12

I have a log-normal distributed set of samples. I can visualize the samples using a histrogram with either linear or logarithmic x-axis. I can perform a fit to the histogram to get the PDF and then scale it to the histrogram in the plot with the linear x-axis, see also this previously posted question.

I am, however, not able to properly plot the PDF into the plot with the logarithmic x-axis.

Unfortunately, it is not only a problem with the scaling of the area of the PDF to the histogram but the PDF is also shifted to the left, as you can see from the following plot.

Histogram and fitted and scaled PDF with a linear x-axis (left) and a logarithmic x-axis (right)

My question now is, what am I doing wrong here? Using the CDF to plot the expected histogram, as suggested in this answer, works. I would just like to know what I am doing wrong in this code as in my understanding it should work too.

This is the python code (I am sorry that it is rather long but I wanted to post a "full stand-alone version"):

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import scipy.stats

# generate log-normal distributed set of samples
np.random.seed(42)
samples   = np.random.lognormal( mean=1, sigma=.4, size=10000 )

# make a fit to the samples
shape, loc, scale = scipy.stats.lognorm.fit( samples, floc=0 )
x_fit       = np.linspace( samples.min(), samples.max(), 100 )
samples_fit = scipy.stats.lognorm.pdf( x_fit, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale )

# plot a histrogram with linear x-axis
plt.subplot( 1, 2, 1 )
N_bins = 50
counts, bin_edges, ignored = plt.hist( samples, N_bins, histtype='stepfilled', label='histogram' )
# calculate area of histogram (area under PDF should be 1)
area_hist = .0
for ii in range( counts.size):
    area_hist += (bin_edges[ii+1]-bin_edges[ii]) * counts[ii]
# oplot fit into histogram
plt.plot( x_fit, samples_fit*area_hist, label='fitted and area-scaled PDF', linewidth=2)
plt.legend()

# make a histrogram with a log10 x-axis
plt.subplot( 1, 2, 2 )
# equally sized bins (in log10-scale)
bins_log10 = np.logspace( np.log10( samples.min()  ), np.log10( samples.max() ), N_bins )
counts, bin_edges, ignored = plt.hist( samples, bins_log10, histtype='stepfilled', label='histogram' )
# calculate area of histogram
area_hist_log = .0
for ii in range( counts.size):
    area_hist_log += (bin_edges[ii+1]-bin_edges[ii]) * counts[ii]
# get pdf-values for log10 - spaced intervals
x_fit_log       = np.logspace( np.log10( samples.min()), np.log10( samples.max()), 100 )
samples_fit_log = scipy.stats.lognorm.pdf( x_fit_log, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale )
# oplot fit into histogram
plt.plot( x_fit_log, samples_fit_log*area_hist_log, label='fitted and area-scaled PDF', linewidth=2 )

plt.xscale( 'log' )
plt.xlim( bin_edges.min(), bin_edges.max() )
plt.legend()
plt.show()

Update 1:

I forgot to mention the versions I am using:

python      2.7.6
numpy       1.8.2
matplotlib  1.3.1
scipy       0.13.3

Update 2:

As pointed out by @Christoph and @zaxliu (thanks to both), the problem lies in the scaling of the PDF. It works when I am using the same bins as for the histogram, as in @zaxliu's solution, but I still have some problems when using a higher resolution for the PDF (as in my example above). This is shown in the following figure:

Histogram and fitted and scaled PDF with a linear x-axis (left) and a logarithmic x-axis (right)

The code for the figure on the right hand side is (I left out the import and data-sample generation stuff, which you can find both in the above example):

# equally sized bins in log10-scale
bins_log10 = np.logspace( np.log10( samples.min()  ), np.log10( samples.max() ), N_bins )
counts, bin_edges, ignored = plt.hist( samples, bins_log10, histtype='stepfilled', label='histogram' )

# calculate length of each bin (required for scaling PDF to histogram)
bins_log_len = np.zeros( bins_log10.size )
for ii in range( counts.size):
    bins_log_len[ii] = bin_edges[ii+1]-bin_edges[ii]

# get pdf-values for same intervals as histogram
samples_fit_log = scipy.stats.lognorm.pdf( bins_log10, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale )

# oplot fitted and scaled PDF into histogram
plt.plot( bins_log10, np.multiply(samples_fit_log,bins_log_len)*sum(counts), label='PDF using histogram bins', linewidth=2 )

