4

I have a Producer and a Consumer. Producer writes messages synchronously. The consumer is a thread that polls for messages every second.

I have a test like this:

@Test
public void shouldConsumeMessageWhenMessageIsProduced() {
    final Message expectedMessage = new Message("test");
    //consumer will poll every 1 second for a message
    consumer.poll((actualMessage) -> {assertThat(actualMessage), is(expectedMessage));
    producer.sendSynchronously(expectedMessage);
    Thread.sleep(3000);      
}

This test works. However, there is no way for me to ensure that the assertion was actually invoked.

I realize that I could use Mockito, but I also realize that this is more of an integration test than a unit test. But is there anyway in JUnit to ensure that all the assertions have been executed?

Please note since the assertion is in a lambda, I cannot increment a variable or set a flag.

  • It's been a while, but if I remember correctly - It's best practice to only have one assertion per test. You might want to try and re-work the tests so that you are only testing one thing at a time. If you're expecting a collection to be returned, then compare that collection to a test collection, not the individual members of the collection. – Frank Jan 27 '16 at 19:19
  • You can create a List with single Integer element, and use it as counter. Since the List will be effectively final, you can use it inside lambda. – Mrinal Jan 27 '16 at 19:28
  • You probably could use Mockito to mock the "poll" – user180100 Jan 27 '16 at 20:22
2

It seems that you want your test to wait until the assertion is triggered, probably with a time out. A CountDownLatch could do the job:

@Test
public void shouldConsumeMessageWhenMessageIsProduced() {
    final Message expectedMessage = new Message("test");

    CountDownLatch messageReceived = new CountDownLatch(1);

    //consumer will poll every 1 second for a message
    consumer.poll(actualMessage -> {
      assertThat(actualMessage, is(expectedMessage));
      messageReceived.countDown();
    }

    producer.sendSynchronously(expectedMessage);

    //wait until the message is received, but not more than one second
    //await returns false if it reaches the timeout
    assertTrue(messageReceived.await(1, SECONDS));
}

If you expect the assertion in the consumer to be triggered n times, you can change the initial count of the latch: CountDownLatch latch = new CountDownLatch(n);.

3

I would make use either AtomicBoolean or MutableBoolean from your lambda expression depending on your preference. See the following code for an example:

import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicBoolean;
import org.apache.commons.lang.mutable.MutableBoolean;
import org.junit.Test;

public class AssertionLambdaTest {
    @Test
    public void assertExecutedWithAtomicBoolean() {
        AtomicBoolean myBoolean = new AtomicBoolean(false);
        doStuff(() -> {
            assertTrue(true);
            myBoolean.set(true);
        });
        assertTrue(myBoolean.get());
    }

    @Test
    public void assertExecutedWithMutableBoolean() {
        MutableBoolean myBoolean = new MutableBoolean(false);
        doStuff(() -> {
            assertTrue(true);
            myBoolean.setValue(true);
        });
        assertTrue(myBoolean.booleanValue());
    }

    private void doStuff(Runnable runner) {
        runner.run();
    }
}

Edit: I just realized that your question said "all assertions". As such, you could equivalently use Apache's MutableInt class or Java's AtomicInteger in the same way, just incrementing until the correct number has been reached.

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