2

So, I was giving some examples of how to use dynamically-allocated 2d arrays and was about to send code that was essentially the following:

int size = 5;
int* arr = new int[ size ];
for( int i = 0; i < size; i++ )
    arr[ i ] = i;
delete[] arr;

size = 10;
int* arr = new int[ size ];
for( int i = size; i > 0; i-- )
    arr[ i ] = i;
delete[] arr;

This gave me a redefinition error, but I thought that delete[] frees the space in memory (and thus 'arr'). I know how to work around this (new array name, don't delete[]/redefine), but I was wondering what's actually going on that gives the error?

  • 4
    It doesn't have anything to do with dynamically allocated arrays. It is the same as this: int n = 42; int n = 42; – juanchopanza Jan 29 '16 at 7:35
  • You do know what it means to declare or define a variable? – Some programmer dude Jan 29 '16 at 7:39
  • Note that you could have reused variable names if the bottom five lines of code had been inside a {..} block. – Mr Lister Jan 29 '16 at 7:39
  • 1
    @MrLister: If you are used to a language where variables "just appear", then you might have learnt parrot fashion that int arr = new int[size]; is how to create a size element array - without having realized the difference between variable definition, initialization, and assignment. – Martin Bonner Jan 29 '16 at 8:08
  • 2
    Others have answered why this doesn't work as a normal scoping problem that you might have in any language. But I think your questions also reveals a misunderstanding of C++ and why it totally different from scripting languages like for example javascript. In a scripting language, the symbol for a variable exists at runtime, so it makes sense that you could delete the symbol. But with C++, the symbols do not actually exist in the program, they are just a sort of annotation so a human can read the source. So the very idea of deleting a symbol is misguided. – fluffybunny Jan 29 '16 at 8:09
7

You might want to try this:

int size = 5;
int* arr = new int[ size ];
for( int i = 0; i < size; i++ )
    arr[ i ] = i;
delete[] arr;

size = 10;
arr = new int[ size ]; //<-- no int* here, we just need to reassign
for( int i = size; i > 0; i-- )
    arr[ i ] = i;
delete[] arr;

We are indeed deallocating the block of memory arr points to, but that doesn't mean we are removing the int* arr. We just removed it's 'content'.

It's just a non assigned pointer again after we delete it.

1

The arr is declared twice. You can reuse it but without declare it again.

size = 10;
int* arr = new int[ size ];

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