# make another pdf with a finer resolution
x_fit_log       = np.logspace( np.log10( samples.min()), np.log10( samples.max()), 100 )
samples_fit_log = scipy.stats.lognorm.pdf( x_fit_log, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale )
# calculate length of each bin (required for scaling PDF to histogram)
# in addition, estimate middle point for more accuracy (should in principle also be done for the other PDF)
bins_log_len       = np.diff( x_fit_log )
samples_log_center = np.zeros( x_fit_log.size-1 )
for ii in range( x_fit_log.size-1 ):
    samples_log_center[ii] = .5*(samples_fit_log[ii] + samples_fit_log[ii+1] )

# scale PDF to histogram
# NOTE: THIS IS NOT WORKING PROPERLY (SEE FIGURE)
pdf_scaled2hist = np.multiply(samples_log_center,bins_log_len)*sum(counts)

# oplot fit into histogram
plt.plot( .5*(x_fit_log[:-1]+x_fit_log[1:]), pdf_scaled2hist, label='PDF using own bins', linewidth=2 )

plt.xscale( 'log' )
plt.xlim( bin_edges.min(), bin_edges.max() )
plt.legend(loc=3)
3
  • 1
    Why not use the CDF to create the expected histogram as I suggested in my answer to your other question (stackoverflow.com/questions/34893615/…)? – Warren Weckesser Jan 26 '16 at 2:14
  • 2
    I should have probably added that when I do it as you suggested, using the CDF to plot the expected histogram, it works. I would just like to know what I am doing wrong in the above example as in my understanding it should work, too... – Alf Jan 26 '16 at 5:47
  • 3
    I might be wrong here but it appears you are using the usual PDF while creating a histogram with variable-sized bins (so that they have equal width in a logarithmic diagram). There is no reason to assume that the PDF and the histogram should look the same, right? – Christoph Jan 26 '16 at 15:01
6

From what I understood in the original answer of @Warren Weckesser that you reffered to "all you need to do" is:

write an approximation of cdf(b) - cdf(a) as cdf(b) - cdf(a) = pdf(m)*(b - a) where m is, say, the midpoint of the interval [a, b]

We can try to to follow his recommendation and plot two ways of getting pdf-values based on central points of bins:

  1. with PDF function
  2. with CDF function:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from scipy import stats 

# generate log-normal distributed set of samples
np.random.seed(42)
samples = np.random.lognormal(mean=1, sigma=.4, size=10000)
N_bins = 50

# make a fit to the samples
shape, loc, scale = stats.lognorm.fit(samples, floc=0)
x_fit       = np.linspace(samples.min(), samples.max(), 100)
samples_fit = stats.lognorm.pdf(x_fit, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale)

# plot a histrogram with linear x-axis
fig, (ax1, ax2) = plt.subplots(1,2, figsize=(10,5), gridspec_kw={'wspace':0.2})
counts, bin_edges, ignored = ax1.hist(samples, N_bins, histtype='stepfilled', alpha=0.4,
                                      label='histogram')

# calculate area of histogram (area under PDF should be 1)
area_hist = ((bin_edges[1:] - bin_edges[:-1]) * counts).sum()

# plot fit into histogram
ax1.plot(x_fit, samples_fit*area_hist, label='fitted and area-scaled PDF', linewidth=2)
ax1.legend()

# equally sized bins in log10-scale and centers
bins_log10 = np.logspace(np.log10(samples.min()), np.log10(samples.max()), N_bins)
bins_log10_cntr = (bins_log10[1:] + bins_log10[:-1]) / 2

# histogram plot
counts, bin_edges, ignored = ax2.hist(samples, bins_log10, histtype='stepfilled', alpha=0.4,
                                      label='histogram')

# calculate length of each bin and its centers(required for scaling PDF to histogram)
bins_log_len = np.r_[bin_edges[1:] - bin_edges[: -1], 0]
bins_log_cntr = bin_edges[1:] - bin_edges[:-1]

# get pdf-values for same intervals as histogram
samples_fit_log = stats.lognorm.pdf(bins_log10, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale)

# pdf-values for centered scale
samples_fit_log_cntr = stats.lognorm.pdf(bins_log10_cntr, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale)

# pdf-values using cdf 
samples_fit_log_cntr2_ = stats.lognorm.cdf(bins_log10, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale)
samples_fit_log_cntr2 = np.diff(samples_fit_log_cntr2_)

