198

I'm experimenting with this code-first approach, but I'm find out now that a property of type System.Decimal gets mapped to a sql column of type decimal(18, 0).

How do I set the precision of the database column?

  • one way is to use [Column(TypeName = "decimal(18,4)")] attribute for your decimal properties – S.Serpooshan Dec 9 '18 at 7:04

15 Answers 15

225

The answer from Dave Van den Eynde is now out of date. There are 2 important changes, from EF 4.1 onwards the ModelBuilder class is now DbModelBuilder and there is now a DecimalPropertyConfiguration.HasPrecision Method which has a signature of:

public DecimalPropertyConfiguration HasPrecision(
byte precision,
byte scale )

where precision is the total number of digits the db will store, regardless of where the decimal point falls and scale is the number of decimal places it will store.

Therefore there is no need to iterate through properties as shown but the can just be called from

public class EFDbContext : DbContext
{
   protected override void OnModelCreating(System.Data.Entity.DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
   {
       modelBuilder.Entity<Class>().Property(object => object.property).HasPrecision(12, 10);

       base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
   }
}
  • For anyone that is getting issues with the DbModelBuilder, try System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.ModelBuilder modelBuilder – ThePower Nov 15 '11 at 12:11
  • 1
    I noticed you never called base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);. Was that intentional or just a victim of typing code online instead of in an IDE? – BenSwayne Aug 1 '12 at 23:31
  • 1
    @BenSwayne thanks for the spot, this is my omission, not anything intentional. I will edit the answer. – AlexC Aug 2 '12 at 7:56
  • 22
    The 2 arguments to HasPrecision(precision, scale) are poorly documented. precision is the total number of digits it will store, regardless of where the decimal point falls. scale is the number of decimal places it will store. – Chris Moschini Aug 18 '12 at 21:29
  • 1
    Is there a EF configuration to set it for all decimal properties on all entities in one place? We generally use (19,4) . It would be nice to have this automatically be applied to all decimal properties, so we can't forget to set a property precision and miss anticipated precision in calculations. – Mike de Klerk Nov 16 '16 at 8:00
74

If you want to set the precision for all decimals in EF6 you could replace the default DecimalPropertyConvention convention used in the DbModelBuilder:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<DecimalPropertyConvention>();
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Add(new DecimalPropertyConvention(38, 18));
}

The default DecimalPropertyConvention in EF6 maps decimal properties to decimal(18,2) columns.

If you only want individual properties to have a specified precision then you can set the precision for the entity's property on the DbModelBuilder:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<MyEntity>().Property(e => e.Value).HasPrecision(38, 18);
}

Or, add an EntityTypeConfiguration<> for the entity which specifies the precision:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Configurations.Add(new MyEntityConfiguration());
}

internal class MyEntityConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<MyEntity>
{
    internal MyEntityConfiguration()
    {
        this.Property(e => e.Value).HasPrecision(38, 18);
    }
}
  • 1
    My favorite solution. Works perfect when using CodeFirst and migrations: EF looks for all properties in all classes where "decimal" is used and generates a migration for these properties. Great! – okieh Apr 17 '15 at 8:33
69

I had a nice time creating an Custom Attribute for this:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, Inherited = false, AllowMultiple = false)]
public sealed class DecimalPrecisionAttribute : Attribute
{
    public DecimalPrecisionAttribute(byte precision, byte scale)
    {
        Precision = precision;
        Scale = scale;

    }

    public byte Precision { get; set; }
    public byte Scale { get; set; }

}

using it like this

[DecimalPrecision(20,10)]
public Nullable<decimal> DeliveryPrice { get; set; }

and the magic happens at model creation with some reflection

protected override void OnModelCreating(System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    foreach (Type classType in from t in Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof(DecimalPrecisionAttribute)).GetTypes()
                                   where t.IsClass && t.Namespace == "YOURMODELNAMESPACE"
                                   select t)
     {
         foreach (var propAttr in classType.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance).Where(p => p.GetCustomAttribute<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>() != null).Select(
                p => new { prop = p, attr = p.GetCustomAttribute<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>(true) }))
         {

