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I have a php script that checks hamming distance between 2 still photos taken from a security camera.

The table is mySQL with 2.4M rows, and consists of a Key and 4 INT(10)s. The INT(10)s have been indexed individually, together, and together with the Key, but I don't have significant evidence that any combination was faster than the others. I can try again if you suggest to do so.

The hamming weights are calculated by transforming the image into 8x16 pixels, and each quarter of the bits is stored in a column, pHash0, pHash1... etc.

There are 2 ways I have written it. The first way was to use nested derived tables. Theoretically, each derivation should have lesser data to check than it's predecessor. The query is a prepared statement, and the ? fields are the pHash[0-3] of the file I'm checking against.

Select
    `Key`,
    Bit_Count(T3.pHash3 ^ ?) + T3.BC2 As BC3
  From
    (Select
      *,
      Bit_Count(T2.pHash2 ^ ?) + T2.BC1 As BC2
    From
      (Select
        *,
        Bit_Count(T1.pHash1 ^ ?) + T1.BC0 As BC1
      From
        (Select
          `Key`,
          pHash0,
          pHash1,
          pHash2,
          pHash3,
          Bit_Count(pHash0 ^ ?) As BC0
        From
          files
        Where
          Not pHash0 Is Null And
          Bit_Count(pHash0 ^ ?) < 4) As T1
      Where
        Bit_Count(T1.pHash1 ^ ?) + T1.BC0 < 4) As T2
    Where
      Bit_Count(T2.pHash2 ^ ?) + T2.BC1 < 4) As T3
  Where
    Bit_Count(T3.pHash3 ^ ?) + T3.BC2 < 4

The second approach was a bit more direct. It just did all of the work at once.

Select
    `Key`,
  From
    files
  Where
    Not pHash0 is null AND
    Bit_Count(pHash0 ^ ?) + Bit_Count(pHash1 ^ ?) + Bit_Count(pHash2 ^
    ?) + Bit_Count(pHash3 ^ ?) < 4

The first query is faster on large recordsets, while the second is faster on smaller recordsets, but neither will exceed 1-1/3 seconds per compare on 2.4M records.

Do you see a way of tweaking this process to make it faster? Any suggestions can be quickly tried, such as changing datatypes or indexes.

The setup is Win7x64, MySQL/5.6.6 and InnoDB, nginx/1.99, php-cgi/7.0.0 with zend enabled. The script is called from a webpage, and has buffering turned off for immediate feedback.

EDIT:

It might work better if I change the 4 32-bit integers to 1 binary(16), which would change the compares from 4 to one, but I'd also have to convert my 4 parameters to a 128-bit character, which php won't do. If there was a fast way to combine them, it might squeeze a bit more time off.

EDIT The accepted answer has increased the speed by ~500%. A quick synopsis of our hypothesis: The bitcount of pHash "A" will always be within pHash "B" +/- Hamming Distance.

Special thanks to @duskwuff for tenacity and patience. Cheers @duskwuff!

EDIT This was my most recent query:

Select
  files.`Key`, 
  Bit_Count(? ^ pHash0) + Bit_Count(? ^ pHash1) +
  Bit_Count(? ^ pHash2) + Bit_Count(? ^ pHash3) as BC
  From
    files FORCE INDEX (bitcount)
  Where
    bitCount Between ? And ? 
  AND Bit_Count(? ^ pHash0) + Bit_Count(? ^ pHash1) +
  Bit_Count(? ^ pHash2) + Bit_Count(? ^ pHash3) <= ?
  ORDER BY Bit_Count(? ^ pHash0) + Bit_Count(? ^ pHash1) +
  Bit_Count(? ^ pHash2) + Bit_Count(? ^ pHash3)

Where the first 4 "?" represent the 4 32-bit hashes of the file being checked, the next 2 "?" represent the pre-calculated bitcount of that file +/- the desired hamming distance, and the last "?" represents that hamming distance. The ORDER BY clause is necessary only to bring the closest matches to the top, where a LIMIT 1 clause will return the best match. There is a B-TREE index on the bitcount field.

The dispersion of bitcounts from 2.4-million files fell into a bell curve, having 3 or 4 on the extremes, with 70,000 in the center. If given a file with a bitcount of 64 (which is worst-case), looking for files within a hamming distance of 3 means comparing 20% of the files (490,000 in my case), whereas looking for a hamming distance of 0 would compare only 2.8% of the records (70,000, of course).

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  • Why isn't it simply BIT_COUNT(pHash0 & ?) + BIT_COUNT(pHash1 & ?) + BIT_COUNT(pHash2 & ?) + BIT_COUNT(pHash3 & ?) ?
    – Rick James
    Jan 30 '16 at 1:31
  • @RickJames Yup,it's like that in my second "more direct" example (XOR instead of AND)
    – alfadog67
    Jan 30 '16 at 13:07
  • Oops, I should have said ^, not &.
    – Rick James
    Jan 30 '16 at 13:09
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Observe that BIT_COUNT(a ^ b) is bounded below by the difference between BIT_COUNT(a) and BIT_COUNT(b). (That is, it is always at least equal to the difference, and may be greater.) If you precalculate the total bit count for each row, you can use that to rule out rows which have a total bit count that's too far away from your target. Even better, you can create an index on that column, and that index will be used.

What I'd have in mind would be something along the lines of:

ALTER TABLE files ADD COLUMN totalbits INTEGER;
CREATE INDEX totalbits_index ON files (totalbits);

UPDATE files SET totalbits = BIT_COUNT(pHash1) + BIT_COUNT(pHash2)
                           + BIT_COUNT(pHash3) + BIT_COUNT(pHash4);

SELECT `Key` FROM files WHERE (totalbits BETWEEN … AND …) AND …

Note that, with this in place, there's no need to split your hashes into four chunks. Combining them back into a single column would make things easier.

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  • thanks for the reply! This won't work for pHashing... you actually have to XOR all 128 bits from one pHash to all 128 bits in the other pHash, and then count the bits that were different to get a hamming distance. The reason I used 32-bit integers was that this code was originally written on a 32-bit machine, and php had trouble with 64-bit columns at the time.
    – alfadog67
    Jan 28 '16 at 20:35
  • @alfadog67 What makes you think it won't work? Remember that XOR is essentially a differencing operation: for the XOR of two values to have less than 4 bits set, the "starting" bit counts of those two values need to be within 4 of each other.
    – user149341
    Jan 28 '16 at 20:44
  • Take for example bitcount(11110000) + bitcount(00001111) = 8, bitcount(11110000 ^ 00001111) also = 8, which works fine in your query. But, bitcount(11110000) + bitcount(00010111) = 8, and bitcount(11110000 ^ 00010111) = 6. This discrepancy will throw off the hamming weight. I don't want to count the number of set bytes, but the number of different bytes. The math on this message took me 4 tries ;-)
    – alfadog67
    Jan 28 '16 at 21:01
  • @alfadog67 What are those two values supposed to represent? If they're supposed to be stored vs. target hashes, you should be taking their difference, not adding them together…
    – user149341
    Jan 28 '16 at 21:02
  • You're right. not the difference, or adding them together, but Exclusive OR-ing them. Your solution shows them as added, which will diminish the 128 bits to no more than 35 bits. Essentially ((2^32)*4) instead of (2^(32*4))
    – alfadog67
    Jan 28 '16 at 21:03

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