# plot fitted and scaled PDFs into histogram
ax2.plot(bins_log10, 
         samples_fit_log * bins_log_len * counts.sum(), '-', 
         label='PDF with edges',  linewidth=2)

ax2.plot(bins_log10_cntr, 
         samples_fit_log_cntr * bins_log_cntr * counts.sum(), '-', 
         label='PDF with centers', linewidth=2)

ax2.plot(bins_log10_cntr, 
         samples_fit_log_cntr2 * counts.sum(), 'b-.', 
         label='CDF with centers', linewidth=2)


ax2.set_xscale('log')
ax2.set_xlim(bin_edges.min(), bin_edges.max())
ax2.legend(loc=3)
plt.show()

enter image description here

You can see that both first (using pdf) and second (using cdf) methods give almost the same results and both do not exactly match pdf calculated with edges of bins.

If you zoom in you would see the difference clearly:

enter image description here

Now the question one can ask is: which one to use? I guess the answer will depend but if we look at cumulative probabilities:

print 'Cumulative probabilities:'
print 'Using edges:         {:>10.5f}'.format((samples_fit_log * bins_log_len).sum())
print 'Using PDF of centers:{:>10.5f}'.format((samples_fit_log_cntr * bins_log_cntr).sum())
print 'Using CDF of centers:{:>10.5f}'.format(samples_fit_log_cntr2.sum())

You can see which method is closer to 1.0 from output:

Cumulative probabilities:
Using edges:            1.03263
Using PDF of centers:   0.99957
Using CDF of centers:   0.99991

CDF seems to give the closest approximation.

It was long one, but I hope this makes sense.

Update:

I have adjusted the code to illustrate how you can smoothen the PDF line. Note s variable which is defining how smooth the line will be. I added _s suffix to variables to indicate where the adjustements need to happen.

# generate log-normal distributed set of samples
np.random.seed(42)
samples = np.random.lognormal(mean=1, sigma=.4, size=10000)
N_bins = 50

# make a fit to the samples
shape, loc, scale = stats.lognorm.fit(samples, floc=0)

# plot a histrogram with linear x-axis
fig, ax2 = plt.subplots()#1,2, figsize=(10,5), gridspec_kw={'wspace':0.2})

# equally sized bins in log10-scale and centers
bins_log10 = np.logspace(np.log10(samples.min()), np.log10(samples.max()), N_bins)
bins_log10_cntr = (bins_log10[1:] + bins_log10[:-1]) / 2

# smoother PDF line
s = 10 # mulpiplier to N_bins - the bigger s is the smoother the line
bins_log10_s = np.logspace(np.log10(samples.min()), np.log10(samples.max()), N_bins * s)
bins_log10_cntr_s = (bins_log10_s[1:] + bins_log10_s[:-1]) / 2

# histogram plot
counts, bin_edges, ignored = ax2.hist(samples, bins_log10, histtype='stepfilled', alpha=0.4,
                                      label='histogram')

# calculate length of each bin and its centers(required for scaling PDF to histogram)
bins_log_len = np.r_[bins_log10_s[1:] - bins_log10_s[: -1], 0]
bins_log_cntr = bins_log10_s[1:] - bins_log10_s[:-1]

# smooth pdf-values for same intervals as histogram
samples_fit_log_s = stats.lognorm.pdf(bins_log10_s, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale)

# pdf-values for centered scale
samples_fit_log_cntr = stats.lognorm.pdf(bins_log10_cntr_s, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale)

# smooth pdf-values using cdf 
samples_fit_log_cntr2_s_ = stats.lognorm.cdf(bins_log10_s, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale)
samples_fit_log_cntr2_s = np.diff(samples_fit_log_cntr2_s_)

# plot fitted and scaled PDFs into histogram
ax2.plot(bins_log10_cntr_s, 
         samples_fit_log_cntr * bins_log_cntr * counts.sum() * s, '-', 
         label='Smooth PDF with centers', linewidth=2)

ax2.plot(bins_log10_cntr_s, 
         samples_fit_log_cntr2_s * counts.sum() * s, 'k-.', 
         label='Smooth CDF with centers', linewidth=2)

ax2.set_xscale('log')
ax2.set_xlim(bin_edges.min(), bin_edges.max())
ax2.legend(loc=3)
plt.show)

This produces this plot:

enter image description here

If you zoom in on the smoothed version vs. non-smoothed you will see this:

enter image description here

Hope this helps.