             var entityConfig = modelBuilder.GetType().GetMethod("Entity").MakeGenericMethod(classType).Invoke(modelBuilder, null);
             ParameterExpression param = ParameterExpression.Parameter(classType, "c");
             Expression property = Expression.Property(param, propAttr.prop.Name);
             LambdaExpression lambdaExpression = Expression.Lambda(property, true,
                                                                      new ParameterExpression[]
                                                                          {param});
             DecimalPropertyConfiguration decimalConfig;
             if (propAttr.prop.PropertyType.IsGenericType && propAttr.prop.PropertyType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
             {
                 MethodInfo methodInfo = entityConfig.GetType().GetMethods().Where(p => p.Name == "Property").ToList()[7];
                 decimalConfig = methodInfo.Invoke(entityConfig, new[] { lambdaExpression }) as DecimalPropertyConfiguration;
             }
             else
             {
                 MethodInfo methodInfo = entityConfig.GetType().GetMethods().Where(p => p.Name == "Property").ToList()[6];
                 decimalConfig = methodInfo.Invoke(entityConfig, new[] { lambdaExpression }) as DecimalPropertyConfiguration;
             }

             decimalConfig.HasPrecision(propAttr.attr.Precision, propAttr.attr.Scale);
        }
    }
}

the first part is to get all classes in the model (my custom attribute is defined in that assembly so i used that to get the assembly with the model)

the second foreach gets all properties in that class with the custom attribute, and the attribute itself so i can get the precision and scale data

after that i have to call

modelBuilder.Entity<MODEL_CLASS>().Property(c=> c.PROPERTY_NAME).HasPrecision(PRECISION,SCALE);

so i call the modelBuilder.Entity() by reflection and store it in the entityConfig variable then i build the "c => c.PROPERTY_NAME" lambda expression

After that, if the decimal is nullable i call the

Property(Expression<Func<TStructuralType, decimal?>> propertyExpression) 

method (i call this by the position in the array, it's not ideal i know, any help will be much appreciated)

and if it's not nullable i call the

Property(Expression<Func<TStructuralType, decimal>> propertyExpression)

method.

Having the DecimalPropertyConfiguration i call the HasPrecision method.

  • 3
    Thanks for this. It saved me from generating thousands of lambda expressions. – Sean Jul 5 '13 at 13:58
  • 1
    This works great, and is super clean! For EF 5, I changed System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.ModelBuilder to System.Data.Entity.DbModelBuilder – Colin Aug 31 '13 at 3:07
  • 2
    i use MethodInfo methodInfo = entityConfig.GetType().GetMethod("Property", new[] { lambdaExpression.GetType() }); to get the correct overload. seems to work so far. – fscan Feb 7 '14 at 18:53
  • 3
    I've wrapped this up into a library and made it easier to call from the DbContext: github.com/richardlawley/EntityFrameworkAttributeConfig (also available via nuget) – Richard Mar 24 '14 at 21:33
  • Richard, I love the idea of your project but is there anything about it that requires EF6? I would use it if there was an EF5-compatible version, so that I can use it with my version of ODP.NET. – Patrick Szalapski Nov 11 '14 at 18:56
47

Apparently, you can override the DbContext.OnModelCreating() method and configure the precision like this:

protected override void OnModelCreating(System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Property(product => product.Price).Precision = 10;
    modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Property(product => product.Price).Scale = 2;
}

But this is pretty tedious code when you have to do it with all your price-related properties, so I came up with this:

    protected override void OnModelCreating(System.Data.Entity.ModelConfiguration.ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        var properties = new[]
        {
            modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Property(product => product.Price),
            modelBuilder.Entity<Order>().Property(order => order.OrderTotal),
            modelBuilder.Entity<OrderDetail>().Property(detail => detail.Total),
            modelBuilder.Entity<Option>().Property(option => option.Price)
        };

        properties.ToList().ForEach(property =>
        {
            property.Precision = 10;
            property.Scale = 2;
        });

        base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
    }

It's good practice that you call the base method when you override a method, even though the base implementation does nothing.

Update: This article was also very helpful.

