ((env('APP_ENV') == 'production') ? 'com' : 'app')], function()
{
    Route::get('/', 'HomeController@index');
});

Avoiding duplication of code and adding additional environment variables.

  • I like this, and tried it, but apparently Laravel doesn't like assembling the domain attribute on the fly like this. I can't believe I have to hack something together in Laravel to account for TLD. Yuk. – Gunnar Jan 29 '16 at 8:00
  • @Gunnar This approach works, I've used it myself in the past, but there was a small problem with the code in the answer. I've updated it to wrap the TLD expression in parentheses, otherwise the string concatenation doesn't work properly, because arithmetic operators such as . have precedence over ternary operators ? and :, so when evaluated it tried to concatenate the string with the result of the condition which is true or false, not the result of the expression which is com or app. – Bogdan Jan 29 '16 at 12:55
  • This worked -- thank you! – Gunnar Jan 30 '16 at 5:25
2

Does the same thing happen with a route param {} instead of *? I am not sure that laravel routing supports *:

Route::group(['domain' => 'admin.project.{tld}'], function()
{
    Route::get('/', 'HomeController@index');
});

https://laravel.com/docs/5.2/routing#route-group-sub-domain-routing

Or what if you just used the domain as an ENV variable? In your env file locally, add:

APP_DOMAIN=admin.project.app

Then in the route file:

Route::group(['domain' => env("APP_DOMAIN","admin.project.com")],function(){

});
  • 2
    The second solution is a good one. The first however will most certainly create confusion when routes have their own parameters. Because if you have a route definition like this Route::get('user/{name}', 'UsersController@show');, the action method will receive two parameters show($tld, $name), so all route actions having parameters of their own will end up needing to add the extra $tld parameter. – Bogdan Jan 25 '16 at 19:11

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