11

I have a pandas dataframe time column like following.

 segments_data['time']
 Out[1585]: 
 0      04:50:00
 1      04:50:00
 2      05:00:00
 3      05:12:00
 4      06:04:00
 5      06:44:00
 6      06:44:00
 7      06:47:00
 8      06:47:00
 9      06:47:00

I want to add 5 hours and 30 mins to above time column. I am doing following in python.

pd.DatetimeIndex(segments_data['time']) + pd.DateOffset(hours=5,minutes=30)

But it gives me an error.

TypeError: object of type 'datetime.time' has no len()

please help.

4 Answers 4

16

as of '0.25.3' this is as simple as

df[column] = df[column] + pd.Timedelta(hours=1)
8

You can try importing timedelta:

from datetime import datetime, timedelta

and then:

segments_data['time'] = pd.DatetimeIndex(segments_data['time']) + timedelta(hours=5,minutes=30)
4

Pandas does not support vectorised operations with datetime.time objects. For efficient, vectorised operations, there is no requirement to use the datetime module from the standard library.

You have a couple of options to vectorise your calculation. Either use a Pandas timedelta series, if your times represent a duration. Or use a Pandas datetime series, if your times represent specific points in time.

The choice depends entirely on what your data represents.

timedelta series

df['time'] = pd.to_timedelta(df['time'].astype(str)) + pd.to_timedelta('05:30:00')

print(df['time'].head())

0   10:20:00
1   10:20:00
2   10:30:00
3   10:42:00
4   11:34:00
Name: 1, dtype: timedelta64[ns]

datetime series

df['time'] = pd.to_datetime(df['time'].astype(str)) + pd.DateOffset(hours=5, minutes=30)

print(df['time'].head())

0   2018-12-24 10:20:00
1   2018-12-24 10:20:00
2   2018-12-24 10:30:00
3   2018-12-24 10:42:00
4   2018-12-24 11:34:00
Name: 1, dtype: datetime64[ns]

Notice by default the current date is assumed.

2
  • Interesting - how does this compare to the approach in this answer. Should we prefer pd.to_timedelta and co over pd.DatetimeIndex ? Apr 1, 2019 at 12:05
  • 1
    @Mr_and_Mrs_D, No time complexity difference. They should be roughly equivalent. In general, I reserve DatetimeIndex when I'm creating an index (since it's in the name), to_datetime when creating a series.
    – jpp
    Apr 1, 2019 at 15:57
2

This is a gnarly way of doing it, principally the problem here is the lack of vectorised support for time objects, so you first need to convert the time to datetime by using combine and then apply the offset and get the time component back:

In [28]:  
import datetime as dt  
df['new_time'] = df['time'].apply(lambda x: (dt.datetime.combine(dt.datetime(1,1,1), x,) + dt.timedelta(hours=3,minutes=30)).time())
df

Out[28]:
           time  new_time
index                    
0      04:50:00  08:20:00
1      04:50:00  08:20:00
2      05:00:00  08:30:00
3      05:12:00  08:42:00
4      06:04:00  09:34:00
5      06:44:00  10:14:00
6      06:44:00  10:14:00
7      06:47:00  10:17:00
8      06:47:00  10:17:00
9      06:47:00  10:17:00
2
  • How to select time greater than 10am in above?
    – Neil
    Jan 28, 2016 at 9:22
  • df[df['new_time'] > dt.time(10,0)] works for me or df[df.new_time.gt(dt.time(10))]
    – EdChum
    Jan 28, 2016 at 9:27

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