4

For example, if I have:

.example1 {
  color: #646464;
}

.example2 {
  color: #646464;
}

After the processing is done, the code would look like:

.example1,
.example2 {
  color: #646464;
}

Because the designs I work with, I often find myself using the same declaration on many many rules (from different pages, etc. so I can't group them together on the spot) and I would like to know if something like this helps speed up the rendering in any way or if it has any benefits.

2
  • 1
    The advantage of doing this is likely to be miniscule. After minifying and zipping the difference in payload size is not likely to be worth the trouble. I doubt if the preprocessing would have any effect whatsoever on actual CSS performance.
    – user663031
    Jan 27 '16 at 18:15
  • Instead, you may want to consider how you write your CSS and HTML. More and more people are using "microclasses", where you would write .dark-gray { color: #646464; }, then write that class in your HTML.
    – user663031
    Jan 27 '16 at 18:57
1

You can use for that csso with option restructuring: true, but it is more postprocessing than preprocessing :)

.example1 {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background: red;
}
.example2 {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background: blue;
}

Output will be

.example1, .example2 {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background: red;
}
.example2 {
  background: blue;
}
1
  • Cool! I see there's a Grunt plugin for that too: npmjs.com/package/grunt-csso, I think I'll use this from now on, it'll save a few lines for sure!
    – serge
    Jan 27 '16 at 18:25
0

You can do this with SCSS and placeholders:

%example {
  color: #646464;
}

.example1 {
  @extend %example;
}

.example2 {
  @extend %example;
}

Results in:

.example1,
.example2 {
  color: #646464;
}

Note, misuse of the @extend functionality can lead to bloated code, and sometimes extending like this can actually do more harm than good. Harry Roberts has a good writeup on this.

Why placeholders specifically? (edit)

I didn't mention the fact that you could technically just have .example1 with the base styling and have it extended by .example2:

.example1 {
  color: #646464;
}

.example2 {
  @extend .example1;
}

The reason for this is that in my experience this leads to all sort of headache down the road. It's easy to forget what's extending what and thoughlessly tweak with unexpected results. For example:

.example1 {
  color: #646464;
}

.example2 {
  @extend .example1; //cool, example2 now has color #646464
}

//now I just want to change the example1 color for some reason
@media ( min-width: 640px ) {
  .example1 {
    color: pink; //<-- uh oh 
  }
}

You now have the following:

.example1,
.example2 {
  color: #646464;
}

@media ( min-width: 640px ) {
  .example1,
  .example2 {
    color: pink;
  }
}

Because @extend will apply across all instances of the extended selector. This is often unwanted behaviour, and can be painful to debug. A placeholder can be declared once and overridden as needed.

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