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At a Linux shell, you can do something like:

date -d "next Tuesday"

To get next Tuesday.

My issue is this: I want to get Tuesday of NEXT WEEK. So if I'm currently on Monday, I want it to go 7 days forward to next week, then evaluate "next Tuesday". Is there a way to chain the date evaluations somehow?

To further elaborate, if I am on a Wednesday, then next week's Tuesday is just 6 days away

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  • 1
    Add that as an edit to the question. Commented Jan 27, 2016 at 16:55
  • bash has no date command. When you run date, it's a separate operating system component, not part of bash. Commented Jan 27, 2016 at 17:38
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    That's important, because what you can do in date differs between operating systems even if they're all running bash: MacOS, for instance, has BSD date, which is much less capable than the GNU version common on Linux; the answers here all depend on GNU date (and don't depend at all on bash; they'll work fine with ksh or ash or calling date straight from Python or Java or C with no shell at all). Commented Jan 27, 2016 at 17:38

2 Answers 2

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date is cleverer than you'd think

~: date -d "next tuesday"
Tue Feb  2 00:00:00 GMT 2016
~: date -d "1 week next tuesday"
Tue Feb  9 00:00:00 GMT 2016
~: 

If you want to get the Tuesday of next week you can find the start of next week, then add a day

~: date -d "1 day next monday"
Tue Feb  2 00:00:00 GMT 2016

If you want it to be slightly clear you can use

~: date -d "next Monday + 1 day"
Tue Feb  2 00:00:00 GMT 2016

Based on Charles Duffy's comments it might be worth noting on my machine

~: date --version #on RHEL6
date (GNU coreutils) 8.4
<license stuff (GPLv3)>
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  • Why is the time different? Commented Jan 27, 2016 at 16:56
  • @MadPhysicist I think it's reading the a as a time format -- fixed
    – Holloway
    Commented Jan 27, 2016 at 16:57
  • The problem with this is you need to know ahead of time if today is before or after Tuesday.
    – chepner
    Commented Jan 27, 2016 at 17:12
  • @chepner, not sure if that was what the OP was after but if you wanted you could do date -d "1 day next monday" to ensure you get the Tuesday of next week
    – Holloway
    Commented Jan 27, 2016 at 17:15
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    @chepner: No, it isn't "getting the next monday after (today + 1 day)" since that would BE a Monday.
    – Ben Voigt
    Commented Jan 27, 2016 at 17:30
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The only way to do this reliably is to first get the next "beginning of week day" (which might vary from region to region; for this I'll assume it's Sunday), then request a day 0-6 days in the future, where 0 through 6 stand in for Sunday through Saturday, respectively.

$ bow=$(date -d "next Sunday")
$ date -d "$bow + 0 days"

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