4

Given the following structure, I want to select the first level of children (li) from the list (ul), but not the nested list.

ul.list > li {
  background-color: red;
}
<ul id="list" class="list">
   <li>first level</li>
   <li>first level</li>
   <li>
      <h1></h1>       
      <div>
         <ul>
            <li>second level</li>
            <li>second level</li>
         </ul>
      </div>
   </li>
   <li></li>
</ul>

(JSFiddle)

But that selects also the items (li) inside the div.

I want to select the first level of children (li) using only ONE css RULE. How?

  • 1
    give an id to the ul and use it as selector #myUlId>li or add parent's ul to the selector body>ul>li – G-Cyr Jan 29 '16 at 21:18
  • 1
    Why don't you give your first ul a class and then go .class li ? – Fausto NA Jan 29 '16 at 21:18
  • 1
    that is because everything is indeed wrapped inside first-level lis. – Aziz Jan 29 '16 at 21:39
  • 1
    I think some people overlooked that fact, so when you apply something to the first-level lis, you essentially affect everything. Do you have control over the HTML structure? why not just wrap second levels with a UL parent instead of LI parent? – Aziz Jan 29 '16 at 21:44
  • 3
    Another thing is... you've set the background-color or ul.list > li -- the inner <h1></h1><div><ul>...</ul></div> IS a list item in the outermost list, so its background is set because it is a whole subtree of the outer li – Stephen P Jan 29 '16 at 21:56
3

css does not have a selector that would allow you to specify that all/none of the ancestor elements must match certain critieria (i.e. not be a list), you would need xpath for that.

but what you can do is the following:

ul > li {
  // top level list item styles here
}

li ul > li {
  all: initial;
  // nested item styles here
}

See MDN all for documentation on resetting styles. You can also selectively unset specific properties.

1

CSS

ul li div ul li { 
  /* Your styles here to override parent (if they are over 70% the same) */ 
}
  • While this answer is correct, you really should include a better explanation. – Tiny Giant Jan 29 '16 at 21:46
1

You can add a class to the <li>s which contain second-level content and then exclude them from the main CSS query using the :not pseudo-class

ul.list > li:not(.level2) {
  background-color: red;
}
<ul class="list">
   <li>first level</li>
   <li>first level</li>
   
   <li class="level2"> first level with nested content
      <h1>some title</h1>       
      <div>
         <ul>
            <li>second level</li>
            <li>second level</li>
         </ul>
      </div>
   </li>
   
   <li>first level</li>
</ul>

1

What you have does work, you just need to style the inner li's too, as their background by default is transparent.

Note though, that some properties are inherited by default and will be picked up by the inner li's and needs to be set explicit, like the font color.

ul.list > li li {
  background-color: black;
}

ul.list > li {
  background-color: red;
  color: blue;
}


ul.list2 > li li {
  background-color: black;
  color: yellow;
}

ul.list2 > li {
  background-color: red;
  color: blue;
}
<div>Sample 1</div>

<ul id="list" class="list">
   <li>first level</li>
   <li>first level</li>
   <li>
      <h1></h1>       
      <div>
         <ul>
            <li>second level</li>
            <li>second level</li>
         </ul>
      </div>
   </li>
   <li></li>
</ul>

<hr>
<div>Sample 2</div>

<ul id="list2" class="list2">
   <li>first level</li>
   <li>first level</li>
   <li>
      <h1></h1>       
      <div>
         <ul>
            <li>second level</li>
            <li>second level</li>
         </ul>
      </div>
   </li>
   <li></li>
</ul>

0

you need to identify your first ul:

<ul class="my-list">
   <li></li>
   <li></li>
   <li>
      <h1></h1>       
      <div>
         <ul>
            <li></li>
            <li></li>
         </ul>
      </div>
   </li>
   <li></li>
</ul>

then select it with ul.my-list>li

  • in comments we mostly talked about Id, :) – G-Cyr Jan 29 '16 at 21:26
  • tried adding a class and id with no success, the second level items (li) are selected either way. I've added a jsfiddle to illustrate it. – Marco Jan 29 '16 at 21:36
  • This does not actually work, you would still have to reset the nested lists. – Tiny Giant Jan 29 '16 at 21:48
  • 1
    @TinyGiant it actually works, jsfiddle.net/ygoh1cee/3 did you realize that childs without background will show background parent ;) – G-Cyr Jan 29 '16 at 22:19
  • @GCyrillus Yes, so you still have to reset the children, because its parent will have a background colour, and for inherited properties like font colour you will of course still have to reset the children. As I said before, this won't work for what the op is looking for. – Tiny Giant Jan 29 '16 at 23:14
0

in your case the problem is background-color, the color is only applied on .list>li but childrens show parent's background.

to separate color, you need to add element (for example div or span)

.list>li>span{
  background-color: red;
}
<ul id="list" class="list">
   <li><span>first level</span></li>
   <li><span>first level</span></li>
   <li>
      <h1></h1>       
      <div>
         <ul>
            <li>second level</li>
            <li>second level</li>
         </ul>
      </div>
   </li>
   <li></li>
</ul>

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