10

The code below is really self-explanatory.

How come I can say that the result of CreateLion(), a pointer to a struct that implements the Cat interface, is an instance of the Cat interface, and yet I cannot say that CreateLion() is of type "function that returns the Cat interface."

What is the standard Golang approach to achieving this type of behavior?

package main

import "fmt"

func main() {
    var lion Cat := CreateLion()
    lion.Meow()

    // this line breaks. Why?
    var cf CatFactory = CreateLion
}

type Cat interface {
    Meow()
}

type Lion struct {}
func (l Lion) Meow() {
    fmt.Println("Roar")
}

// define a functor that returns a Cat interface
type CatFactory func() Cat

// define a function that returns a pointer to a Lion struct
func CreateLion() *Lion {
    return &Lion{}
}
  • 3
    Go is not Java. Go has no inheritance and no "is a" concept. Your attempt to model your problem looks like a direct translation from Java to Go. This will not work. Technically joy miao's answer is a complete and sensible explanation. Go is statically typed and a *Lion is not a Cat, even if a *Lion is assignable to a variable of type Cat; but assignability plays no role while matching type signatures. There is no need for factories in Go. Take a look at how the stdlib does things and stop writing Java code in Go. – Volker Jan 26 '16 at 8:07
  • 1
    Using a function as a type is not something that is unique to Java, @Volker. This code is not translated from Java. – zian Jan 26 '16 at 16:11
9

Try this:

package main

import "fmt"

type Cat interface {
    Meow()
}

type Lion struct{}

func (l Lion) Meow() {
    fmt.Println("Roar")
}

type CatFactory func() Cat

func CreateLion() Cat {
    return Lion{}
}

func main() {
    lion := CreateLion()
    lion.Meow()

    var cf CatFactory = CreateLion
    fLion := cf()
    fLion.Meow()
}

In most cases, you can assign any type to base type interface{}. But situation changes if type of function parameter is a map[T]interface{}, []interface{} or func() interface{}. In this case the type must be the same.

  • 1
    Sure your code might work but this is not a good answer, he is not seeking for working code, he wants an explanation. – vutran Jan 26 '16 at 5:01
  • In my use case, the Cat interface is defined in a separate go package that I do not wish to import into the go package where the Lion struct is defined. So I cannot just change the return type of the CreateLion function as you have suggested. – zian Jan 26 '16 at 5:18
  • You can't assign func struct to func interface{}. Situation similar []interface{} - []struct. Because it's different types. – Oleksiy Chechel Jan 26 '16 at 7:17
  • This answer is bad because now CreateLion returns a Cat, and you don't have access to any of the Lion-specific behaviors anymore. It makes sense for CatFactory to return a cat, but CreateLion should be returning a Lion. – Ehsan Kia Jan 10 at 2:35
  • @EhsanKia you have access to Lion methods: play.golang.org/p/Xsz7NvEm4v5 – Oleksiy Chechel Feb 1 at 12:45
3

I think you should read this blog http://blog.golang.org/laws-of-reflection,it is precise about the relation between variables,types and interfaces.

In your example *Lion is different with Cat.

You can correct function CreateLion returns from *Lion to Cat.

2

The problem here is that statically typed go differentiates the "this is a function that returns a cat" from "this is a function that returns a lion that is a cat" And therefore will not accept one as the other.

The way to fix this is to give your factory var exactly what it expects:

var cf CatFactory = func() Cat{
    return CreateLion()
}
catlion := cf()
catlion.Meow()

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