60

I would like to run a job through cron that will be executed every second Tuesday at given time of day. For every Tuesday is easy:

0 6 * * Tue

But how to make it on "every second Tuesday" (or if you prefer - every second week)? I would not like to implement any logic in the script it self, but keep the definition only in cron.

  • see also unix.stackexchange.com/questions/197324/… – Jasen Jul 17 '16 at 20:52
  • 1
    How about running it every week and checking in your script (e.g. by using a separate file) whether it is the second week or the first? if [ "$(cat week.txt)" == "1" ]; then echo -n "0">week.txt; dostuff; fi – xdevs23 May 8 '17 at 14:27

11 Answers 11

43

How about this, it does keep it in the crontab even if it isn't exactly defined in the first five fields:

0 6 * * Tue expr `date +\%W` \% 2 > /dev/null || /scripts/fortnightly.sh
  • 6
    My guess is that this solution has a problem on the last week of the year. Sometimes the last Friday of the year is on week 51, and some other times on week 52. So that could make you run the script two weeks in a row or once in three weeks – Doppelganger Mar 1 '13 at 14:20
  • @Doppelganger, good catch. I think my answer avoids this. – pilcrow Oct 9 '13 at 17:22
44

Answer

Modify your Tuesday cron logic to execute every other week since the epoch.

Knowing that there are 604800 seconds in a week (ignoring DST changes and leap seconds, thank you), and using GNU date:

0 6 * * Tue expr `date +\%s` / 604800 \% 2 >/dev/null || /scripts/fortnightly.sh

Aside

Calendar arithmetic is frustrating.

@xahtep's answer is terrific but, as @Doppelganger noted in comments, it will fail on certain year boundaries. None of the date utility's "week of year" specifiers can help here. Some Tuesday in early January will inevitably repeat the week parity of the final Tuesday in the preceding year: 2016-01-05 (%V), 2018-01-02 (%U), and 2019-01-01 (%W).

  • This answer, or the alternate version of this using the seconds in a day (not week) e.g. 86400 also have a limitation in certain edge cases: the adjustment in UTC time vs. your local server. Suppose I have a cron job that will run every other Tuesday at 3 am and 11pm. You could end up in a scenario that according to UTC time (seconds since epoch) that these are being treated as different days. In my case 21600 is my local offset (sec) vs. the epoch: expr \( `date +%s` - 21600 \) / 86400 % 2 and, for testing expr \( `date +%s -d "Thursday"` - 21600 \) / 86400 % 2 – dxdc Dec 20 '16 at 2:23
  • See my answer below for a more complete solution. – dxdc Dec 21 '16 at 5:20
8

pilcrow's answer is great. However, it results in the fortnightly.sh script running every even week (since the epoch). If you need the script to run on odd weeks, you can tweak his answer a little:

0 6 * * Tue expr \( `date +\%s` / 604800 + 1 \) \% 2 > /dev/null || /scripts/fortnightly.sh

Changing the 1 to a 0 will move it back to even weeks.

3

Maybe a little dumb, but one could also create two cronjobs, one for every first tuesday and one for every third.

First cronjob:

0 0 8 ? 1/1 TUE#1 *

Second cronjob:

0 0 8 ? 1/1 TUE#3 *

Not sure about the syntax here, I used http://www.cronmaker.com/ to make these.

  • 2
    Scheduling the job for the first and third Tuesdays of each month will miss a month's fifth Tuesday (e.g., 31-Mar-2015), and of course adding that fifth Tuesday will run the job too frequently. Separately, this answer references the cron-like Quartz scheduler rather than traditional *NIX cron. – pilcrow Aug 21 '15 at 22:02
  • What does the '#' mean? – Asif Sep 2 '15 at 15:19
  • @Asif "It allows you to specify constructs such as "the second Friday" of a given month." en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cron – bigtex777 Jun 6 '16 at 22:37
  • 1
    @bigtex777: And which cron on which Linux distro implements that? It's certainly not POSIX. – Reinstate Monica - M. Schröder Sep 11 '18 at 11:25
2

If you want to do it based on a given start date:

0 6 * * 1 expr \( `date +\%s` / 86400 - `date --date='2018-03-19' +\%s` / 86400 \) \% 14 == 0 > /dev/null && /scripts/fortnightly.sh

Should fire every other Monday beginning with 2018-03-19

Expression reads: Run at 6am on Mondays if ...

