72

I have the following interface in TypeScript:

interface IX {
    a: string,
    b: any,
    c: AnotherType
}

I declare a variable of that type and I initialize all the properties

let x: IX = {
    a: 'abc',
    b: null,
    c: null
}

Then I assign real values to them in an init function later

x.a = 'xyz'
x.b = 123
x.c = new AnotherType()

But I don't like having to specify a bunch of default null values for each property when declaring the object when they're going to just be set later to real values. Can I tell the interface to default the properties I don't supply to null? What would let me do this:

let x: IX = {
    a: 'abc'
}

without getting a compiler error. Right now it tells me

TS2322: Type '{}' is not assignable to type 'IX'. Property 'b' is missing in type '{}'.

62

Can I tell the interface to default the properties I don't supply to null? What would let me do this

No. But by default they are undefined which is mostly just fine. You can use the following pattern, i.e have a type assertion at the point of creation:

let x: IX = {} as any;

x.a = 'xyz'
x.b = 123
x.c = new AnotherType()

I have this and other patterns documented here : https://basarat.gitbooks.io/typescript/content/docs/tips/lazyObjectLiteralInitialization.html

  • 1
    In my case, I would rather have all zeroes instead of undefined... – Qwerty May 25 '18 at 11:57
  • Thank you , without defining bunch of default values i used to have unable to set value for undefined property – Omar Isaid Oct 20 '18 at 21:03
  • 4
    Using any undermines the purpose of TypeScript. There are other answers without this drawback. – Jack Miller Feb 1 at 7:35
  • could any one help me about similar question but using generics. Here at this question – TAB Feb 11 at 10:30
  • 1
    Odd that basarat would go with the 'any' example when, in the link provided, he offers a much better option with 'let foo = {} as Foo;' ('Foo" being an Interface) – Neurothustra Feb 28 at 13:52
45

You can't set default values in an interface, but you can accomplish what you want to do by using Optional Properties (compare paragraph #3):

https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/interfaces.html

Simply change the interface to:

interface IX {
    a: string,
    b?: any,
    c?: AnotherType
}

You can then do:

let x: IX = {
    a: 'abc'
}

And use your init function to assign default values to x.b and x.c if those properies are not set.

  • 1
    In the question it was asked to initialize x.b and x.c with null. When writing let x = {a: 'abc'} then x.b and x.c are undefined, so this answer doesn't fully meet the requirements, although it's a smart quick fix. – Benny Neugebauer Mar 17 '18 at 11:26
  • @BennyNeugebauer The accepted answer has the same flaw. This is the best answer – tel Feb 20 at 22:32
15

You can implement the interface with a class, then you can deal with initializing the members in the constructor:

class IXClass implements IX {
    a: string;
    b: any;
    c: AnotherType;

    constructor(obj: IX);
    constructor(a: string, b: any, c: AnotherType);
    constructor() {
        if (arguments.length == 1) {
            this.a = arguments[0].a;
            this.b = arguments[0].b;
            this.c = arguments[0].c;
        } else {
            this.a = arguments[0];
            this.b = arguments[1];
            this.c = arguments[2];
        }
    }
}

Another approach is to use a factory function:

function ixFactory(a: string, b: any, c: AnotherType): IX {
    return {
        a: a,
        b: b,
        c: c
    }
}

Then you can simply:

var ix: IX = null;
...

ix = new IXClass(...);
// or
ix = ixFactory(...);
4

While @Timar's answer works perfectly for null default values (what was asked for), here another easy solution which allows other default values: Define an option interface as well as an according constant containing the defaults; in the constructor use the spread operator to set the options member variable

interface IXOptions {
    a?: string,
    b?: any,
    c?: number
}

const XDefaults: IXOptions = {
    a: "default",
    b: null,
    c: 1
}

export class ClassX {
    private options: IXOptions;

    constructor(XOptions: IXOptions) {
        this.options = { ...XDefaults, ...XOptions };
    }

    public printOptions(): void {
        console.log(this.options.a);
        console.log(this.options.b);
        console.log(this.options.c);
    }
}

Now you can use the class like this:

const x = new ClassX({ a: "set" });
x.printOptions();

Output:

set
null
1
  • What's the point of this.options = this.options; line? – Orkhan Alikhanov Mar 4 at 15:48
  • 1
    Ups! Good catch! I think I added it to avoid TS complaining that options is unused before I added method printOptions(). You can safely remove that line. – Jack Miller Mar 4 at 16:34
0

I stumbled on this while looking for a better way than what I had arrived at. Having read the answers and trying them out I thought it was worth posting what I was doing as the other answers didn't feel as succinct for me. It was important for me to only have to write a short amount of code each time I set up a new interface. I settled on...

Using a custom generic deepCopy function:

deepCopy = <T extends {}>(input: any): T => {
  return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(input));
};

Define your interface

interface IX {
    a: string;
    b: any;
    c: AnotherType;
}

... and define the defaults in a separate const.

const XDef : IX = {
    a: '',
    b: null,
    c: null,
};

Then init like this:

let x : IX = deepCopy(XDef);

That's all that's needed..

.. however ..

If you want to custom initialise any root element you can modify the deepCopy function to accept custom default values. The function becomes:

deepCopyAssign = <T extends {}>(input: any, rootOverwrites?: any): T => {
  return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify({ ...input, ...rootOverwrites }));
};

Which can then be called like this instead:

let x : IX = deepCopyAssign(XDef, { a:'customInitValue' } );

Any other preferred way of deep copy would work. If only a shallow copy is needed then Object.assign would suffice, forgoing the need for the utility deepCopy or deepCopyAssign function.

let x : IX = object.assign({}, XDef, { a:'customInitValue' });

Known Issues

  • It will not deep assign in this guise but it's not too difficult to modify deepCopyAssign to iterate and check types before assigning.
  • Functions and references will be lost by the parse/stringify process. I don't need those for my task and neither did the OP.
  • Custom init values are not hinted by the IDE or type checked when executed.

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