5

I have an excel file with multiple UserForms. To open a UserForm I have code such as

Sub runAdjuster()
   Adjuster.Show
End Sub

There are about 5 of these. What is considered best practice in terms of where this code should be kept? I originally had it in a module, but have decided to move it to the ThisWorkbook object. Looking for tips on what is normally done to keep code clean.

12

Assuming Adjuster is the name of the form, you're using the default instance here, which isn't ideal.

This would already be better:

Dim view As Adjuster
Set view = New Adjuster
view.Show

Yes, it's more code. But you're using a dedicated object (i.e. view) and, if that object's state gets modified, these changes aren't going to affect the default instance. Think of that default instance as a global object: it's global, which isn't very OOP.

Now, you may argue, why not "new up" the object on the same line as the declaration then?

Consider this:

Sub DoSomething()
    Dim c As New Collection
    Set c = Nothing
    c.Add "test"
End Sub

Is this code accessing a null reference and blowing up with a run-time error 91? No! Confusing? Yes! Hence, avoid the As New shortcut, unless you like having VBA automagically doing implicit stuff behind your back.


So, you're asking about best practice... I tend to consider VBA UserForms as an early pre-.NET version of , and best practice design pattern for WinForms is the Model-View-Presenter pattern (aka "MVP").

Following this pattern, you'll have UserForms strictly responsible for presentation, and you'll have your business logic either implemented in a presenter object, or in a dedicated object that the presenter uses. Something like this:

Class Module: MyPresenter

The presenter class receives events from the model, and executes application logic depending on the state of the model. It knows about a concept of a view, but it doesn't have to be tightly coupled with a concrete implementation (e.g. MyUserForm) - with proper tooling you could write unit tests to validate your logic programmatically, without having to actually run the code and display the form and click everywhere.

Option Explicit

Private Type TPresenter
    View As IView
End type

Public Enum PresenterError
    ERR_ModelNotSet = vbObjectError + 42
End Enum

Private WithEvents viewModel As MyModel
Private this As TPresenter

Public Sub Show()
    If viewModel Is Nothing Then
        Err.Raise ERR_ModelNotSet, "MyPresenter.Show", "Model is not set to an object reference."
    End If
    'todo: set up model properties
    view.Show
    If Not view.IsCancelled Then DoSomething
End Sub

Public Property Get View() As IView
    Set View = this.View
End Property

Public Property Set View(ByVal value As IView)
    Set this.View = value
    If Not this.View Is Nothing Then Set this.View.Model = viewModel
End Property

Public Property Get Model() As MyModel
    Set Model = viewModel
End Property

Public Property Set Model(ByVal value As MyModel)
    Set viewModel = value
    If Not this.View Is Nothing Then Set this.View.Model = viewModel        
End Property

Private Sub Class_Terminate()
    Set this.View.Model = Nothing
    Set this.View = Nothing
    Set viewModel = Nothing
End Sub

Private Sub viewModel_PropertyChanged(ByVal changedProperty As ModelProperties)
    'todo: execute logic that needs to run when something changes in the form
End Sub

Private Sub DoSomething()
    'todo: whatever needs to happen after the form closes
End Sub

Class Module: IView

That's the abstraction that represents the concept of a View that exposes everything the Presenter needs to know about any UserForm - note that everything it needs to know, isn't much:

Option Explicit

Public Property Get Model() As Object
End Property

Public Property Set Model(ByVal value As Object)
End Property

Public Property Get IsCancelled() As Boolean
End Property

Public Sub Show()
End Sub

Class Module: MyModel

The model class encapsulates the data that the form needs and manipulates. It doesn't know about the view, and it doesn't know about the presenter either: it's just a container for encapsulated data, with simple logic that enables both the view and the presenter to execute code when any of the properties are modified.

Option Explicit

Private Type TModel
    MyProperty As String
    SomeOtherProperty As String
    'todo: wrap members here
End Type

Public Enum ModelProperties
    MyProperty
    SomeOtherProperty
    'todo: add enum values here for each monitored property
End Enum

Public Event PropertyChanged(ByVal changedProperty As ModelProperties)
Private this As TModel

Public Property Get MyProperty() As String
    MyProperty = this.MyProperty
End Property

Public Property Let MyProperty(ByVal value As String)
    If this.MyProperty <> value Then
        this.MyProperty = value
        RaiseEvent PropertyChanged(MyProperty)
    End If
End Property

Public Property Get SomeOtherProperty() As String
    SomeProperty = this.SomeOtherProperty
End Property

Public Property Let SomeOtherProperty(ByVal value As String)
    If this.SomeOtherProperty <> value Then
        this.SomeOtherProperty = value
        RaiseEvent PropertyChanged(SomeOtherProperty)
    End If
End Property

'todo: expose other model properties

UserForm: MyUserForm

The UserForm is strictly responsible for visual presentation; all its event handlers to, is change the value of a property in the model - the model then tells the presenter "hey I've been modified!", and the presenter acts accordingly. The form also listens for modified properties on the model, so when the presenter changes the model, the view can execute code and update itself accordingly. Here's an example of a simple form "binding" the MyProperty model property to the text of some TextBox1; I added a listener for SomeOtherProperty just to illustrate that the view can also be updated indirectly when the model changes.

Obviously the view wouldn't be reacting to the same properties changing as the presenter, otherwise you would enter an endless ping-pong of callbacks that would eventually blow up the stack... but you get the idea.

Note that the form implements the IView interface, so that the presenter can talk to it without actually knowing about its inner workings. The interface implementation simply refers to concrete members, but the concrete members don't even need to actually exist, since they won't even be used!

