so here is my code (not working) what I want to do is loop through the hashmap and return a new hashmap with squared number so that any hashmap goes into function pow as an argument. and I want to do it in ES6 way.

 var numbers = {};
numbers['two'] = [2, 4, 9];
numbers['one'] = [1, 2, 3];
function pow(arr){
 for (var x in arr){
  x.map(function(value)){
    return value*value;
  }
 }
}          
pow(numbers);
  • 1
    When you use for..in, your x is the key, not the value of the object. – Rocket Hazmat Jan 26 '16 at 21:35
  • 1
    You have a parameter arr, but you're passing in an object ("hashmap") instead of an array. – Lucas Jan 26 '16 at 21:42
  • Except replacing the function expression with an arrow function, there is nothing you would do differently with ES6. – Felix Kling Jan 26 '16 at 23:50
  • Given that you've tagged this ES6, why don't you use a Map and for of loops? – Bergi Jan 27 '16 at 1:38

As Rocket commented above, when using a for...in loop, x is the index, not the actual value. You'll need to use arr[x] instead of simply x in your loop.

You can use arr.forEach() to iterate through an array's values in a more intuitive way, but there are compatibility considerations with that method, so your ability to use it may depend on where you're running the code. (More information here.) However, in this case, as Lucas pointed out in the comments, you're passing in an object, not an array, so forEach() will not work.

This does what you are looking for...as previously stated x in the for loop is the index. You would use arr[x] to get the array such as numbers['one']. You have to redefine the arr[x] with the new map you return. This does the trick. In ES6 you could destructure and then loop through. Feel free to ask for that if you'd like.

function pow(hm) {
    for (var x in arr) {
        hm[x] = hm[x].map(function(value) {
            return value*value;
        });
    }

    return hm;
}
  • OP said "return a new hashmap", so don't assign to arr. – Bergi Jan 27 '16 at 1:39

ok I solved it `

var numbers = {};
 numbers['one'] = [2, 4, 9];
 numbers['two'] = [1, 6, 8];
function pow(arr) {

     var arr1 = arr.map(function(value) {
          return value*value;
        });
    return arr1;
  }
console.log(pow(numbers['two']));
pow(numbers['two']);

` this is what I want - it's here http://jsbin.com/bicamimifi/edit?js,console,output

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