  • 10
    Thanks, this pointed me in the right direction. In CTP5 the syntax has changed to allow adding Precision and Scale in the same statement : modelBuilder.Entity<Product>().Property(product => product.Price).HasPrecision(6, 2); – Col Jan 12 '11 at 8:56
  • 2
    Still, wouldn't it be nice to have some sort of "default" you could set for all decimals? – Dave Van den Eynde Jun 10 '11 at 6:55
  • 3
    I don't think calling base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder); is necessary. From the DbContext metadata in VS: The default implementation of this method does nothing, but it can be overridden in a derived class such that the model can be further configured before it is locked down. – Matt Jenkins Jul 24 '11 at 8:05
  • @Matt: That's nice, but as an implementor I shouldn't care about this and always call the base. – Dave Van den Eynde Jul 25 '11 at 6:53
  • @ Dave and @Matt: There was a comment it was "IMPORTANT" to call base. It is good practice, but when the EF source has an empty implementation , it is misleading to claim it is Important. That leaves people wondering what the base does. I was so curious what was IMPORTANT i decompiled to the ef5.0 to check. Nothing there. So just a good habit. – phil soady Mar 1 '13 at 3:57
46

Using the DecimalPrecisonAttribute from KinSlayerUY, in EF6 you can create a convention which will handle individual properties which have the attribute (as opposed to setting the DecimalPropertyConvention like in this answer which will affect all decimal properties).

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, Inherited = false, AllowMultiple = false)]
public sealed class DecimalPrecisionAttribute : Attribute
{
    public DecimalPrecisionAttribute(byte precision, byte scale)
    {
        Precision = precision;
        Scale = scale;
    }
    public byte Precision { get; set; }
    public byte Scale { get; set; }
}

public class DecimalPrecisionAttributeConvention
    : PrimitivePropertyAttributeConfigurationConvention<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>
{
    public override void Apply(ConventionPrimitivePropertyConfiguration configuration, DecimalPrecisionAttribute attribute)
    {
        if (attribute.Precision < 1 || attribute.Precision > 38)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Precision must be between 1 and 38.");
        }

        if (attribute.Scale > attribute.Precision)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Scale must be between 0 and the Precision value.");
        }

        configuration.HasPrecision(attribute.Precision, attribute.Scale);
    }
}

Then in your DbContext:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Add(new DecimalPrecisionAttributeConvention());
}
  • @MichaelEdenfield Actually no there isn't one of these in EF6. Hence why I added two answers, this one and the other one you referred to. This is an attribute you can put on a single decimal property rather than affecting all decimal properties in the model. – kjbartel Jul 14 '14 at 0:04
  • 1
    If you are going to bounds-check Precision, then I recommend setting the upper bound to 28 (so > 28 in your condition). According to MSDN documentation, System.Decimal can only represent a maximum of 28-29 digits of precision (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/364x0z75.aspx). Also, the attribute declares Scale as byte, which means your precondition attribute.Scale < 0 is unnecessary. – NathanAldenSr Feb 26 '15 at 22:48
  • 2
    @kjbartel It is true that some database providers support precisions larger than 28; however, according to MSDN, System.Decimal does not. Therefore it makes no sense to set the upper bound precondition to anything larger than 28; System.Decimal can't represent numbers that large, apparently. Also, be aware that this attribute is useful for data providers other than SQL Server. For example, PostgreSQL's numeric type supports up to 131072 digits of precision. – NathanAldenSr Feb 27 '15 at 15:29
  • 1
    @NathanAldenSr Like I said, databases use a fixed point decimal (msdn) whereas System.Decimal is floating point. They are completely different. For example having a decimal(38,9) column will happy hold the System.Decimal.MaxValue but a decimal(28,9) column will not. There is no reason to limit the precision to only 28. – kjbartel Feb 28 '15 at 9:40
  • 1
    By far the cleanest solution. – Eli Arbel May 11 '16 at 4:46
30

Entity Framework Ver 6 (Alpha, rc1) has something called Custom Conventions. To set decimal precision:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    modelBuilder.Properties<decimal>().Configure(config => config.HasPrecision(18, 4));
}

Reference:

12

this code line could be a simpler way to acomplish the same:

 public class ProductConfiguration : EntityTypeConfiguration<Product>
    {
        public ProductConfiguration()
        {
            this.Property(m => m.Price).HasPrecision(10, 2);
        }
    }
  • This is in EF6 only, right? – Patrick Szalapski Nov 11 '14 at 19:03
  • 1
    This works since EF 4.1 – armadillo.mx Nov 14 '14 at 3:40
  • This was what I was looking for thanks, sometimes cleaner than the other answers. – TinyTimZamboni Sep 21 '16 at 22:05
8
[Column(TypeName = "decimal(18,2)")]

this will work with code first migrations as described here.

