224

I wrote this function to read a line from a file:

const char *readLine(FILE *file) {

    if (file == NULL) {
        printf("Error: file pointer is null.");
        exit(1);
    }

    int maximumLineLength = 128;
    char *lineBuffer = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * maximumLineLength);

    if (lineBuffer == NULL) {
        printf("Error allocating memory for line buffer.");
        exit(1);
    }

    char ch = getc(file);
    int count = 0;

    while ((ch != '\n') && (ch != EOF)) {
        if (count == maximumLineLength) {
            maximumLineLength += 128;
            lineBuffer = realloc(lineBuffer, maximumLineLength);
            if (lineBuffer == NULL) {
                printf("Error reallocating space for line buffer.");
                exit(1);
            }
        }
        lineBuffer[count] = ch;
        count++;

        ch = getc(file);
    }

    lineBuffer[count] = '\0';
    char line[count + 1];
    strncpy(line, lineBuffer, (count + 1));
    free(lineBuffer);
    const char *constLine = line;
    return constLine;
}

The function reads the file correctly, and using printf I see that the constLine string did get read correctly as well.

However, if I use the function e.g. like this:

while (!feof(myFile)) {
    const char *line = readLine(myFile);
    printf("%s\n", line);
}

printf outputs gibberish. Why?

2
  • 1
    Use fgets instead of fgetc. You are reading character by character instead of line by line.
    – Shiv
    Mar 17 '17 at 4:00
  • 4
    Note that getline() is a part of POSIX 2008. There may be POSIX-like platforms without it, especially if they don't support the rest of POSIX 2008, but within the world of POSIX systems, getline() is pretty portable these days. May 8 '17 at 21:20

17 Answers 17

350

If your task is not to invent the line-by-line reading function, but just to read the file line-by-line, you may use a typical code snippet involving the getline() function (see the manual page here):

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{
    FILE * fp;
    char * line = NULL;
    size_t len = 0;
    ssize_t read;

    fp = fopen("/etc/motd", "r");
    if (fp == NULL)
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);

    while ((read = getline(&line, &len, fp)) != -1) {
        printf("Retrieved line of length %zu:\n", read);
        printf("%s", line);
    }

    fclose(fp);
    if (line)
        free(line);
    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}
20
  • 20
    More precisely, this getline is specific to GNU libc, i.e., to Linux. However, if the intent is to have a line-reading function (as opposed to learning C), there are several public domain line-reading functions available on the web. Aug 17 '10 at 11:55
  • 14
    Why should I do that? Read the manual, buffer is reallocated at each call, then it should be freed at the end.
    – mbaitoff
    Nov 30 '12 at 12:43
  • 35
    The if(line) check is superfluous. Calling free(NULL) is essentially a no-op.
    – aroth
    Jan 28 '14 at 7:25
  • 7
    @PhilipAdler If you really wanna fight over free(NULL) being non specified (although I am pretty sure it is nowhere written like this), then you should know that even ls calls free(NULL). After checking, the man page says that free(ptr); free(ptr); is undefined, and that free(NULL) does nothing. @mbaitoff Then why do you bother freeing line then ? Still, this website is all about teaching or helping with the best solution possible, and freeing every allocated memory that isn't used anymore is actually the good practice to have.
    – Jerska
    Jun 13 '14 at 18:59
  • 61
    For those who said that this getline is specific to GNU libc, "Both getline() and getdelim() were originally GNU extensions. They were standardized in POSIX.1-2008."
    – willkill07
    Apr 21 '15 at 21:01
54
FILE* filePointer;
int bufferLength = 255;
char buffer[bufferLength];

filePointer = fopen("file.txt", "r");

while(fgets(buffer, bufferLength, filePointer)) {
    printf("%s\n", buffer);
}

fclose(filePointer);
4
  • For me this results in overwriting each line with the next. See this question based on the above answer. Jan 8 '19 at 3:09
  • 6
    Why the cast (FILE*) fp ? Isn't fp is already a FILE * and also fopen() returns a FILE * ? Apr 4 '19 at 23:25
  • 2
    If you're ok with lines being limited to a certain length, this is the best answer. Otherwise using getline is a good alternative. I agree the FILE * cast is unnecessary.
    – theicfire
    Oct 17 '19 at 2:18
  • I removed the un-necessary cast, added a variable for the buffer length and changed fp to filePointer for more clarity.
    – Rob
    Jan 6 '20 at 11:13
22

In your readLine function, you return a pointer to the line array (Strictly speaking, a pointer to its first character, but the difference is irrelevant here). Since it's an automatic variable (i.e., it's “on the stack”), the memory is reclaimed when the function returns. You see gibberish because printf has put its own stuff on the stack.