1 - Get today's date, in seconds, divided by the number of seconds in a day to convert to days sice epoch

2 - Do the same for the starting date, converting it to the number of days since epoch

3 - Get the difference between the two

4 - divide by 14 and check the remainder

5- If the remainder is zero you are on the two-week cycle

1

I discovered some additional limitations of above approaches that can fail in some edge cases. For instance, consider:

@xahtep and @Doppelganger discussed issues using %W on certain year boundaries above.

@pilcrow's answer gets around this to some degree, however it too will fail on certain boundaries. Answers in this and or other related topics use the number of seconds in a day (vs. week), which also fail on certain boundaries for the same reasons.

This is because these approaches rely on UTC time (date +%s). Consider a case where we're running a job at 1am and 10pm every 2nd Tuesday.

Suppose GMT-2:

  • 1am local time = 11pm UTC yesterday
  • 10pm local time = 8pm UTC today

If we are only checking a single time each day, this will not be an issue, but if we are checking multiple times -- or if we are close to UTC time and daylight savings occurs, the script wouldn't consider these to be the same day.

To get around this, we need to calculate an offset from UTC based on our local timezone not UTC. I couldn't find a simple way to do this in BASH, so I developed a solution that uses a quick one liner in Perl to compute the offset from UTC in seconds.

This script takes advantage of date +%z, which outputs the local timezone.

Bash script:

TZ_OFFSET=$( date +%z | perl -ne '$_ =~ /([+-])(\d{2})(\d{2})/; print eval($1."60**2") * ($2 + $3/60);' )
DAY_PARITY=$(( ( `date +%s` + ${TZ_OFFSET} ) / 86400 % 2 ))

then, to determine whether the day is even or odd:

if [ ${DAY_PARITY} -eq 1 ]; then
...
else
...
fi
0

What about every 3rd week?

Here's my suggestion:

0 6 * * Tue expr `date +\%W` \% 3 == 0 > /dev/null || /scripts/fortnightly.sh

... or ...

0 6 * * Tue expr `date +\%W` \% 3 == 1 > /dev/null || /scripts/fortnightly.sh

... or of course ...

0 6 * * Tue expr `date +\%W` \% 3 == 2 > /dev/null || /scripts/fortnightly.sh

... depending on the week rotation.

-1

If you want every tuesday of second week only:

00 06 * * 2#2

  • 1
    Which cron on which Linux supports that? The standard cron on Linux uses # as comment delimiter. – Reinstate Monica - M. Schröder Sep 11 '18 at 11:27
-2

Syntax "/2" is not goes along with weekday. So my added to the smart above is simply use 1,15 on MonthDay filed.

0 6 1,15 * * /scripts/fornightly.sh > /dev/null 2>&1

  • 1
    Note that this runs on the 1st and 15th of each month, which is not fortnightly (every two weeks). Sometimes there are more than 4 weeks in a month. What you have here is "twice per month" and not "every other week". – Christopher Schultz Feb 5 '15 at 19:11
  • Hmm. I still can't figure out the solution for a similar request: a job to run at midday every alternate Monday throughout the year, regardless of the month. 0 12 * * 1/2 says "bad day-of-week". – Peter Flynn Apr 6 '16 at 13:08
-2

Why not something like

0 0 1-7,15-21,29-31 * 5

Is that appropriate?

  • 1
    This will only run the first, third, and fifth week of every month. – isaac Nov 26 '13 at 20:03
  • But if changed to 0 0 15-21 * 5 this would appear to do the trick. – Florian Heigl Jan 13 '14 at 12:12
  • 2
    Re-read the man page for crontab(5). Your format will run on every day for the first week, every day on the third week, and every day of the last week, plus any day that happens to be a Friday. That's a lot of runs. – Christopher Schultz Feb 5 '15 at 19:07
-3

Cron provides an 'every other' syntax "/2". Just follow the appropriate time unit field with "/2" and it will execute the cronjob 'every other time'. In your case...

0 6 * * Tue/2

The above should execute every other Tuesday.

  • 1
    I've tested this command, and it runs every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday; not every other Tuesday. – Matthew Piziak Jul 24 '13 at 18:02
  • 1
    Have you tested 0 6 * * Tue/14 by any chance ? – Patrice M. Oct 8 '13 at 4:51
  • pity - Tue/2 is not running on my system :( – xhudik Sep 17 '14 at 11:13

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