4

- FOR EF CORE - with using System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;

use [Column(TypeName = "decimal(precision, scale)")]

Precision = Total number of characters used

Scale = Total number after the dot. (easy to get confused)

Example:

public class Blog
{
    public int BlogId { get; set; }
    [Column(TypeName = "varchar(200)")]
    public string Url { get; set; }
    [Column(TypeName = "decimal(5, 2)")]
    public decimal Rating { get; set; }
}

More details here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/ef/core/modeling/relational/data-types

3

In EF6

modelBuilder.Properties()
    .Where(x => x.GetCustomAttributes(false).OfType<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>().Any())
    .Configure(c => {
        var attr = (DecimalPrecisionAttribute)c.ClrPropertyInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (DecimalPrecisionAttribute), true).FirstOrDefault();

        c.HasPrecision(attr.Precision, attr.Scale);
    });
  • This answer seems to be an upgrade to another answer that defines the attribute, you should edit this into that answer – Rhys Bevilaqua Oct 5 '16 at 1:44
2

You can always tell EF to do this with conventions in the Context class in the OnModelCreating function as follows:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
{
    // <... other configurations ...>
    // modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();
    // modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<ManyToManyCascadeDeleteConvention>();
    // modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<OneToManyCascadeDeleteConvention>();

    // Configure Decimal to always have a precision of 18 and a scale of 4
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<DecimalPropertyConvention>();
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Add(new DecimalPropertyConvention(18, 4));

    base.OnModelCreating(modelBuilder);
}

This only applies to Code First EF fyi and applies to all decimal types mapped to the db.

  • It was not working until Remove<DecimalPropertyConvention>(); comes before the Add(new DecimalPropertyConvention(18, 4));. I think it is strange that is not just overridden automatically. – Mike de Klerk Nov 16 '16 at 11:01
1

You can found more information on MSDN - facet of Entity Data Model. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee382834.aspx Full recommended.

  • That's great and all, but how does that relate to Code-First? – Dave Van den Eynde Jun 10 '11 at 6:57
  • It is useful but I can't specify a [Precision] attribute for a Decimal, still. So I used the solution provided by @KinSlayerUY. – Colin Aug 31 '13 at 3:15
1

Using

System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations;

You can simply put that attribute in your model :

[DataType("decimal(18,5)")]
  • 1
    this is the easiest implementation for readability and simplicity. IMHO – ransems Mar 21 '18 at 17:30
  • 9
    Per msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj591583(v=vs.113).aspx, this answer is factually incorrect. "Don’t confuse Column’s TypeName attribute with the DataType DataAnnotation. DataType is an annotation used for the UI and is ignored by Code First." – speckledcarp May 23 '18 at 18:58
  • 1
    @ransems I thought so too, until I just tested it and as was said above, this does not work for CodeFirst and does not migrate to the database – RoLYroLLs Jul 9 '18 at 18:20
0

KinSlayerUY's custom attribute worked nicely for me but I had issues with ComplexTypes. They were being mapped as entities in the attribute code so couldn't then be mapped as a ComplexType.

I therefore extended the code to allow for this:

public static void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        foreach (Type classType in from t in Assembly.GetAssembly(typeof(DecimalPrecisionAttribute)).GetTypes()
                                   where t.IsClass && t.Namespace == "FA.f1rstval.Data"
                                   select t)
        {
            foreach (var propAttr in classType.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance).Where(p => p.GetCustomAttribute<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>() != null).Select(
                   p => new { prop = p, attr = p.GetCustomAttribute<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>(true) }))
            {

                ParameterExpression param = ParameterExpression.Parameter(classType, "c");
                Expression property = Expression.Property(param, propAttr.prop.Name);
                LambdaExpression lambdaExpression = Expression.Lambda(property, true,
                                                                         new ParameterExpression[] { param });
                DecimalPropertyConfiguration decimalConfig;
                int MethodNum;
                if (propAttr.prop.PropertyType.IsGenericType && propAttr.prop.PropertyType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
                {
                    MethodNum = 7;
                }
                else
                {
                    MethodNum = 6;
                }

