7

I want to have an enum like the following and then have a method something like Util.FindFruitByValue("A") which returns the enum Apple. this is because the abbreviations are stored in database and I need to convert them to appropriate enums after reading from db. is this possible OR do I need to create a separate class for it? Please let me know. thanks in advance.

public enum Fruit
{
    Apple = "A"
    Banana = "B"
    Cherry = "C"
}

Update: this is like a lookup table, but the difference is the value is string instead of an int. I am populating a business object, by reading the values from database and I would like to use a type with fixed values for the object property instead of string.

  • What are you going to be using the Enum for? Why can't you use the "A", "B", "C" for the names of your Enum values? Or is it possible to pass in the full name of your values rather than the abbreviations? – Benjol Aug 17 '10 at 11:50
  • I have a business object and some of its properties correspond to the fixed abbreviated values in database. so to make the property strongly typed (and show full text for the abbreviation on screen), I thought of using an enum instead of creating a separate class for it, but unfortunately enums can only have integer values. that's why the question. – RKP Aug 17 '10 at 12:44
20

I solved the problem by using the Description attribute on the enum. the solution is as follows. I use the extension method to get the description. the code to get the description is taken from this link http://blog.spontaneouspublicity.com/post/2008/01/17/Associating-Strings-with-enums-in-C.aspx. thanks for your replies.

    public enum Fruit
{
    [Description("Apple")]
    A,
    [Description("Banana")]
    B,
    [Description("Cherry")]
    C
}

public static class Util
{
    public static T StringToEnum<T>(string name)
    {
        return (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), name);
    }

    public static string ToDescriptionString(this Enum value)
    {
        FieldInfo fi = value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString());

        DescriptionAttribute[] attributes =
            (DescriptionAttribute[])fi.GetCustomAttributes(
            typeof(DescriptionAttribute),
            false);

        if (attributes != null &&
            attributes.Length > 0)
            return attributes[0].Description;
        else
            return value.ToString();
    }
}
  • 1
    Nothin' like a bit of Reflection... – RobS Aug 18 '10 at 1:46
  • actually reflection is slow in general, but I couldn't figure out any other way to solve this problem. I need a type with fixed values and instead of creating a custom class for different types of such information, enum is convenient to use, but lacks support for string values which is why I had to choose this option. I would welcome any suggestions to accomplish this in a better way. – RKP Aug 18 '10 at 15:35
12

You can put the values in a Dictionary to efficiently look them up:

Dictionary<string, Fruit> fruitValues = new Dictionary<string, Fruit>();
fruitValues.Add("A", Fruit.Apple);
fruitValues.Add("B", Fruit.Banana);
fruitValues.Add("C", Fruit.Cherry);

Lookup:

string dataName = "A";
Fruit f = fruitValues[dataName];

If the value may be non-existent:

string dataName = "A";
Fruit f;
if (fruitValues.TryGetValue(dataName, out f)) {
  // got the value
} else {
  // there is no value for that string
}
2

I have written a library that handles precisely this problem. It was originally intended just to do the opposite (return a string value from and Enum) but once I'd written that, being able to parse a string back into its Enum, was only a short step.

The library is called EnumStringValues and is available from nuget in VS (package page is here too: https://www.nuget.org/packages/EnumStringValues) SourceCode is on GitHub here: https://github.com/Brondahl/EnumStringValues

Thoughts and comments are welcome. Inspiration obviously comes from the well publicised Attribute approach referenced in other answers here.

1

How about using Hashtable?

  • +1 but Dictionary is better – Mina Gabriel Mar 6 '14 at 20:15
1

Sorry, I overlooked the definition of the OP's Enum. Obviously, the Enum values have to be a numeric type, so the OP's definition won't work.

One thought I had was to use the char value as the Enum value, e.g.

public enum Fruit
{
    Apple  = 65, //"A",
    Banana = 66, // "B",
    Cherry = 67 //"C"
}

As per Convert.ToInt32('A') - not sure what to do with case sensitivity here. Then, grab the correct result by casting. I'm still playing around with an example, happy to hear some suggestions.