You need to return a dynamically allocated buffer from the function. You already have one, it's lineBuffer; all you have to do is truncate it to the desired length.

    lineBuffer[count] = '\0';
    realloc(lineBuffer, count + 1);
    return lineBuffer;
}

ADDED (response to follow-up question in comment): readLine returns a pointer to the characters that make up the line. This pointer is what you need to work with the contents of the line. It's also what you must pass to free when you've finished using the memory taken by these characters. Here's how you might use the readLine function:

char *line = readLine(file);
printf("LOG: read a line: %s\n", line);
if (strchr(line, 'a')) { puts("The line contains an a"); }
/* etc. */
free(line);
/* After this point, the memory allocated for the line has been reclaimed.
   You can't use the value of `line` again (though you can assign a new value
   to the `line` variable if you want). */
2
  • @Iron: I've added something to my answer, but I'm not sure what your difficulty is so it may be off the mark. Aug 17 '10 at 11:53
  • @Iron: the answer is that you don't free it. You document (in the API documentation) the fact that the returned buffer is malloc'd ansd needs to be freed by the caller. Then people who use your readLine function will (hopefully!) write code similar to the snippet that Gilles has added to his answer.
    – JeremyP
    Aug 17 '10 at 12:27
16
//open and get the file handle
FILE* fh;
fopen_s(&fh, filename, "r");

//check if file exists
if (fh == NULL){
    printf("file does not exists %s", filename);
    return 0;
}


//read line by line
const size_t line_size = 300;
char* line = malloc(line_size);
while (fgets(line, line_size, fh) != NULL)  {
    printf(line);
}
free(line);    // dont forget to free heap memory
4
  • 2
    There are some problems with this code: fopen_s makes the code unportable. printf will look for format specifiers and not print percent signs and the following character(s) as they are. Null bytes will make all the characters in the rest of the line vanish. (Do not tell me null bytes cannot happen!)
    – hagello
    Mar 17 '16 at 20:59
  • And by the way, you do not solve the problem. The OP describes that the return value of his function disappears. I do not see you addressing this problem.
    – hagello
    Mar 17 '16 at 21:01
  • @Hartley I know this is an older comment, but I am adding this so that someone doesn't read his comment and try to free(line) in the loop. The memory for line is only allocated once before the loop begins, so it should only be free once after the loop ends. If you try freeing line inside the loop, you will get unexpected results. Depending on how free() treats the pointer. If it just deallocates memory and leaves the pointer pointing at the old location the code may work. If it assigns another value to the pointer then you will overwrite a different section of memory.
    – alaniane
    Jan 20 '18 at 3:06
  • 2
    printf(line) is wrong! Do not do this. This opens your code to a string format vulnerability where you can freely read/write directly to memory via the stuff being printed. If I were to put %n/%p in the file and point the pointer back to an address in memory (in the string from the file) that I controlled, I could execute that code.
    – oxagast
    Aug 7 '18 at 18:53
11

readLine() returns pointer to local variable, which causes undefined behaviour.

To get around you can:

  1. Create variable in caller function and pass its address to readLine()
  2. Allocate memory for line using malloc() - in this case line will be persistent
  3. Use global variable, although it is generally a bad practice
0
9

Use fgets() to read a line from a file handle.

