102

I want to convert a string to a generic type like int or date or long based on the generic return type.

Basically a function like Parse<T>(String) that returns an item of type T.

For example if a int was passed the function should do int.parse internally.

144

System.Convert.ChangeType

As per your example, you could do:

int i = (int)Convert.ChangeType("123", typeof(int));
DateTime dt = (DateTime)Convert.ChangeType("2009/12/12", typeof(DateTime));

To satisfy your "generic return type" requirement, you could write your own extension method:

public static T ChangeType<T>(this object obj)
{
    return (T)Convert.ChangeType(obj, typeof(T));
}

This will allow you to do:

int i = "123".ChangeType<int>();
6
  • cool , but the strange thing its named ChangeType , so i would thought that this function does some kind of cast and not parse
    – Karim
    Aug 17 '10 at 12:51
  • 7
    MSDN says it is simply a wrapper that finds the right conversion method on the source object, requiring that it implements the IConvertible interface.
    – Ani
    Aug 17 '10 at 12:58
  • If it needs to implement IConvertable shouldn't you also constrain the T, i.e. T ChangeType<T>(this object obj) where T : IConvertable?
    – Liam
    Jul 30 '15 at 9:16
  • 3
    @Liam: No, it's obj that must be IConvertible, but there's no way to specify that at compile-time.
    – Ani
    Jul 30 '15 at 10:41
  • if I need something like TryChangeType that returns null or false in fail case? Only by catching exception?
    – Hopeless
    Oct 15 '15 at 14:07
25

Well looks like I am too late for answering on this thread. But here is my implementation:

Basically, I have created an Extention method for the Object class. It handles all the types, i.e nullable, classes, and struct.

 public static T ConvertTo<T>(this object value)
           {
               T returnValue;

               if (value is T variable)
                   returnValue = variable;
               else
                   try
                   {
                       //Handling Nullable types i.e, int?, double?, bool? .. etc
                       if (Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(typeof(T)) != null)
                       {
                           TypeConverter conv = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T));
                           returnValue = (T) conv.ConvertFrom(value);
                       }
                       else
                       {
                           returnValue = (T) Convert.ChangeType(value, typeof(T));
                       }
                   }
                   catch (Exception)
                   {
                       returnValue = default(T);
                   }

               return returnValue;
           }
2
  • 1
    IMHO this is the better answer cause it also contains the "nullable"-aspect
    – Ole Albers
    Apr 11 '18 at 9:04
  • is there a specific reason why you are using TypeDescriptor for nullable types and Convert.ChangeType for non-nullable ones? This whole try block can be reduced only to TypeConverter 2 lines of code and it will work for both, nullable and non-nullable.
    – IMujagic
    Jan 17 '20 at 8:38
12

cleaner version of Pranay's answer

public static T ConvertTo<T>(this object value)
{
    if (value is T variable) return variable;

    try
    {
        //Handling Nullable types i.e, int?, double?, bool? .. etc
        if (Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(typeof(T)) != null)
        {
            return (T)TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(T)).ConvertFrom(value);
        }

        return (T)Convert.ChangeType(value, typeof(T));
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        return default(T);
    }
}
9

System.Convert.ChangeType does not convert to any type. Think of the following:

  • nullable types
  • enums
  • Guid etc.

These conversions are possible with this implementation of ChangeType.

0

There are a couple of conventions in the .NET to convert objects of one type to another.

But these methods are much slower than your typical T.Parse(string), cause boxing and involve lots of allocations each time you want to convert a single value.

For ValueString, I chose to find a suitable, static parsing method of the type using reflection, build a lambda expression calling it and cache the compiled delegate for future use (See this answer for an example).

It also fallbacks to the ways I mentioned above if the type doesn't have a suitable parsing method (See the performance section in the readme).

var v = new ValueString("15"); // struct
var i = v.As<int>(); // Calls int.Parse.

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