3

This is not a dupe of std::unique_ptr with an incomplete type won't compile.

Consider the code below:

#include <memory>

struct X
{
    X();
    ~X();    

    struct Impl; 
    std::unique_ptr<Impl> up_;
};

struct Impl {}; // fully visible here

X::X() : up_{nullptr}{}
X::~X() = default;

int main()
{
    X x;
}

Live on Coliru

gcc/clang both spit an error saying that Impl is incomplete. However, I provide a default destructor for X after Impl is fully visible, so IMO the code should compile. Why doesn't? Now comes the surprise: If I make Impl an inner class, i.e. define

struct X::Impl{};

instead, then the code compiles, even without providing a destructor. Why is this happening? Shouldn't we provide such a default destructor, at least according to the link mentioned in the first line?

  • 2
    Where you say "// fully visible here"; this is a different class from the one you declared in struct X. Try moving struct Impl; before struct X. – Richard Critten Jan 28 '16 at 0:46
  • @RichardCritten I think the structure should be fully visible in the destructor of X, which is defined after. At least that was my understanding of implementing PIMPL with unique_ptr. – vsoftco Jan 28 '16 at 0:55
  • 1
    In the code as originally written, there are two distinct unrelated things named Impl. You have X::Impl that's declared but never defined - that's the one up_ uses. Then there's ::Impl that's defined but never used. When you write struct X::Impl{}; instead, you now have a single type named X::Impl that's declared and defined. – Igor Tandetnik Jan 28 '16 at 1:05
  • 1
    Split the code up into multiple cpp files as you normally would, and it fails to compile. If you uncomment the lines in the command edit box in my example, it'll compile. I think your second example above compiles because the end of the translation unit is a valid point of instantiation, so the unique_ptr destructor is not instantiated until then (not sure about this part). – Praetorian Jan 28 '16 at 1:05
  • @IgorTandetnik Ohhh I see, I though struct Impl; is a forward declaration and will be considered as outside the class, but is treated by the compiler as X::Impl. You are right, if I move e.g. struct Impl; above struct X{} then it works. – vsoftco Jan 28 '16 at 1:06
11

You have two different structs named Impl.

struct X
{
    struct Impl; // Here you declare X::Impl
    std::unique_ptr<Impl> up_;  // Here you create a pointer to a X::Impl
};

struct Impl {};  // Here you declare and define ::Impl

...

int main()
{
    X x;  // Here X::Impl is still incomplete
}

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