9

A complete, fgets() solution:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

#define MAX_LEN 256

int main(void)
{
    FILE* fp;
    fp = fopen("file.txt", "r");
    if (fp == NULL) {
      perror("Failed: ");
      return 1;
    }

    char buffer[MAX_LEN];
    // -1 to allow room for NULL terminator for really long string
    while (fgets(buffer, MAX_LEN - 1, fp))
    {
        // Remove trailing newline
        buffer[strcspn(buffer, "\n")] = 0;
        printf("%s\n", buffer);
    }

    fclose(fp);
    return 0;
}

Output:

First line of file
Second line of file
Third (and also last) line of file

Remember, if you want to read from Standard Input (rather than a file as in this case), then all you have to do is pass stdin as the third parameter of fgets() method, like this:

while(fgets(buffer, MAX_LEN - 1, stdin))

Appendix

Removing trailing newline character from fgets() input

how to detect a file is opened or not in c

2
  • 1
    Hi, @gsamaras I think we can directly pass MAX_LEN to fgets. I found this piece of description in: linux.die.net/man/3/fgets ``` ``` Nov 17 '20 at 10:23
  • Hey @juancortez, I am passing MAX_LEN - 1 at the 2nd argument of the method indeed!
    – gsamaras
    Nov 17 '20 at 19:36
4

Some things wrong with the example:

  • you forgot to add \n to your printfs. Also error messages should go to stderr i.e. fprintf(stderr, ....
  • (not a biggy but) consider using fgetc() rather than getc(). getc() is a macro, fgetc() is a proper function
  • getc() returns an int so ch should be declared as an int. This is important since the comparison with EOF will be handled correctly. Some 8 bit character sets use 0xFF as a valid character (ISO-LATIN-1 would be an example) and EOF which is -1, will be 0xFF if assigned to a char.
  • There is a potential buffer overflow at the line

    lineBuffer[count] = '\0';
    

    If the line is exactly 128 characters long, count is 128 at the point that gets executed.

  • As others have pointed out, line is a locally declared array. You can't return a pointer to it.

  • strncpy(count + 1) will copy at most count + 1 characters but will terminate if it hits '\0' Because you set lineBuffer[count] to '\0' you know it will never get to count + 1. However, if it did, it would not put a terminating '\0' on, so you need to do it. You often see something like the following:

    char buffer [BUFFER_SIZE];
    strncpy(buffer, sourceString, BUFFER_SIZE - 1);
    buffer[BUFFER_SIZE - 1] = '\0';
    
  • if you malloc() a line to return (in place of your local char array), your return type should be char* - drop the const.

2
const char *readLine(FILE *file, char* line) {

    if (file == NULL) {
        printf("Error: file pointer is null.");
        exit(1);
    }

    int maximumLineLength = 128;
    char *lineBuffer = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char) * maximumLineLength);

    if (lineBuffer == NULL) {
        printf("Error allocating memory for line buffer.");
        exit(1);
    }

    char ch = getc(file);
    int count = 0;

    while ((ch != '\n') && (ch != EOF)) {
        if (count == maximumLineLength) {
            maximumLineLength += 128;
            lineBuffer = realloc(lineBuffer, maximumLineLength);
            if (lineBuffer == NULL) {
                printf("Error reallocating space for line buffer.");
                exit(1);
            }
        }
        lineBuffer[count] = ch;
        count++;

        ch = getc(file);
    }

    lineBuffer[count] = '\0';
    char line[count + 1];
    strncpy(line, lineBuffer, (count + 1));
    free(lineBuffer);
    return line;

}


char linebuffer[256];
while (!feof(myFile)) {
    const char *line = readLine(myFile, linebuffer);
    printf("%s\n", line);
}

note that the 'line' variable is declared in calling function and then passed, so your readLine function fills predefined buffer and just returns it. This is the way most of C libraries work.

There are other ways, which I'm aware of:

  • defining the char line[] as static (static char line[MAX_LINE_LENGTH] -> it will hold it's value AFTER returning from the function). -> bad, the function is not reentrant, and race condition can occur -> if you call it twice from two threads, it will overwrite it's results
  • malloc()ing the char line[], and freeing it in calling functions -> too many expensive mallocs, and, delegating the responsibility to free the buffer to another function (the most elegant solution is to call malloc and free on any buffers in same function)

btw, 'explicit' casting from char* to const char* is redundant.

btw2, there is no need to malloc() the lineBuffer, just define it char lineBuffer[128], so you don't need to free it

btw3 do not use 'dynamic sized stack arrays' (defining the array as char arrayName[some_nonconstant_variable]), if you don't exactly know what are you doing, it works only in C99.

