2

I wrote a simple c program like this

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
int a=10;
int *p;int **q;
p=&a,q=&p;
printf("size of p %d\n",sizeof(p));
printf("%d\t%d\n",p,q);
printf("%d\t%d",++p,++q);
}

output is like this

size of p 8
55611340        55611320
55611344        55611328

if i am execcuting same binary once more i am getting like this

size of p 8
-385904884      -385904904
-385904880      -385904896

why output is varying in reverse way second time . O/p is randomly varying in reverse way every time. Can any please tell me why this one happens

3
  • 8
    You have undefined behaviour. "%d" is not for printing pointers. Jan 29, 2016 at 13:35
  • 2
    @juanchopanza: and sizeof() returns a size_t, not an int.
    – user3185968
    Jan 29, 2016 at 13:37
  • 2
    There's no reverse here. -385904884 + 4 = -385904880
    – Art
    Jan 29, 2016 at 13:42

4 Answers 4

3

The %d format specifier is for printing signed integers, not pointers. Using the incorrect format specifier invokes undefined behavior.

To properly print pointers, use the %p format specifier and cast the pointer in question to void * (one of the rare time casting to/from void * is required).

printf("%p\t%p\n", (void *)p, (void *)q);
printf("%p\t%p", (void *)(++p), (void *)(++q));

Also, use the %zu format specifier for printing a size_t (which the sizeof operator returns).

printf("size of p %zu\n",sizeof(p));
2

You created 64 bit app so the size of pointer is 8 bytes

All pointer is ok, It will be clear, if you display pointer value properly (all values will be in hexadecimal):

the only correct way:

printf("%p\t%p\n",p,q);
printf("%p\t%p",++p,++q);

or you may use (do not protected from undefined behavior)

printf("%016llx\t%016llx\n",p,q);
printf("%016llx\t%016llx",++p,++q);

or simple unsigned values

printf("%llu\t%llu\n",p,q);
printf("%llu\t%llu",++p,++q);

Reversed values is because you display integer values (signed), if you display unsigned value or hexadecimal integer the results will be displayed properly.

3
  • 1
    Although you are correct in practice, there are no guarantees that this code will work portably. %p is the correct conversion specifier for printing pointers. (I didn't down vote)
    – Lundin
    Jan 29, 2016 at 14:09
  • @Lundin I have updated my post now its ok)) Thank you for pointing me!))
    – Mykola
    Jan 29, 2016 at 14:12
  • 1
    Well, it is not the most correct way, it is the only correct way :)
    – Lundin
    Jan 29, 2016 at 14:15
2

Im going to try answer the question I think you are asking which is this:

Why are the numbers not what I expect?

I got some deeper insight into your program by modifying it thus:

#include<stdio.h>
void main()
{
int a=10;
int *p;int **q;
p=&a,q=&p;
printf("size of p %d\n",sizeof(p));
printf("size of q %d\n", sizeof(q));
printf("size of int %d\n", sizeof(int));
printf("size of int* %d\n", sizeof(int*));
printf("size of int** %d\n", sizeof(int**));
printf("%d\t%d\n",p,q);
printf("%d\t%d",++p,++q);
}

I get the following results:

size of p 8
size of q 8
size of int 4
size of int* 8
size of int** 8
1741631236  1741631240
1741631240  1741631248

The interpretation of this is that p is a pointer to an int, which is 4 bytes in size. When you increment a pointer-to-int the pointer gets incremented by 4. However q is a pointer-to-pointer. Now, a pointer is 8 bytes in size, so when you increment a pointer-to-pointer, it gets incremented by 8.

This is exactly what we see in your example output as well: the difference between p and q, before and after the increment, is 4 and 8 respectively.

2
  • Thanks . your answer is clear , i have one small doubt when we use int **q --> what this int is actually refer to ?
    – Vivek
    Jan 31, 2016 at 13:32
  • Thanks . your answer is clear , i have one small doubt when we use int *p--> when i increment p it incements by four, if char *p --> when i increment p it increments by one . so My actual doubt is int **q --> when q stores the addrees of p . If i increment q it increments by 8. what exactly "int/char " stands in double pointer (int/char **q). Thanks in advance
    – Vivek
    Jan 31, 2016 at 13:43
0

It looks like % d is used for printing address in code.%d is used for integer variable so it taking has

INT_MIN Minimum value for a variable of type int. –2147483648

INT_MAX Maximum value for a variable of type int. 2147483647

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.