OK, sorry for the delay. Here's a bit more on this:

public static class EnumConverter<T>
{
    public static T ToEnum(char charToConvert, out bool success)
    {
        try
        {                
            int intValue = Convert.ToInt32(charToConvert);                
            if (Enum.IsDefined(typeof(T), intValue))
            {
                success = true;
                return (T)Enum.ToObject(typeof(T), intValue);
            }
       }
       catch (ArgumentException ex)
       {
               // Use your own Exception Management Here
       }
       catch (InvalidCastException ex)
       {
           // Use your own Exception Management Here
       }
       success = false;
       return default(T);
    }
}

Usage:

bool success = false;
Fruit selected = EnumConverter<Fruit>.ToEnum('A', out success);
if (success)
{
   // go for broke
}
  • He wants to put in "A" and get out Fruit.Apple, is that what your code does? – Benjol Aug 17 '10 at 11:48
  • @Benjol : Yes, that's what it does. It will also return Fruit.Apple for the string "Apple". – Lazarus Aug 17 '10 at 11:50
  • 1
    Can you show how the Fruit enum should be defined to make this work? – Ben Voigt Aug 17 '10 at 11:59
  • Obviously you can't have an Enum with string values, what you could do is convert 'A', 'B' to Int and then do a cast. E.g. Apple = 65 – RobS Aug 17 '10 at 12:17
0

I made a little DynamicEnum Class that makes it super easy to pull enums in and out of both domain and data repositories.

public abstract class DynamicEnum<T> : IEquatable<T>, IComparable<T>
    where T : DynamicEnum<T>, new()
{
    #region Instance

    public int PathCode { get; private set; }
    public string PathValue { get; private set; }

    protected DynamicEnum() { }

    protected DynamicEnum(int pathCode, string pathValue)
    {
        PathCode = pathCode;
        PathValue = PathValue;
    }

    #region IEquatable<AreaStatus> Members

    public bool Equals(T other)
    {
        return PathCode == other.PathCode;
    }

    #endregion

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        return Equals(obj as T);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return PathCode.GetHashCode();
    }

    #region IComparable<AreaStatus> Members

    public int CompareTo(T other)
    {
        return PathCode.CompareTo(other.PathCode);
    }

    #endregion

    #endregion

    #region Class / Static

    static DynamicEnum()
    {
        // Despite appearances, static methods are not really inherited by
        // child classes. This means when the mapping fields below are accessed
        // by an implementing class the CLR does not see it as a method on that
        // class. In the event that the implementing class's static constructor
        // hasn't been called yet, it will not be called at that point since
        // technically no static method/property or instance of the implementing
        // class has been used. Working around this by creating an instance here
        // which causes the derived class's static constructor to be called
        // beforehand. This could alternately be solved by moving the default 'enum'
        // value initialization out of the implementing classes to the Global.asax 
        // where the database 'enum' values are optionally loaded.
        new T();
    }

    public static void Initialize(IEnumerable<T> statuses)
    {
        IntoDomainMapping = statuses.ToDictionary(x => x.PathValue, x => x);
        IntoDBMapping = IntoDomainMapping.ToDictionary(x => x.Value, x => x.Key);
    }

    public static Dictionary<string, T> IntoDomainMapping { get; protected set; }
    public static Dictionary<T, string> IntoDBMapping { get; protected set; }

    #endregion

    #region Operator Overloads

    public static bool operator ==(DynamicEnum<T> s1, T s2)
    {
        return s1.Equals(s2);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(DynamicEnum<T> s1, T s2)
    {
        return !s1.Equals(s2);
    }

    public static bool operator >(DynamicEnum<T> s1, T s2)
    {
        return s1.CompareTo(s2) > 0;
    }

    public static bool operator <(DynamicEnum<T> s1, T s2)
    {
        return s1.CompareTo(s2) < 0;
    }

    public static bool operator >=(DynamicEnum<T> s1, T s2)
    {
        return s1.CompareTo(s2) >= 0;
    }

    public static bool operator <=(DynamicEnum<T> s1, T s2)
    {
        return s1.CompareTo(s2) <= 0;
    }

    #endregion
}

Here is the "Enum" class

    public class ResourcePath : DynamicEnum<ResourcePath>
{
    public ResourcePath() { }

    public ResourcePath(int pathCode, string pathValue) 
        : base(pathCode, pathValue) { }


    static ResourcePath()
    {
        Initialize(new List<ResourcePath>
            {
                new ResourcePath(1, "customer.list"),
                new ResourcePath(1, "customer.create"),
                new ResourcePath(1, "customer.info"),
                new ResourcePath(1, "customer.update"),
                new ResourcePath(1, "customer.delete"),
            });
    }

    public static ResourcePath Deleted
    { 
        get { return ResourcePath.IntoDomainMapping["DE"]};
    }
}

Finally basic usage

var resource = GetAllResources().Where(e => e.PathCode == pathCode).firstOrDefault();
0

I know it's an old post but I had a similar problem and I found yesterday a solution for it.

You can use the type safe enum pattern like in this post described:

https://stackoverflow.com/a/424414/1257584

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