1
  • 1
    note that the 'line' variable is declared in calling function and then passed, - you probably should have deleted the local declaration of line in the function then. Also, you need to tell the function how long the buffer is that you are passing and think of a strategy for handling lines that are too long for the buffer you pass in.
    – JeremyP
    Aug 17 '10 at 11:50
2
void readLine(FILE* file, char* line, int limit)
{
    int i;
    int read;

    read = fread(line, sizeof(char), limit, file);
    line[read] = '\0';

    for(i = 0; i <= read;i++)
    {
        if('\0' == line[i] || '\n' == line[i] || '\r' == line[i])
        {
            line[i] = '\0';
            break;
        }
    }

    if(i != read)
    {
        fseek(file, i - read + 1, SEEK_CUR);
    }
}

what about this one?

2

Implement method to read, and get content from a file (input1.txt)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void testGetFile() {
    // open file
    FILE *fp = fopen("input1.txt", "r");
    size_t len = 255;
    // need malloc memory for line, if not, segmentation fault error will occurred.
    char *line = malloc(sizeof(char) * len);
    // check if file exist (and you can open it) or not
    if (fp == NULL) {
        printf("can open file input1.txt!");
        return;
    }
    while(fgets(line, len, fp) != NULL) {
        printf("%s\n", line);
    }
    free(line);
}

Hope this help. Happy coding!

2

Here is my several hours... Reading whole file line by line.

char * readline(FILE *fp, char *buffer)
{
    int ch;
    int i = 0;
    size_t buff_len = 0;

    buffer = malloc(buff_len + 1);
    if (!buffer) return NULL;  // Out of memory

    while ((ch = fgetc(fp)) != '\n' && ch != EOF)
    {
        buff_len++;
        void *tmp = realloc(buffer, buff_len + 1);
        if (tmp == NULL)
        {
            free(buffer);
            return NULL; // Out of memory
        }
        buffer = tmp;

        buffer[i] = (char) ch;
        i++;
    }
    buffer[i] = '\0';

    // Detect end
    if (ch == EOF && (i == 0 || ferror(fp)))
    {
        free(buffer);
        return NULL;
    }
    return buffer;
}

void lineByline(FILE * file){
char *s;
while ((s = readline(file, 0)) != NULL)
{
    puts(s);
    free(s);
    printf("\n");
}
}

int main()
{
    char *fileName = "input-1.txt";
    FILE* file = fopen(fileName, "r");
    lineByline(file);
    return 0;
}
1
  • 1
    Why are you using fgetc instead of fgets?
    – theicfire
    Oct 17 '19 at 2:14
1

You should use the ANSI functions for reading a line, eg. fgets. After calling you need free() in calling context, eg:

...
const char *entirecontent=readLine(myFile);
puts(entirecontent);
free(entirecontent);
...

const char *readLine(FILE *file)
{
  char *lineBuffer=calloc(1,1), line[128];

  if ( !file || !lineBuffer )
  {
    fprintf(stderr,"an ErrorNo 1: ...");
    exit(1);
  }

  for(; fgets(line,sizeof line,file) ; strcat(lineBuffer,line) )
  {
    if( strchr(line,'\n') ) *strchr(line,'\n')=0;
    lineBuffer=realloc(lineBuffer,strlen(lineBuffer)+strlen(line)+1);
    if( !lineBuffer )
    {
      fprintf(stderr,"an ErrorNo 2: ...");
      exit(2);
    }
  }
  return lineBuffer;
}
1

My implement from scratch:

FILE *pFile = fopen(your_file_path, "r");
int nbytes = 1024;
char *line = (char *) malloc(nbytes);
char *buf = (char *) malloc(nbytes);

size_t bytes_read;
int linesize = 0;
while (fgets(buf, nbytes, pFile) != NULL) {
    bytes_read = strlen(buf);
    // if line length larger than size of line buffer
    if (linesize + bytes_read > nbytes) {
        char *tmp = line;
        nbytes += nbytes / 2;
        line = (char *) malloc(nbytes);
        memcpy(line, tmp, linesize);
        free(tmp);
    }
    memcpy(line + linesize, buf, bytes_read);
    linesize += bytes_read;

    if (feof(pFile) || buf[bytes_read-1] == '\n') {
        handle_line(line);
        linesize = 0;
        memset(line, '\0', nbytes);
    }
}

free(buf);
free(line);
1
  • Why are you using the heap (malloc) instead of the stack? It seems there's a simpler stack based solution with fgets that could be used.
    – theicfire
    Oct 17 '19 at 2:13
1