                //check if complextype
                if (classType.GetCustomAttribute<ComplexTypeAttribute>() != null)
                {
                    var complexConfig = modelBuilder.GetType().GetMethod("ComplexType").MakeGenericMethod(classType).Invoke(modelBuilder, null);
                    MethodInfo methodInfo = complexConfig.GetType().GetMethods().Where(p => p.Name == "Property").ToList()[MethodNum];
                    decimalConfig = methodInfo.Invoke(complexConfig, new[] { lambdaExpression }) as DecimalPropertyConfiguration;
                }
                else
                {
                    var entityConfig = modelBuilder.GetType().GetMethod("Entity").MakeGenericMethod(classType).Invoke(modelBuilder, null);
                    MethodInfo methodInfo = entityConfig.GetType().GetMethods().Where(p => p.Name == "Property").ToList()[MethodNum];
                    decimalConfig = methodInfo.Invoke(entityConfig, new[] { lambdaExpression }) as DecimalPropertyConfiguration;
                }

                decimalConfig.HasPrecision(propAttr.attr.Precision, propAttr.attr.Scale);
            }
        }
    }
0

@Mark007, I have changed the type selection criteria to ride of the DbSet<> properties of the DbContext. I think this is safer because there are times when you have classes in the given namespace that shouldn't be part of the model definition or they are but are not entities. Or your entities could reside in separate namespaces or separate assemblies and be pulled together into once Context.

Also, even though unlikely, I do not think it's safe to rely on ordering of method definitions, so it's better to pull them out with by Parameter list. (.GetTypeMethods() is an extension method I built to work with the new TypeInfo paradigm and can flatten class hierarchies when looking for methods).

Do note that OnModelCreating delegates to this method:

    private void OnModelCreatingSetDecimalPrecisionFromAttribute(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        foreach (var iSetProp in this.GetType().GetTypeProperties(true))
        {
            if (iSetProp.PropertyType.IsGenericType
                    && (iSetProp.PropertyType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IDbSet<>) || iSetProp.PropertyType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(DbSet<>)))
            {
                var entityType = iSetProp.PropertyType.GetGenericArguments()[0];

                foreach (var propAttr in entityType
                                        .GetProperties(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance)
                                        .Select(p => new { prop = p, attr = p.GetCustomAttribute<DecimalPrecisionAttribute>(true) })
                                        .Where(propAttr => propAttr.attr != null))
                {
                    var entityTypeConfigMethod = modelBuilder.GetType().GetTypeInfo().DeclaredMethods.First(m => m.Name == "Entity");
                    var entityTypeConfig = entityTypeConfigMethod.MakeGenericMethod(entityType).Invoke(modelBuilder, null);

                    var param = ParameterExpression.Parameter(entityType, "c");
                    var lambdaExpression = Expression.Lambda(Expression.Property(param, propAttr.prop.Name), true, new ParameterExpression[] { param });

                    var propertyConfigMethod =
                        entityTypeConfig.GetType()
                            .GetTypeMethods(true, false)
                            .First(m =>
                            {
                                if (m.Name != "Property")
                                    return false;

                                var methodParams = m.GetParameters();

                                return methodParams.Length == 1 && methodParams[0].ParameterType == lambdaExpression.GetType();
                            }
                            );

                    var decimalConfig = propertyConfigMethod.Invoke(entityTypeConfig, new[] { lambdaExpression }) as DecimalPropertyConfiguration;

                    decimalConfig.HasPrecision(propAttr.attr.Precision, propAttr.attr.Scale);
                }
            }
        }
    }



    public static IEnumerable<MethodInfo> GetTypeMethods(this Type typeToQuery, bool flattenHierarchy, bool? staticMembers)
    {
        var typeInfo = typeToQuery.GetTypeInfo();

        foreach (var iField in typeInfo.DeclaredMethods.Where(fi => staticMembers == null || fi.IsStatic == staticMembers))
            yield return iField;

        //this bit is just for StaticFields so we pass flag to flattenHierarchy and for the purpose of recursion, restrictStatic = false
        if (flattenHierarchy == true)
        {
            var baseType = typeInfo.BaseType;

            if ((baseType != null) && (baseType != typeof(object)))
            {
                foreach (var iField in baseType.GetTypeMethods(true, staticMembers))
                    yield return iField;
            }
        }
    }
  • I just realized I didn't deal with ComplexTypes by this approach. Will revise it later. – Eniola Oct 23 '14 at 14:28
  • However, the solution proposed by Brian is simple, elegant and works. I won't make any categorical statements about performance but riding off already reflected PropertyInfo rather than hunting down yours should yield better performance on very large models (in the order of 200 and above). – Eniola Oct 23 '14 at 15:27

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