21

I have rows in an Oracle database table which should be unique for a combination of two fields but the unique constrain is not set up on the table so I need to find all rows which violate the constraint myself using SQL. Unfortunately my meager SQL skills aren't up to the task.

My table has three columns which are relevant: entity_id, station_id, and obs_year. For each row the combination of station_id and obs_year should be unique, and I want to find out if there are rows which violate this by flushing them out with an SQL query.

I have tried the following SQL (suggested by this previous question) but it doesn't work for me (I get ORA-00918 column ambiguously defined):

SELECT
entity_id, station_id, obs_year
FROM
mytable t1
INNER JOIN (
SELECT entity_id, station_id, obs_year FROM mytable 
GROUP BY entity_id, station_id, obs_year HAVING COUNT(*) > 1) dupes 
ON 
t1.station_id = dupes.station_id AND
t1.obs_year = dupes.obs_year

Can someone suggest what I'm doing wrong, and/or how to solve this?

40
SELECT  *
FROM    (
        SELECT  t.*, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY station_id, obs_year ORDER BY entity_id) AS rn
        FROM    mytable t
        )
WHERE   rn > 1
  • Thanks a lot for this response. Unfortunately when I run this I get an "ORA-00923: FROM keyword not found where expected" message. – James Adams Aug 17 '10 at 17:00
  • In mssql in had to put a as x (name doesn't really matter) behind the FROM ( ) paranthesis to make it work. Great answer! – Mafii Apr 6 '17 at 9:30
12
SELECT entity_id, station_id, obs_year
FROM mytable t1
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 from mytable t2 Where
       t1.station_id = t2.station_id
       AND t1.obs_year = t2.obs_year
       AND t1.RowId <> t2.RowId)
  • Looks like we cannot do this on a view: ORA-01445: cannot select ROWID from, or sample, a join view without a key-preserved table – Thyag Nov 17 '16 at 21:02
2

Change the 3 fields in the initial select to be

SELECT
t1.entity_id, t1.station_id, t1.obs_year
2

Re-write of your query

SELECT
t1.entity_id, t1.station_id, t1.obs_year
FROM
mytable t1
INNER JOIN (
SELECT entity_id, station_id, obs_year FROM mytable 
GROUP BY entity_id, station_id, obs_year HAVING COUNT(*) > 1) dupes 
ON 
t1.station_id = dupes.station_id AND
t1.obs_year = dupes.obs_year

I think the ambiguous column error (ORA-00918) was because you were selecting columns whose names appeared in both the table and the subquery, but you did not specifiy if you wanted it from dupes or from mytable (aliased as t1).

1

Could you not create a new table that includes the unique constraint, and then copy across the data row by row, ignoring failures?

  • Yes, this is a good idea, thanks! BTW I'm trying to figure out how to create the constraint on my table using annotations in my entity class (I'm a Java developer using JPA/Hibernate), see stackoverflow.com/questions/3504477/… – James Adams Aug 17 '10 at 16:45
1

You need to specify the table for the columns in the main select. Also, assuming entity_id is the unique key for mytable and is irrelevant to finding duplicates, you should not be grouping on it in the dupes subquery.

Try:

SELECT t1.entity_id, t1.station_id, t1.obs_year
FROM mytable t1
INNER JOIN (
SELECT station_id, obs_year FROM mytable 
GROUP BY station_id, obs_year HAVING COUNT(*) > 1) dupes 
ON 
t1.station_id = dupes.station_id AND
t1.obs_year = dupes.obs_year
  • Thanks, Mark, for the tip about not using entity_id in the grouping subquery, and for the illustrative example. – James Adams Aug 18 '10 at 14:16
0
SELECT  *
FROM    (
        SELECT  t.*, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY station_id, obs_year ORDER BY entity_id) AS rn
        FROM    mytable t
        )
WHERE   rn > 1

by Quassnoi is the most efficient for large tables. I had this analysis of cost :

SELECT a.dist_code, a.book_date, a.book_no
FROM trn_refil_book a
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 1 from trn_refil_book b Where
       a.dist_code = b.dist_code and a.book_date = b.book_date and a.book_no = b.book_no
       AND a.RowId <> b.RowId)
       ;

gave a cost of 1322341

SELECT a.dist_code, a.book_date, a.book_no
FROM trn_refil_book a
INNER JOIN (
SELECT b.dist_code, b.book_date, b.book_no FROM trn_refil_book b 
GROUP BY b.dist_code, b.book_date, b.book_no HAVING COUNT(*) > 1) c 
ON 
 a.dist_code = c.dist_code and a.book_date = c.book_date and a.book_no = c.book_no
;

gave a cost of 1271699

while

SELECT  dist_code, book_date, book_no
FROM    (
        SELECT  t.dist_code, t.book_date, t.book_no, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY t.book_date, t.book_no
          ORDER BY t.dist_code) AS rn
        FROM    trn_refil_book t
        ) p
WHERE   p.rn > 1
;

gave a cost of 1021984

The table was not indexed....

0
  SELECT entity_id, station_id, obs_year
    FROM mytable
GROUP BY entity_id, station_id, obs_year
HAVING COUNT(*) > 1

Specify the fields to find duplicates on both the SELECT and the GROUP BY.

It works by using GROUP BY to find any rows that match any other rows based on the specified Columns. The HAVING COUNT(*) > 1 says that we are only interested in seeing any rows that occur more than 1 time (and are therefore duplicates)

  • Hiya, this may well solve the problem... but it'd be good if you could provide a little explanation about how and why it works :) Don't forget - there are heaps of newbies on Stack overflow, and they could learn a thing or two from your expertise - what's obvious to you might not be so to them. – Taryn East Aug 7 '14 at 23:34
  • Thanks Taryn. It works by using GROUP BY to find any rows that match any other rows based on the specified Columns. The HAVING COUNT(*) > 1 says that we are only interested in seeing any rows that occur more than 1 time (and are therefore duplicates) – grokster Aug 27 '14 at 20:34
  • Hi, don't tell me (in the comments). I know SQL, I'm not asking for me... This sort of explanation is "part of your complete answer"... so please edit your answer and add it there. :) – Taryn East Aug 28 '14 at 0:01
  • Isn't this only part of the answer? I mean, you get to know which entity_id, station_id, obs_year tuples have duplicates, but you don't get the actual rows which are duplicated. – Daniel F Apr 12 '19 at 22:40
0

I thought a lot of the solutions here were cumbersome and tough to understand since I had a 3 column primary key constraint and needed to find the duplicates. So here's an option

SELECT id, name, value, COUNT(*) FROM db_name.table_name
GROUP BY id, name, value
HAVING COUNT(*) > 1

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