Option Explicit
Implements IView

Private Type TView
    IsCancelled As Boolean
End Type

Private WithEvents viewModel As MyModel
Private this As TView

Private Property Get IView_Model() As Object
    Set IView_Model = Model
End Property

Private Property Set IView_Model(ByVal value As Object)
    Set Model = value
End Property

Private Property Get IView_IsCancelled() As Boolean
    IView_IsCancelled = IsCancelled
End Property

Private Sub IView_Show()
    Show vbModal
End Sub

Public Property Get Model() As MyModel
    Set Model = viewModel
End Property

Public Property Set Model(ByVal value As MyModel)
    Set viewModel = value
End Property

Public Property Get IsCancelled() As Boolean
    IsCancelled = this.IsCancelled
End Property

Private Sub CancelButton_Click()
    this.IsCancelled = True
    Me.Hide
End Sub

Private Sub OkButton_Click()
    Me.Hide
End Sub

Private Sub UserForm_QueryClose(Cancel As Integer, CloseMode As Integer)
    '"x-ing out" of the form is like clicking the Cancel button
    If CloseMode = VbQueryClose.vbFormControlMenu Then
        this.IsCancelled = True
    End If
End Sub

Private Sub UserForm_Activate()
    If viewModel Is Nothing Then
        MsgBox "Model property must be assigned before the view can be displayed.", vbCritical, "Error"
        Unload Me
    Else
        Me.TextBox1.Text = viewModel.MyProperty
        Me.TextBox1.SetFocus
    End If
End Sub

Private Sub TextBox1_Change()
    'UI elements update the model properties
    viewModel.MyProperty = Me.TextBox1.Text
End Sub

Private Sub viewModel_PropertyChanged(ByVal changedProperty As ModelProperties)
    If changedProperty = SomeOtherProperty Then
        Frame1.Caption = SomeOtherProperty
    End If
End Sub

Module: Macros

Say your spreadsheet had a shape and you wanted to run that logic when it's clicked. You need to attach a macro to that shape - I like to regroup all macros in a standard module (.bas) called "Macros", that contains nothing but public procedures that all look like this:

Option Explicit

Public Sub DoSomething()

    Dim presenter As MyPresenter 
    Set presenter = New MyPresenter

    Dim theModel As MyModel
    Set theModel = New MyModel

    Dim theView As IView
    Set theView = New MyUserForm

    Set presenter.Model = theModel
    Set presenter.View = theView
    presenter.Show

End Sub

Now, if you want to test your presenter logic programmatically without showing a form, all you need to do is implement a "fake" view, and write a test method that will do what you need:

Class: MyFakeView

Option Explicit
Implements IView

Private Type TFakeView
    IsCancelled As Boolean
End Type

Private this As TFakeView

Private Property Get IView_Model() As Object
    Set IView_Model = Model
End Property

Private Property Set IView_Model(ByVal value As Object)
    Set Model = value
End Property

Private Property Get IView_IsCancelled() As Boolean
    IView_IsCancelled = IsCancelled
End Property

Private Sub IView_Show()
    IsCancelled = False
End Sub

Public Property Get IsCancelled() As Boolean
    IsCancelled = this.IsCancelled
End Property

Public Property Let IsCancelled(ByVal value As Boolean)
    this.IsCancelled = value
End Property

Module: TestModule1

There are probably other tools out there, but since I actually wrote this one and I like how it works without a crap ton of boilerplate setup code or comments that contain executable instructions I'm going to warmly recommend using Rubberduck unit tests. Here's what a [very simple] test module might look like:

'@TestModule
Option Explicit
Option Private Module
Private Assert As New Rubberduck.AssertClass

'@TestMethod
Public Sub Model_SomePropertyInitializesEmpty()
    On Error GoTo TestFail

    'Arrange
    Dim presenter As MyPresenter 
    Set presenter = New MyPresenter

    Dim theModel As MyModel
    Set theModel = New MyModel

    Set presenter.Model = theModel
    Set presenter.View = New MyFakeView

    'Act
    presenter.Show

    'Assert
    Assert.IsTrue theModel.SomeProperty = vbNullString

TestExit:
    Exit Sub
TestFail:
    Assert.Fail "Test raised an error: #" & Err.Number & " - " & Err.Description
End Sub

Rubberduck unit tests allow you to use this decoupled code to test everything you want to test about your application logic - as long as you keep that application logic decoupled and that you write testable code, you'll have unit tests that document how your VBA application is supposed to behave, tests that document what the specs are - just like you would have them in C# or Java, or any other OOP language one can write unit tests with.

Point is, VBA can do it, too.


Overkill? Depends. Specs changes all the time, code changes accordingly. Implementing all the application logic in spreadsheets' code-behind gets utterly annoying, because the Project Explorer doesn't drill down to module members, so finding what's implemented where can easily get annoying.

And it's even worse when the logic is implemented in the forms' code-behind and then you have Button_Click handlers making database calls or spreadsheet manipulations.

Code that's implemented in objects that have as few responsibilities as possible, makes code that's reusable, and that's easier to maintain.

Your question isn't exactly precise about exactly what you mean with "an Excel file with multiple userforms", but if you need to, you could have a "main" presenter class that receives 4-5 "child" presenters, each being responsible for the specific logic tied to each "child" form.

That said, if you have working code (that works exactly as intended) that you would like to refactor and make more efficient, or easier to read/maintain, you can post it on Code Review Stack Exchange, that's what that site is for.


Disclaimer: I maintain the Rubberduck project.

0

It depends on what launches these subs. If they are attached to a button or shape (which is what I tend to do for launching userforms) then it makes sense to put them in the module for the sheet that contains the shape. If buttons/shapes on several sheets refer to it -- put them in a general code module. I don't know if there really is a "best practice" here. The most important thing is to have consistency so that you don't have to go searching for things.

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