Provide a portable and generic getdelim function, test passed via msvc, clang, gcc.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

ssize_t
portabl_getdelim(char ** restrict linep,
                 size_t * restrict linecapp,
                 int delimiter,
                 FILE * restrict stream) {
    if (0 == *linep) {
        *linecapp = 8;
        *linep = malloc(*linecapp);
        if (0 == *linep) {
            return EOF;
        }
    }

    ssize_t linelen = 0;
    int c = 0;
    char *p = *linep;

    while (EOF != (c = fgetc(stream))) {
        if (linelen == (ssize_t) *linecapp - 1) {
            *linecapp <<= 1;
            char *p1 = realloc(*linep, *linecapp);
            if (0 == *p1) {
                return EOF;
            }
            p = p1 + linelen;
        }
        *p++ = c;
        linelen++;

        if (delimiter == c) {
            *p = 0;
            return linelen;
        }
    }
    return EOF == c ? EOF : linelen;
}


int
main(int argc, char **argv) {
    const char *filename = "/a/b/c.c";
    FILE *file = fopen(filename, "r");
    if (!file) {
        perror(filename);
        return 1;
    }

    char *line = 0;
    size_t linecap = 0;
    ssize_t linelen;

    while (0 < (linelen = portabl_getdelim(&line, &linecap, '\n', file))) {
        fwrite(line, linelen, 1, stdout);
    }
    if (line) {
        free(line);
    }
    fclose(file);   

    return 0;
}
9
  • Why do this when fgets exists?
    – theicfire
    Oct 17 '19 at 2:11
  • does fgets can customize line delimiters or customize what to do about current lines?
    – 南山竹
    Oct 17 '19 at 5:31
  • getdelim allows for customized delimiters. Also I do notice don't have a line length limit -- in this case you can use the stack with getline. (Both described here: man7.org/linux/man-pages/man3/getline.3.html)
    – theicfire
    Oct 17 '19 at 16:04
  • do you talk about just Linux , the question is about how to read line in C, right?
    – 南山竹
    Oct 17 '19 at 16:52
  • This works for any standard c implementation (getdelim and getline were standardized in POSIX.1-2008, someone else mentions on this page). fgets is also standard c, and not linux specific
    – theicfire
    Oct 17 '19 at 17:15
0

You make the mistake of returning a pointer to an automatic variable. The variable line is allocated in the stack and only lives as long as the function lives. You are not allowed to return a pointer to it, because as soon as it returns the memory will be given elsewhere.

const char* func x(){
    char line[100];
    return (const char*) line; //illegal
}

To avoid this, you either return a pointer to memory which resides on the heap eg. lineBuffer and it should be the user's responsibility to call free() when he is done with it. Alternatively you can ask the user to pass you as an argument a memory address on which to write the line contents at.

1
  • There is a difference between illegal and undefine behavior ^^.
    – Phong
    Jun 27 '13 at 8:33
0

I want a code from ground 0 so i did this to read the content of dictionary's word line by line.

char temp_str[20]; // you can change the buffer size according to your requirements And A single line's length in a File.

Note I've initialized the buffer With Null character each time I read line.This function can be Automated But Since I need A proof of Concept and want to design a programme Byte By Byte

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
int i;
char temp_ch;
FILE *fp=fopen("data.txt","r");
while(temp_ch!=EOF)
{
 i=0;
  char temp_str[20]={'\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0','\0'};
while(temp_ch!='\n')
{
  temp_ch=fgetc(fp);
  temp_str[i]=temp_ch;
  i++;
}
if(temp_ch=='\n')
{
temp_ch=fgetc(fp);
temp_str[i]=temp_ch;
}
printf("%s",temp_str);
}
return 0;
}
3
  • your program would work if your brackets were in the right places ;) e.g. int main() {
    – dylnmc
    Aug 7 '15 at 22:21
  • Incidentally, you don't need to specify all 20 '\0'. You can just write: code char temp_str[20] = {'\0'}; code c will automatically fill each slot with a null terminator since the way array declarations work is that if an array is initialized with less elements that the array contains, the last element will be fill out the remaining elements.
    – alaniane
    Jan 20 '18 at 2:52
  • I believe char temp_str[20] = {0} also fills up the entire character array with null terminators.
    – thuyein
    Nov 26 '18 at 8:40

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