5
  • thanks a lot for that thorough analysis! I played around with your ways of scaling but, still, when I want to have a higher resolution for my PDF (if I want to have it smoother) than for the histogram, i.e. samples_fit_log.size to be larger than bins_log10.size, I am not able to properly scale the PDF... – Alf Jan 29 '16 at 9:36
  • 1
    I have added code to produce smooth lines for both PDF-based and CDF-based approaches. – Primer Jan 29 '16 at 11:11
  • thanks again for your effort, but I think you made a "mistake" there, well not really a mistake, but there is no need to make another histogram (bin_edges_s is the same as bins_log10_s). Also, I still don't understand why you have to multiply the PDF with the factor s in your example, or x_fit_log.size/N_bins as in my example (as written in a comment to @zaxliu's reply), since you are using the newly created bins and PDF-samples and count.sum() should, of course, not change. – Alf Jan 29 '16 at 17:25
  • Thanks for spotting the "mistake" - corrected. Regarding s: If don't need your pdf line to match (or outline) your histogram then you don't need to worry about s - just remove it. But if you want pdf line to fit histogram (i.e. probabilities of each of N_bins drawn from sample.size) to appear approximately close to your pdf line (i.e. probabilities of N_bins * s drawn from the same sample.size) you clearly need to scale pdf probabilities (i.e. * s). Since probability (for an element in sample) to appear in N_bins will always be higher than to appear in N_bins * s. – Primer Feb 1 '16 at 8:38
  • hmm, my naive (?) assumption is that sum(counts) does not change if I change the resolution of the histogram (that is bins_log10 in my example), likewise should the area under the PDF be independent of the size of the bins (x_fit_log in my example). Therefore, I should just have to re-scale the (finer-resolution) PDF to the histogram by multiplying the area of the PDF (which should be 1, right?) with the area of the histogram. Somehow this does not seem to be the case in my example... – Alf Feb 16 '16 at 10:47
5

Since I faced the same problem and figured it out, I wanted to explain what is going and provide a different solution for the original question.

When you do a histogram with logarithmic bins, this is equivalent to making a change of variables enter image description here, where x are your original samples (or the grid you use to plot them) and t is a new variable with respect to which the bins are linearly spaced. Therefore, the PDF that actually corresponds to the histogram is

enter image description here

We are still working with x variables as inputs to the PDF though, so this becomes

enter image description here

You need to multiply your PDF by x!

That fixes the shape of the PDF, but we still have to scale the PDF so that the area under the curve is equal to the histogram. In fact the area under the PDF is not equal to one, because we are integrating over x, and

enter image description here

since we are dealing with a lognormal variable. Since, according to the scipy documentation, the distribution parameters correspond to shape = sigma and scale = exp(mu), we can easily compute the right hand side in your code as scale * np.exp(shape**2/2.).

In fact, a single line of code fixes your original script, multiplying the computed PDF values by x and dividing by the area calculated above:

samples_fit_log *= x_fit_log / (scale * np.exp(shape**2/2.))

Resulting in the following plot:

enter image description here

Alternatively, you can change your definition of histogram "area" by integrating the histogram in log space. Remember, in log space (t variable) the PDF has area 1. So you can skip the scaling factor, and replace the line above by:

area_hist_log = np.dot(np.diff(np.log(bin_edges)), counts)
samples_fit_log *= x_fit_log

This latter solution may be preferable because it does not depend on any information about the distribution at hand. It applies to any distribution, not just log-normal.

For reference, here is the original script with my line added:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import scipy.stats

# generate log-normal distributed set of samples
np.random.seed(42)
samples   = np.random.lognormal( mean=1, sigma=.4, size=10000 )

# make a fit to the samples
shape, loc, scale = scipy.stats.lognorm.fit( samples, floc=0 )
x_fit       = np.linspace( samples.min(), samples.max(), 100 )
samples_fit = scipy.stats.lognorm.pdf( x_fit, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale )

# plot a histrogram with linear x-axis
plt.subplot( 1, 2, 1 )
N_bins = 50
counts, bin_edges, ignored = plt.hist( samples, N_bins, histtype='stepfilled', label='histogram' )
# calculate area of histogram (area under PDF should be 1)
area_hist = .0
for ii in range( counts.size):
    area_hist += (bin_edges[ii+1]-bin_edges[ii]) * counts[ii]
# oplot fit into histogram
plt.plot( x_fit, samples_fit*area_hist, label='fitted and area-scaled PDF', linewidth=2)
plt.legend()

# make a histrogram with a log10 x-axis
plt.subplot( 1, 2, 2 )
# equally sized bins (in log10-scale)
bins_log10 = np.logspace( np.log10( samples.min()  ), np.log10( samples.max() ), N_bins )
counts, bin_edges, ignored = plt.hist( samples, bins_log10, histtype='stepfilled', label='histogram' )
# calculate area of histogram
area_hist_log = .0
for ii in range( counts.size):
    area_hist_log += (bin_edges[ii+1]-bin_edges[ii]) * counts[ii]
# get pdf-values for log10 - spaced intervals
x_fit_log       = np.logspace( np.log10( samples.min()), np.log10( samples.max()), 100 )
samples_fit_log = scipy.stats.lognorm.pdf( x_fit_log, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale )
# scale pdf output:
samples_fit_log *= x_fit_log / (scale * np.exp(shape**2/2.))
# alternatively you could do:
#area_hist_log = np.dot(np.diff(np.log(bin_edges)), counts)
#samples_fit_log *= x_fit_log

# oplot fit into histogram
plt.plot( x_fit_log, samples_fit_log*area_hist_log, label='fitted and area-scaled PDF', linewidth=2 )

plt.xscale( 'log' )
plt.xlim( bin_edges.min(), bin_edges.max() )
plt.legend()
plt.show()
1

As pointed out by @Christoph, the problem lies in the way you scale sampled pdf.

Because pdf is the density of probability density, if you want the expected frequency in a bin, you should first multiple the density by the bin length to get the approximate probability that a sample will fall in this bin, then you can multiply this probability by the total number of samples to estimate the number of samples that will fall in this bin.

In other words, each bin should be scaled ununiformly in log-scale, whereas you scale them uniformly with the "area under hist". As a fix, you can do the following:

# make a histrogram with a log10 x-axis
plt.subplot( 1, 2, 2 )
# equally sized bins (in log10-scale)
bins_log10 = np.logspace( np.log10( samples.min()  ), np.log10( samples.max() ), N_bins )
counts, bin_edges, ignored = plt.hist( samples, bins_log10, histtype='stepfilled', label='histogram' )
# calculate length of each bin
len_bin_log = np.zeros([bins_log10.size,])
for ii in range( counts.size):
    len_bin_log[ii] = (bin_edges[ii+1]-bin_edges[ii])

# get pdf-values for log10 - spaced intervals
# x_fit_log       = np.logspace( np.log10( samples.min()), np.log10( samples.max()), N_bins )
samples_fit_log = scipy.stats.lognorm.pdf( bins_log10, shape, loc=loc, scale=scale )

# oplot fit into histogram
plt.plot(bins_log10 , np.multiply(samples_fit_log,len_bin_log)*sum(counts), label='fitted and area-scaled PDF', linewidth=2 )
plt.xscale( 'log' )
plt.xlim( bin_edges.min(), bin_edges.max() )
# plt.legend()
plt.show()

Also you may also want to consider modify the scaling method in linear scale in a similar fashion. Actually, you don't need to accumulate the area, just multiple density by bin size then by total number of samples.

Update

It came up to me that my current approach for estimating probability in bins may not be the most accurate one. Estimating with a sample on the middle point may be be more accurate since pdf curves are concave.

3
  • thanks to both @Christoph and @zaxliu. The solution suggested by @zaxliu works well, but when I want to have a higher resolution for the PDF than for the histogram (like in my original example), it is no longer scaling correctly: I am using x_fit_log with size of 100 (larger than N_bins) for the PDF, calculating the length of each of these bins, multiplying it with the PDF-values (using the middle point) and then with sum(counts). When plotting in into the histogram plot, the scaled PDF-values are too small by a factor of x_fit_log.size/N_bins for some reason... – Alf Jan 27 '16 at 11:11
  • @Alf can you provide some code on how you calculated bin length and middel point pdf sample? – zaxliu Jan 27 '16 at 15:06
  • I updated the question to show both your example (working) and my example (not working) – Alf Jan 28 '16 at 7:03

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