4

I have written the following method:

public T CreatePackage<T>() where T : new()
{
        var package = new T();

        if (typeof(ComponentInformationPackage) == typeof(T))
        {
            var compInfoPackage = package as ComponentInformationPackage;

            // ...

            return compInfoPackage;
        }

        throw new System.NotImplementedException();
}

I check what type T is and according to this I treat my variable Package. When I want to return it I get an compiler error.

"The type ComponentInformationPackage cannot be implicitly converted to T"

How can I solve this problem?

  • can you add code showing how you call Create Package? more interested in knowing what you pass as T while calling – Viru Jan 27 '16 at 9:42
  • I am guessing you may be voilating covariance rule – Viru Jan 27 '16 at 9:48
8

First: Where a cast doesn't work, a safe cast does work:

return CompInfoPackage as T;

...provided there's a class constraint on T:

public static T CreatePackage<T>() where T : class, new() { ... }

Second: Given this code:

var package = new T();
if (typeof(ComponentInformationPackage) == typeof(T))
{
    var compInfoPackage = package as ComponentInformationPackage;

    // ...

    return (T)compInfoPackage; 
}

...you already have the reference package to the new object. Since it's of type T, the compiler already likes it as a return type. Why not return that?

var package = new T();
if (typeof(ComponentInformationPackage) == typeof(T))
{
    var compInfoPackage = package as ComponentInformationPackage;

    // ...

    return package; // Same object as compInfoPackage
}
  • This is actually the best answer, since indeed package and compInfoPackage are different pointers to the same object in memory. – QuantumHive Jan 27 '16 at 11:51
  • The first is not true. The type parameter 'T' cannot be used with the 'as' operator because it does not have a class type constraint nor a 'class' constraint. – Ripple Jan 27 '16 at 12:33
  • Indeed; you need the class constraint on T, i.e., where T : class, new(). My bad to omit that. Another answer, which now appears to be gone, suggested casting via (T)(object) -- that also works, but again, only if T is a reference type. – Petter Hesselberg Jan 27 '16 at 13:57
  • @Ripple: Thanks for the catch; I've updated my answer. – Petter Hesselberg Jan 27 '16 at 13:59
3

You have to cast to T as your method returns an instance of T not ComponentInformationPackage.

return (T)CompInfoPackage;

The compiler has no chance to get to know that T actually IS a ComponentInformationPackage. However as you already checked it before this cast may never fail.

However I´m not sure why you have a generic type at all, as only instances of ComponentInformationPackage are handled by your method. Ommit the type-param and the constraint and simply return what you already do.

EDIT: I mentioned it already within the comments, you can also return package (without any cast) as the compiler already knows that package is an instance of T. Last opportunity you have is return (T)(object) CompInfoPackage which however seems quite odd to me.

  • In this case I get the error message that the type ComponentInformationPackage cannot be converted to T. – user32323 Jan 27 '16 at 9:32
  • Does ComponentInformationPackage have a parameterless constructor? – Justin Harvey Jan 27 '16 at 9:35
  • Yes, and there are more types which are handeled in this method, I just skipped it to make the example code more simple – user32323 Jan 27 '16 at 9:38
  • Did you try to cast it to Package before (or simply return (T) package)? – HimBromBeere Jan 27 '16 at 9:40
  • This does not even compile. – Petter Hesselberg Jan 27 '16 at 23:25
2

Casting back to T will not work as suggested by HimBromBeere and thus is not your solution. In order for the compiler to accept the cast you will need an additional type constraint of ComponentInformationPackage. So this will be your fix:

public T CreatePackage<T>()
    where T : ComponentInformationPackage, new()
{
        var package = new T();

        if (typeof(ComponentInformationPackage) == typeof(T))
        {
            var compInfoPackage = package as ComponentInformationPackage;

            // ...

            return (T)compInfoPackage;
        }

        throw new System.NotImplementedException();
}

Also I suggest using the capitalization conventions as a guideline by MSDN. This is irrelevant to your question, but it's a tip.

  • 1
    This will not handle multiple types which OP was trying – Viru Jan 27 '16 at 9:59
  • This will probably also not work as not every T IS such a ComponentInformationPackage. – HimBromBeere Jan 27 '16 at 10:00
  • OP is checking if T is a ComponentInformationPackage, if not he throws an exception. Concerning the code provided, it might be a better idea to put that constraint there. The if statement and the exception will also be redundant in that case. So the discussion remains whether OP actually needs to pass in other types than ComponentInformationPackage in the open generic type parameter. – QuantumHive Jan 27 '16 at 10:06
  • If you read the comments on HimBromBeere answer..OP stated it has skipped codes related to other types – Viru Jan 27 '16 at 10:10
  • @Viru in that case, the question remains what types OP wants to pass in to the open generic type parameters. Since that info is not provided in his question, I cannot do anything else than assuming what he wants outside the context in his question. Regarding the comment, that was made while I was typing my answer. – QuantumHive Jan 27 '16 at 10:16
2

If you want to handle the object creation based on the type you shouldn't use generics here (as it is NOT generic). Maybe use a factory pattern to achieve that.

  • Although not very much detail, I think this answer is probably the best from a design perspective. Just because you can use generics doesn't mean you should.. – Ric .Net Jan 28 '16 at 23:15
0

I think what you are trying to achieve is not possible with generics unless you have all your types implement common interface or is of some common abstract type

public T CreatePackage<T>()
    where T : IPackage, new()
{
        var package = new T();

        if (typeof(ComponentInformationPackage) == typeof(T))
        {
            var compInfoPackage = package as ComponentInformationPackage;

            // ...

            return (T)compInfoPackage;
        }

        throw new System.NotImplementedException();
}

In Above example, all your classes should implement IPackage interface

It seems like you want to create instance based on the type passed...you need something like factory pattern. I think you should reconsider your design

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